LA Times Crossword Answers 26 Apr 15, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Don Gagliardo & C.C. Burnikel
THEME: Tea Party … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common phrase, but with an extra “T” sound inserted:

23A. Profitable agreement? PLUM TREATY (from “plum tree”)
29A. Ending a relationship in a text? FAULTY BREAK (from “fall break”)
37A. Sherpa’s responsibilities? MOUNTAIN DUTY (from “Mountain Dew”)
63A. Sale of Babe Ruth to the Yankees? MIGHTY MISTAKE (from “my mistake”)
81A. Search for the right beard? GOATEE HUNTING (from “go hunting”)
103A. Adoring father-to-daughter words? THAT’S MY CUTIE (from “that’s my cue”)
113A. Result of substituting fabric strips for chips? RAGGEDY ANTE (from “Raggedy Ann”)
124A. Delicate one in the kitchen? DAINTY COOK (from “Dane Cook”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 16m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Soul, to Aristotle ANIMA
The Greek philosopher and scientist Aristotle wrote a treatise called “On the Soul” (known as “De Anima” in Latin). Aristotle postulated that living things had different kinds of souls. The soul of a plant is characterized by its ability to take up nourishment and to reproduce. Animals also have these powers, as well as the powers of sense-perception of self-motion. Humans have all of these powers, and are alone in having the power of intellect.

22. __-pedi MANI
Manicure & pedicure (mani-pedi)

26. Organic food giant EDEN
Eden Foods is the largest supplier of organic dry grocery items in the United States. Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Eden was founded in 1969 as a co-op grocery store.

27. Arabian pop SIRE
The Arab (or Arabian) breed of horse takes its name from its original home, the Arabian Peninsula. Like any animal that humans have over-bred, the horse falls prey to genetic diseases, some of which are fatal and some of which require the horse to be euthanized.

28. Canadian roadside sign ESSO
The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of “Standard” and “Oil” (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

33. “Wanderlust” actor Alan ALDA
Alan Alda has had a great television career, especially of course on “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

“Wanderlust” is a 2012 movie about a young married couple from the Big Apple who find themselves living in a hippie commune in rural Georgia. The couple is played by Jennifer Aniston and Paul Rudd.

35. “Love Jones” co-star Long NIA
Nia Long is an American actress, probably best known for playing Will Smith’s sometime girlfriend and fiancee Lisa Wilkes on the TV show “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air”.

“Love Jones” is a 1997 romantic drama starring Larenz Tate and Nia Long as a poet and photographer who meet and fall in love. I haven’t seen this one, but I hear good things about it …

37. Sherpa’s responsibilities? MOUNTAIN DUTY (from “Mountain Dew”)
If you check the can, you’ll see that the soda once called “Mountain Dew” is now known as “Mtn Dew”.

In the Tibetan language, Sherpa means “eastern people” (sher = east, pa = people). Sherpas are an ethnic group from Nepal, but the name is also used for the local guides who assist mountaineers in the Himalayas, and particularly on Mount Everest.

42. Elantra competitor CIVIC
Introduced in 1972, the Honda Civic is the second-oldest brand of Japanese car made for the US today (only the Toyota Corolla has been around longer). Today’s Civic is a compact car, but the original was smaller, and classed as a sub-compact. The first design had a transverse-mounted engine and front-wheel drive to save on space, copying the configuration introduced with the British Mini.

The Elantra is a compact car made by Hyundai of South Korea.

44. “Head and Shell” artist ARP
Tête et coquille” (Head and Shell) is a 1933 sculpture by Jean Arp that is owned by the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

48. Aleve alternative ANACIN
Anacin is a pain reliever, with aspirin and caffeine as active ingredients.

Aleve is a Bayer brand name for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

52. Chilling spot SOFA
“Sofa” is a Turkish word meaning “bench”.

54. Shanghai locale ASIA
Shanghai is a major city on the west coast of China that is home to the busiest container port in the world. The name “Shanghai” translates as “Upon-the-Sea”.

