LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Sep 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Anton Shurpik
THEME: Dual Personalities … today’s themed answers are in two parts, with each part being the family name of a celebrity referred to in the clue:

23A. Builder hired by Sharon and James? STONEMASON (Sharon Stone & James Mason)
25A. Tender reminiscence for Donna and Courtney? SUMMER LOVE (Donna Summer & Courtney Love)
36A. European destination for James and Jill? GALWAY, IRELAND (James Galway & Jill Ireland)
56A. Play area for Lucille and Sally? BALL FIELD (Lucille Ball & Sally Field)
58A. Favorite island for Eva Marie and Ricky? SAINT MARTIN (Eva Marie Saint & Ricky Martin)
75A. Brand for Carrie and Vincent? FISHER-PRICE (Carrie Fisher & Vincent Price)
77A. Roadside accumulations for Hank and Tyra? SNOWBANKS (Hank Snow & Tyra Banks)
91A. Vacation for Billie and Tom? HOLIDAY CRUISE (Billie Holiday & Tom Cruise)
111A. Financial strategy for Martin and Soupy? SHORT SALES (Martin Short & Soupy Sales)
113A. Book for Ellen and Ted? PAGE-TURNER (Ellen Page & Ted Turner)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

19. Home with a view AERIE
An aerie is the nest of an eagle, and is also known as an “eyrie”.

20. One-on-one sport EPEE
The épée that is used in today’s sport fencing is derived from the old French dueling sword. In fact, the the sport of épée fencing is very similar to dueling of the 19th century. The word “épée” translates from French as “sword”.

21. Zebra genus EQUUS
The Equus genus of animals includes horse, asses and zebras.

The name “zebra” comes from an old Portuguese word “zevra” meaning “wild ass”. Studies of zebra embryos show that zebras are basically black in color, with white stripes that develop with growth. Before this finding, it was believed they were white, with black stripes.

22. Passing remarks? OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

23. Builder hired by Sharon and James? STONEMASON (Sharon Stone & James Mason)
Actress Sharon Stone’s big break came with her appearance in the erotic thriller “Basic Instinct” released in 1992. Stone really hasn’t landed huge roles in big movies since then, other than the role of Ginger in “Casino”, for which she earned a Golden Globe nomination. Personally I enjoyed her performance in 1994’s “The Specialist”, an entertaining action film in which she played opposite Sylvester Stallone and James Woods.

English actor James Mason made a smooth transition to Hollywood after achieving incredible success in British films in the war years. Mason starred in such films as “The Desert Fox”, “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”, “Lolita”, “North by Northwest” and “Journey to the Center of the Earth”.

25. Tender reminiscence for Donna and Courtney? SUMMER LOVE (Donna Summer & Courtney Love)
Donna Summer is known as “The Queen of Disco”, with great hits like “Love to Love You, Baby”, “I Feel Love” and “Hot Stuff”. In the late sixties and early seventies, LaDonna Gaines (her real name) lived and worked in Germany. There she met and married an Austrian actor called Helmuth Sommer. They divorced not long after the marriage, but Donna kept his family name, just changing the “o” to “u” to give her the stage name of “Donna Summer”.

Courtney Love is a singer-songwriter who was the co-founder of the alternative rock band Hole. Love was married to Kurt Cobain, the lead singer of Nirvana, until his death in 1994.

27. Aquiline facial features HOOK NOSES
A nose that is described as “aquiline” is hooked, in fact shaped like the beak of eagle. “Aquilinus” is Latin for “like an eagle”.

31. Sneaky guy? PETE
“Sneaky Pete” is a slang term for cheap fortified wine, often associated with down-and-outs sleeping rough on skid row.

32. Clarifying Latin phrase ID EST
“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

33. Friend of Frodo SAM
Samwise Gamgee is the sidekick to Frodo Baggins in Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”.

Frodo Baggins is a principal character in J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”. Frodo is a Hobbit, and is charged with the quest of destroying Sauron’s Ring in the fires of Mount Doom.

36. European destination for James and Jill? GALWAY, IRELAND (James Galway & Jill Ireland)
Galway is a city on the west coast of Ireland, the fourth most populous city in the country (after Dublin, Cork and Limerick).

James Galway is Ireland’s most famous flute player. Born in Belfast, Galways now lives in Switzerland.

Jill Ireland was an actress and singer from England. Ireland’s first husband was fellow actor David McCallum, with whom she appeared in five episodes of the TV spy show “The Man from UNCLE”. McCallum introduced Ireland to Charles Bronson when the two actors were filming “The Great Escape” in 1963. That wasn’t such a great idea for McCallum, as Ireland eventually left her husband, with Bronson becoming her second husband in 1968.

42. Some chalcedonies AGATES
Chalcedony is a mineral, a form of silica.

49. “Brava!” elicitor ARIA
To express appreciation for a male performer at an operatic performance, traditionally one calls out “bravo!”. Appreciation for a female performer is shown by using “brava!”, and for more than one performer by using “bravi!”

52. Rap sheet listing PRIOR
A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap” and “to beat the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

56. Play area for Lucille and Sally? BALL FIELD (Lucille Ball & Sally Field)
Lucille Ball was at the height of her success while she was married to Desi Arnaz. The couple met in 1940 and not long afterwards eloped. Lucy had several miscarriages before she gave birth to her first child in 1951, just one month before her fortieth birthday. A year and a half later, while “I Love Lucy” was garnering large audiences, she became pregnant with her second child, a pregnancy that was written into the television show’s script. In fact, the day that Lucy gave birth on the show, was the same day that she gave birth in real life.

Actress Sally Field first came to the public’s attention in the sixties with title roles in the TV shows “Gidget” and “The Flying Nun”. She has two Best Actress Oscars; one for “Norma Rae” (1979) and one for “Places in the Heart” (1984).

58. Favorite island for Eva Marie and Ricky? SAINT MARTIN (Eva Marie Saint & Ricky Martin)
The island of Saint Martin is in the Caribbean. Part of Saint Martin is owned by France, and part by the Netherlands. In fact, it is the smallest inhabited sea island in the world that is divided between two nations.

Eva Marie Saint is an American actor, who won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for playing Edie Doyle in the 1954 movie “On the Waterfront”. My favorite of Saint’s movies is the 1959 Hitchcock classic, “North by Northwest”, in which she starred opposite Cary Grant. She ratcheted back her career at its height, right after her success in “North by Northwest”. Saint opted instead to spend more time with her husband and children, taking very few acting roles. That marriage is still going strong, and she has two children and three grandchildren.

Ricky Martin’s real name is Enrique Martin Morales. A native of Puerto Rico, Martin first achieved fame with the boy band Menudo before going solo in 1991.

63. Winter air CAROL
The word “carol” came into English via the Old French word “carole”, which was a “dance in a ring”. When “carol” made it into English, about 1300 AD, the term was used to describe a dance as well as a joyful song. Around 1500 AD, carols that were sung came to be associated with Christmas.

68. Flummoxed AT SEA
Flummoxed is another lovely word, meaning confused or perplexed. It is probably of English origin, derived from some local dialect.

69. Melodious ARIOSE
A tune that is “ariose” is song-like, characterized by melody as opposed to harmony.

71. Sailing vessels BARKS
A barque (also “bark”) is a sailboat with three or more masts, all square-rigged except the aftermast which has triangular sails

72. Peak in Thessaly OSSA
Mount Ossa in Greece is located between Mt. Pelion in the south, and the famed Mt. Olympus in the north. Mount Ossa is also known as Kissavos.

The region of Greece known as Thessaly used to be called Aeolia, and appears in Homer’s “Odyssey” under that name.

75. Brand for Carrie and Vincent? FISHER-PRICE (Carrie Fisher & Vincent Price)
The actress Carrie Fisher is most famous for playing Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” series of films. Carrie is the daughter of singer Eddie Fisher and singer/actress Debbie Reynolds.