59. Lennon’s love ONO
Yoko Ono is an avant-garde artist. Ono actually met her future husband John Lennon for the first time while she was preparing her conceptual art exhibit called “Hammer a Nail”. Visitors were encouraged to hammer in a nail into a wooden board, creating the artwork. Lennon wanted to hammer in the first nail, but Ono stopped him as the exhibition had not yet opened. Apparently Ono relented when Lennon paid her an imaginary five shillings to hammer an imaginary nail into the wood.

60. “Edda” author __ Sturluson SNORRI
Snorri Sturluson was an Icelandic historian and poet who wrote the “Prose Edda”, an important narrative of Norse mythology. Sturluson lived from 1179 to 1241 CE.

63. Sale of Babe Ruth to the Yankees? MIGHTY MISTAKE (from “my mistake”)
1919 was a big year for Babe Ruth and his team, the Boston Red Sox. Ruth broke the league’s record for the number of home runs in one season, and Red Sox had record-breaking attendance at Fenway Park. Team owner Harry Frazee caused some controversy, when he sold Ruth’s contract to the New York Yankees in December of that year.

66. First, second and third ORDINALS
Ordinal numbers express a position in a series, i.e. first, second, third etc.

69. More work UTOPIA
“Utopia” is a work by Sir Thomas More, i.e. a “More work”.

The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More for his book “Utopia” published in 1516 describing an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

70. Sea damaged by Soviet-era waterworks ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

73. “Murdering Airplane” and “The Hat Makes the Man” ERNSTS
Max Ernst was a painter and sculptor, a pioneer in the Dada movement and Surrealism. Ernst was born near Cologne in Germany in 1891 and he was called up to fight in WWI, as were most young German men at that time. In his autobiography he writes “Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914” a statement about his experiences in the war. In reality, Ernst died in 1976 having lived to the ripe old age of 85.

75. Mountain lake TARN
A tarn is a mountain lake that has been formed by glacial excavation.

81. Search for the right beard? GOATEE HUNTING (from “go hunting”)
A goatee is a beard formed just by hair on a man’s chin. The name probably comes from the tuft of hair seen on an adult goat.

86. Bach’s “Mass __ Minor” IN B
Perhaps the most famous mass in classical music is J. S. Bach’s “Mass in B minor”, fittingly completed just before he died. It was one of the last of Bach’s compositions, although much of the music was composed earlier in his life.

88. 4 for He, e.g. AT WT
The element helium (He) has an atomic number (at. no.) of 2, and atomic weight (at. wt.) of 4, and is one of the noble gases.

91. Spanish surrealist DALI
The famous surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was born in Figueres, Spain. I had the privilege of visiting the Dalí Museum in Figueres some years ago, just north of Barcelona. If you ever get the chance, it’s a “must see” as it really is a quite magnificent building with a fascinating collection.

100. Early Indo-European ARYAN
The term Aryan can be used to describe the Indo-European languages or the peoples who speak them. The underlying assumption in this grouping is that Indian languages (based on Sanskrit) and the major European languages all have the same root.

109. Poseidon’s realm SEA
Poseidon was the god of the sea in Greek mythology as well as the “Earth-Shaker”, the god responsible for earthquakes.

112. Chicago’s __ Center AON
The Aon Center in Chicago is the third-tallest building in the city. There is also an Aon Center in Los Angeles that is the second-tallest building in that city.

113. Result of substituting fabric strips for chips? RAGGEDY ANTE (from “Raggedy Ann”)
Raggedy Ann is a rag doll, created by Johnny Gruelle in 1915 for his daughter, Marcella. He decided to name the doll by combining the titles of two poems by James Whitcomb Riley, “The Raggedy Man” and “Little Orphan Annie”. Gruelle introduced Raggedy Ann in a series of books three years later. Sadly, Marcella died at 13 years of age with her father blaming a smallpox vaccination she was given at school. Gruelle became very active in the movement against mass vaccination, for which Raggedy Ann became a symbol.

116. Condé __ NAST
Condé Nast has a very large portfolio of publications, including “Vogue”, “GQ”, “House and Garden”, “Golf Digest”, “Wired”, “Vanity Fair” and “The New Yorker”.

123. Jetson at the Little Dipper School ELROY
“The Jetsons” is an animated show from Hanna-Barbera that had its first run in 1962-1963, and then was recreated in 1985-1987. When it was debuted in 1963 by ABC, “The Jetsons” was the network’s first ever color broadcast. “The Jetsons” are like a space-age version of “The Flintstones”. The four Jetson family members are George and Jane, the parents, and children Judy and Elroy. Residing with the family are Rosie the household robot, and Astro the pet dog.

124. Delicate one in the kitchen? DAINTY COOK (from “Dane Cook”)
Dane Cook is a stand-up comedian who has had a number of roles in movies as well. He had a setback handling the income he was earning from his work though back in 2008. His half-brother had been his business manager up to that point and it was discovered that he had embezzled millions of dollars from Dane. The half-brother and his wife are now in prison for the crime.

129. Way around Paris METRO
The Paris Métro is the busiest underground transportation system in western Europe, carrying about 4.5 million passengers a day, about the same as the New York City Subway. The system took its name from the company that originally operated it, namely “La Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris”, which was shorted to “Métro”. The term “Metro” was then adopted for similar systems in cities all over the world.

130. Grandson of Adam ENOS
Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve.

Down
2. Niger neighbor MALI
The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in western Africa, south of Algeria. Formerly known as French Sudan, Mali’s most famous city is Timbuktu.

The Republic of Niger is a landlocked country in Western Africa that gets its name from the Niger River. 80% of the country lies within the bounds of the Sahara Desert.

4. Chinese menu offering LO MEIN
“Chow mein” has two slightly different meanings on the East and West Coasts of the US. On the East Coast, “basic” chow mein is a crispy dish, whereas on the West Coast it is a steamed dish that is relatively soft. On the East Coast the steamed dish is available, but under the name “lo mein”. On the West Coast, the crispy dish is also on the menu, as Hong Kong style chow mein.

5. Upper-level doc? ENT
Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (ENT)

7. “Frankenstein” torchbearers PEASANTS
In the 1931 movie “Frankenstein”, the title character joins a search party of peasants as they chase the Monster through the night, carrying glowing torches and pitchforks. The mob corners the Monster in a abandoned windmill at the top of a hill. They set the mill on fire, burning the Monster alive.

9. Babe’s home STY
The hit 1995 film “Babe” was produced and filmed in Australia. The movie is an adaptation of a 1983 novel called “The Sheep-Pig” written by Dick King-Smith. “Babe” was a smash hit at the box office and was extremely well received by the critics. The film was nominated for the Best Picture Oscar, but lost out to “Braveheart”. However, it did win the Oscar for Best Visual Effects by beating out “Apollo 13”, which was an amazing feat, I’d say…

10. Naan flour ATTA
Atta is a whole-wheat flour used to make flatbreads in South Asian cuisine, such as chapati and naan. “Atta” is the Hindi or Urdu word for “dough”.

12. Right-leaning, in a way ITALIC
Italic type leans to the right. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

13. Curaçao cocktail MAI TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic’s restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

The liqueur known as Curaçao comes from the island of Curaçao in the southern Caribbean. The liqueur is usually given artificial coloring to make it suitable for use in exotic cocktails. The common colors used are blue and orange.

15. Longtime de facto U.S. national anthem AMERICA
The patriotic song “America” is also known by its first line, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”. The song was written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1831, and was the de facto national anthem of the country until “The Star-Spangled Banner” was declared the official anthem in 1931. The melody of “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee” is identical with the British national anthem, “God Save the Queen”.

32. __-puf: old laundry product STA
Sta-Puf was a laundry rinse that was popular some decades ago. I don’t think that it’s around anymore …

34. Home to the skyscraper Burj Khalifa DUBAI
Burj Khalifa is a spectacular skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It is the tallest man-made structure in the world, and has been so since the completion of its exterior in 2009. The space in the building came onto the market at a really bad time, during the global financial crisis. The building was part of a US$20 billion development of downtown Dubai that was backed by the city government which had to go looking for a bailout from the neighboring city of Abu Dhabi. The tower was given the name Burj Khalifa at the last minute, apparently as a nod to the UAE president Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan who helped to broker the bailout.