The actor Vincent Price was best known for his roles in horror movies, and for a distinctive voice. That voice was put to great use in the famous monologue in the Michael Jackson hit song “Thriller”. Off the screen, Price was a lover of art and had a degree in art history. He founded the Vincent Price Art Museum, which is located on the East Los Angeles College campus.

77. Roadside accumulations for Hank and Tyra? SNOWBANKS (Hank Snow & Tyra Banks)
Hank Snow was a country music star from Nova Scotia. Snow regularly performed at the Grand Ole Opry, and in 1954 insisted on using a young Elvis Presley as his opening act. It was Snow who introduced Presley to Colonel Tom Parker, who famously managed Elvis for his whole singing career.

Tyra Banks is a tremendously successful model and businesswoman. Banks created and hosts the hit show “America’s Next Top Model “, and also has her own talk show. She was also the first African American woman to make the cover of the “Sports Illustrated” swimsuit issue.

83. Blood line AORTA
The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

86. 35mm camera option SLR
SLR stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

35mm was chosen at the beginning of the 20th century as a standard size for film used in still cameras. 35mm was selected as it already the standard film size for film used in motion pictures.

87. Sporty Pontiac GTO
The Pontiac GTO was was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later was found the DeLorean Motor Company.

88. “Charles in Charge” star Scott BAIO
Scott Baio is the actor who played Chachi Arcola in the great sitcom “Happy Days” and in the not so great spinoff “Joanie Loves Chachi”. Baio also played the title role in a later sitcom called “Charles in Charge”. Earlier in his career, he played another title role, in the 1976 movie “Bugsy Malone”, appearing opposite a young Jodie Foster.

89. It’s about 200 mi. S of Vesuvius MT ETNA
Mt. Etna is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Mt Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius.

91. Vacation for Billie and Tom? HOLIDAY CRUISE (Billie Holiday & Tom Cruise)
Billie Holiday was a jazz singer from Philadelphia. Holiday had a tough life, which she described in her 1956 autobiography “Lady Sings the Blues”. She recorded an album, also called “Lady sings the Blues”, that was released at the same time as the autobiography. The book was the bases of the 1972 film of the same name starring Diana Ross in the title role.

Tom Cruise’s real name is Tom Cruise Mapother IV. Cruise was born in Syracuse, New York, one of my favorite cities in the US, because that’s where I met my wife-to-be …

105. Ruth chaser of 1961 MARIS
Roger Maris (real name: Roger Maras) was the son of Croatian immigrants. It was Maris’s single season record of 61 home runs that Mark McGwire broke in in 1998 (hitting 70 that season). Maris’s own record of 61 runs (in 1961) beat the previous record of 60 set in 1927 by Babe Ruth.

111. Financial strategy for Martin and Soupy? SHORT SALES (Martin Short & Soupy Sales)
Martin Short’s father emigrated to Canada as a refugee from Ireland during the 1919-1921 Irish War of Independence. In fact, I worked closely with one of Martin’s cousins back in Ireland. Martin Short started out his career as a comedian with “SCTV” before moving to “Saturday Night Live” where he became one of the show’s most celebrated stars. Back in 1972 Short appeared in a production of “Godspell” alongside Gilda Radner. Short and Radner dated for a while, then Short started going out with Radner’s understudy, Nancy Dolman. Dolman and Short married in 1980. Any of you that follow British politics will know of Clare Short, a minister in the cabinet of former Prime Minister Tony Blair. Clare and Martin are first cousins.

Soupy Sales was a comic actor. He was most famous for his children’s TV show “Lunch with Soupy Sales. On the New Years Day show in 1965, as a joke Soupy told his young viewers to go get some “funny green pieces of paper with pictures of US Presidents” from their parents wallets and to mail them to him. The joke backfired and money started turning up in Soupy’s mail. The incident caused enough of a fuss for the TV company to suspend Sales for two weeks.

113. Book for Ellen and Ted? PAGE-TURNER (Ellen Page & Ted Turner)
Canadian actress Ellen Page came to prominence playing the female lead in the 2007 hit film “Juno”. Page also played the female lead in one of my favorite films of the past few years, 2010’s “Inception”.