38. Maine college town ORONO
The town of Orono is home to the University of Maine, founded in 1862. The college is actually located on an island (Marsh island) lying between the Penobscot and Stillwater rivers. The town of Orono is named after Joseph Orono, a chief of the Penobscot Nation.

40. Bar brew, briefly IPA
India Pale Ale is a style of beer that comes from England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

43. “Esthetic” and “egis” VARIANTS
“Esthetic” is a variant spelling of “aesthetic”, and “egis” is a variant spelling of “aegis”.

Someone is said to be under the aegis (also “egis”) of someone else (for example) if that other person provides protection, or perhaps sponsorship. The word “aegis” comes from the Greek word for a goat (“aigis”), the idea being that the goatskin shield or breastplate worn by Zeus or Athena, gave some measure of protection.

47. Miss Gulch’s bane TOTO
Miss Almira Gulch is the woman who gets bitten by Dorothy’s dog Toto right at the start of “The Wizard of Oz”. In Oz, Miss Gulch manifests herself as the Wicked Witch of the West.

50. “__ Dinka Doo” INKA
“Inka Dinka Doo” was Jimmy Durante’s theme song, a novelty piece composed by Durante in 1934. Such was his association with the song that when Durante’s charity paid for a heated therapy swimming pool in Port Arthur, Texas in 1968, it was named the “Inka Dinka Doo Pool”.

51. December number NOEL
“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, ultimately coming from the Latin word for “birth” (natalis). Noel has come to be used as an alternative for “Christmas carol”.

53. Gung-ho ARDENT
“Kung ho” is a Chinese expression meaning “work together, cooperate”. The anglicized version “gung ho” was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

55. Uses Gchat, e.g. IMS
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

“Gchat” is a common name for the Google Talk instant messaging service. Google Talk offers both text and voice communication as well as a plugin that allows video chat. All of this works seamlessly with Gmail, my personal favorite email client. That said, much of this functionality seems to have been replaced with the Google Hangouts service.

61. Dog star’s first name? RIN
The original Rin Tin Tin was a real-life dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, “Rinty” was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie “Where the North Begins”. Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go …

64. Prada competitor GUCCI
Gucci was founded in Rome in 1921, by Guccio Gucci. Guccio’s son Aldo took over the company after his father’s death in 1953. It was Aldo who established the international presence for the brand and opened the company’s first overseas store, in New York City.

65. Covered in ink, with “up” TATTED
The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”.

67. Word heard coming and going ALOHA
The Hawaiian word “Aloha” has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently “aloha” has come to mean “hello” and “goodbye”, but only since the mid-1800s.

68. Nocturnal primate LEMUR
Lemurs are the most unusual-looking creatures, native to the island of Madagascar off the east coast of Africa. With their white fur and dark eyes that are very reflective at night, they have a “ghostly” appearance. Indeed, the animals takes their name from Roman mythology in which “lemures” were spirits of the restless dead.

74. Motor oil letters SAE
The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) sets standards for motor oils, especially with regard to an oil’s viscosity.

75. Week-ending cry TGIF
“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

79. Cut taker: Abbr. AGT
Agent (agt.)

80. __ Lama DALAI
The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

82. Big band era singer Ray EBERLE
Ray Eberle was a singer, most notably with the Glenn Miller Orchestra.

89. Yuletide quaffs WASSAILS
“Wassail” is ale or mulled wine used for toasting at festivals, especially Christmas. The term “wassail” comes from Old Norse “ves heill” meaning “be healthy”.

90. Where to see old MGM movies TCM
Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is one of my favorite television channels, delivering just what its name promises: classic movies.

97. Marriott competitor HYATT
The Hyatt hotel chain takes its name from the first hotel in the group, that was purchased in 1957 i.e. Hyatt House at Los Angeles International Airport. Among other things, Hyatt is famous for designing the world’s first atrium hotel, the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta.

101. Shelter ASYLUM
“Asylum” is a Latin word, meaning “sanctuary”.

104. Bridge holding TENACE
In the wonderful card game of bridge, a tenace is a broken sequence of honor cards, like AQ or KJ.

105. Danny Kaye was its first celebrity goodwill ambassador UNICEF
The United Nations Children’s Fund is known by the acronym UNICEF because the organization’s original name when it was founded in 1946 was the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund. The original focus of the fund was to provide relief to children in countries that had been devastated by WWII. UNICEF is supported by contributions from governments, but also by individual donors. One of the more successful programs for collecting private donations is the Trick-or-Treat UNICEF box that has been a tradition here in North America since 1950.

The actor Danny Kaye was a big hit in his native US, but also in France. Kaye was the first ambassador-at-large for UNICEF and the French awarded him the Legion of Honor in 1986 for his work.

106. Blog, say WRITE
Many folks who visit this website regard it as just that, a website. That is true, but more correctly it is referred to as a blog, as I make regular posts (actually daily posts) which then occupy the “front page” of the site. The blog entries are in reverse chronological order, and one can just look back day-by-day, reading older and older posts. “Blog” is a contraction of the term “web log”.

108. Digs in the snow? IGLOO
The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, namely “igdlo”.

“Digs” is short for “diggings” meaning “lodgings”, but where “diggings” came from, no one seems to know.

119. Ex-senator Trent LOTT
Trent Lott was raised Democrat in Mississippi, but served in Congress as a Republican. Lott ran into trouble for remarks he made that were interpreted as being racially motivated, and ended up resigning in 2007.

121. Hershey’s toffee bar SKOR
Skor is a candy bar produced by Hershey’s. Skor is sold in Canada as Rutnam.

124. Banned pesticide DDT
DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don’t forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book “Silent Spring”, suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

125. Sumac of Peru YMA
Yma Sumac was a Peruvian soprano. Sumac had a notable vocal range of five octaves.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Walk casually AMBLE
6. Work OPUS
10. Soul, to Aristotle ANIMA
15. In addition ALSO
19. Place for highlights SALON
20. Walked out WENT
21. Complete TOTAL
22. __-pedi MANI
23. Profitable agreement? PLUM TREATY (from “plum tree”)
25. Path TRAIL
26. Organic food giant EDEN
27. Arabian pop SIRE
28. Canadian roadside sign ESSO
29. Ending a relationship in a text? FAULTY BREAK (from “fall break”)
31. Ideal chaser? -ISM
33. “Wanderlust” actor Alan ALDA
35. “Love Jones” co-star Long NIA
36. Ice show venues RINKS
37. Sherpa’s responsibilities? MOUNTAIN DUTY (from “Mountain Dew”)
42. Elantra competitor CIVIC
44. “Head and Shell” artist ARP
45. Cal. listing APPT
46. Exhausted BEAT
48. Aleve alternative ANACIN
52. Chilling spot SOFA
54. Shanghai locale ASIA
56. Stick together COHERE
59. Lennon’s love ONO
60. “Edda” author __ Sturluson SNORRI
63. Sale of Babe Ruth to the Yankees? MIGHTY MISTAKE (from “my mistake”)
66. First, second and third ORDINALS
69. More work UTOPIA
70. Sea damaged by Soviet-era waterworks ARAL
71. Like some breezes GENTLE
72. Windows runners PCS
73. “Murdering Airplane” and “The Hat Makes the Man” ERNSTS
75. Mountain lake TARN
77. H.S. cooking class HOME EC
79. According to, with “in” AS STATED
81. Search for the right beard? GOATEE HUNTING (from “go hunting”)
84. Waffle SEESAW
86. Bach’s “Mass __ Minor” IN B
87. Surfing needs BOARDS
88. 4 for He, e.g. AT WT
91. Spanish surrealist DALI
92. Rankle FESTER
94. Talk back to SASS
96. Exercise consequence, maybe ACHE
99. __ cat LAP
100. Early Indo-European ARYAN
103. Adoring father-to-daughter words? THAT’S MY CUTIE (from “that’s my cue”)
106. Eddy WHIRL
109. Poseidon’s realm SEA
111. Bullring cries OLES
112. Chicago’s __ Center AON
113. Result of substituting fabric strips for chips? RAGGEDY ANTE (from “Raggedy Ann”)
116. Condé __ NAST
118. Societal troubles ILLS
122. Run in place IDLE
123. Jetson at the Little Dipper School ELROY
124. Delicate one in the kitchen? DAINTY COOK (from “Dane Cook”)
126. Traffic sound TOOT
127. Provide, as money PUT UP
128. Mid-seventh-century year DCLI
129. Way around Paris METRO
130. Grandson of Adam ENOS
131. Hit hard, biblically SMOTE
132. Check TEST
133. Time-time link AFTER

Down
1. Some hieroglyphic squiggles ASPS
2. Niger neighbor MALI
3. Indistinct memory BLUR
4. Chinese menu offering LO MEIN
5. Upper-level doc? ENT
6. Is behind, perhaps OWES
7. “Frankenstein” torchbearers PEASANTS
8. Incalculable UNTOLD
9. Babe’s home STY
10. Naan flour ATTA
11. Like a shutout NO-RUN
12. Right-leaning, in a way ITALIC
13. Curaçao cocktail MAI TAI
14. Side (with) ALLY
15. Longtime de facto U.S. national anthem AMERICA
16. Weighed down LADEN
17. Stealthy sort SNEAK
18. Pen emanations OINKS
24. Update, as charts REMAP
29. Lot FATE
30. Pickling liquids BRINES
32. __-puf: old laundry product STA
34. Home to the skyscraper Burj Khalifa DUBAI
37. Considerable number MASS
38. Maine college town ORONO
39. Available to the highest bidder, say UP FOR GRABS
40. Bar brew, briefly IPA
41. Rides for tycoons YACHTS
43. “Esthetic” and “egis” VARIANTS
47. Miss Gulch’s bane TOTO
49. Large-grain seasoning COARSE SALT
50. “__ Dinka Doo” INKA
51. December number NOEL
53. Gung-ho ARDENT
55. Uses Gchat, e.g. IMS
57. Plugs HYPES
58. 34-Down dignitaries EMIRS
61. Dog star’s first name? RIN
62. Supposedly IN THEORY
64. Prada competitor GUCCI
65. Covered in ink, with “up” TATTED
67. Word heard coming and going ALOHA
68. Nocturnal primate LEMUR
72. Watched the cats, say PET SAT
74. Motor oil letters SAE
75. Week-ending cry TGIF
76. Crackerjack A-ONE
78. Pencil points and erasers ENDS
79. Cut taker: Abbr. AGT
80. __ Lama DALAI
82. Big band era singer Ray EBERLE
83. Sounding stuffy NASAL
85. Picnic cleaner WIPE
89. Yuletide quaffs WASSAILS
90. Where to see old MGM movies TCM
93. They often have concentric circles TARGETS
95. Tongue site SHOE
97. Marriott competitor HYATT
98. Car starter? ECO-
101. Shelter ASYLUM
102. Not far from NEAR TO
104. Bridge holding TENACE
105. Danny Kaye was its first celebrity goodwill ambassador UNICEF
106. Blog, say WRITE
107. Wore HAD ON
108. Digs in the snow? IGLOO
110. Have __: be ready with an excuse AN OUT
114. Acct. entries DEPS
115. Blog, say TYPE
117. Sulky state SNIT
119. Ex-senator Trent LOTT
120. Traditional accounts LORE
121. Hershey’s toffee bar SKOR
124. Banned pesticide DDT
125. Sumac of Peru YMA

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One thought on “LA Times Crossword Answers 26 Apr 15, Sunday”

  1. Some new words for me today: Eberle,
    AON center, and Snorri Sturluson. I have a question about a couple crossword clues: are the works included for Arp and Ernst particularly well-known? I'm not familiar with any of the works clued for them. If the works are not well-known, is there any crossword convention regarding the inclusion of lesser known works?

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