Ted Turner’s big initiative in the world of business was the founding of CNN, the first 24-hour cable news channel. Turner never graduated from college as he was expelled from Brown University for having a female student in his dormitory room. Years later, in 1989, Brown awarded him an honorary B.A.

115. Für whom Beethoven wrote his “Bagatelle in A Minor” ELISE
“Für Elise” is a beautiful piece of music written by Beethoven, and is also known as “Bagatelle in A Minor”. “Für Elise” means simply “For Elise”, but sadly no one knows for sure the identity of the mysterious dedicatee.

116. Norse thunder god THOR
In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

117. Vaquero’s need REATA
“Reata” is the Spanish word for “lasso”. We tend to use the spelling “riata” in English, but sometimes can use the original Spanish word.

“Vaquero” is the Spanish word for “cowboy”.

121. Onagers, e.g. ASSES
The onager is also known as the Asiatic wild ass. The onager is a little larger than a donkey, and looks like a cross between a donkey and a horse. One characteristic of the onager is that it is remarkably “untamable”.

Down
2. Mother of Apollo and Artemis LETO
In Greek mythology, Zeus and Leto are the father and mother of the twins Apollo and Artemis. The twins are sometimes referred to as the Letoides, after their mother.

7. Vaulted recess APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

8. Classic autos REOS
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom E. Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

18. Nuke trial A-TEST
Atomic test (A-test)

33. Automaker that filed for bankruptcy in 2011 SAAB
SAAB stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. SAAB was, and still is, mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automotive division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000, who then sold it to a Dutch concern in 2010. However, SAAB (automotive) finally went bankrupt in 2011. A Chinese consortium purchased the assets of SAAB Automotive in 2012, and so SAAB vehicles are in production again. The new vehicles are using the SAAB name, but cannot use the SAAB griffin logo, the rights to which have been retained by the mother company.

34. Indian tourist city AGRA
Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India. Agra was also the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

– The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
– Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
– Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal

38. Nae like a bairn AULD
In Scottish vernacular, some not (nae) like a child (bairn) is old (auld).

41. Old-time actress Shearer NORMA
Norma Shearer was a very popular actress, especially in the thirties. She was noted for playing liberated women, so called “free souls”, and won the Best Actress Oscar for her role in “The Divorcee”. The more liberal roles disappeared for women after the introduction of the Hollywood Production Code adopted in the mid-thirties, and Shearer found herself taking on more roles in historical dramas.

43. Youngest world chess champion before Kasparov TAL
Mikhail Tal was truly a chess legend. Tal holds the record for the longest unbeaten streak in competition chess. And the second longest winning streak, well, that was by Tal as well.

Garry Kasparov is a Russian chess grandmaster and former World Chess Champion. When he first became champion in 1985 he was 22 years old, making him the youngest ever undisputed World Chess Champion. Kasparov retired in 2005 in order to pursue a career in Russian politics.

46. “America the Beautiful” lyricist Katharine Lee __ BATES
When she was 33 years old, Katharine Lee Bates took a train ride from Massachusetts to Colorado Springs. She was so inspired by many of the beautiful sights she saw on her journey that she wrote a poem she called “Pikes Peak”. Upon publication the poem became quite a hit, and several musical works were adapted to the words of the poem, the most popular being a hymn tune composed by Samuel Ward. Bates’s poem and Ward’s tune were published together for the first time in 1910, and given the title “America the Beautiful”.

47. Like Bo-Peep’s charges OVINE
The lines that are most commonly quoted for the rhyme about “Little Bo Peep” are:

Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep,
And can’t tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, And they’ll come home,
Wagging their tails behind them.

But, there are actually four more verses, including this one:

It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

48. Busybody YENTA
Yenta (also “Yente”) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater “yenta” came to mean a busybody.

51. Anthem preposition O’ER
The words “o’er the ramparts we watched” come from “The Star Spangled Banner” written by Francis Scott Key.

53. Saws with the grain RIPS
In woodworking, a cut across the grain is known as a cross cut. A cut along the grain is called a rip cut. Most saws are designed to perform the best cross cuts, but there is a special rip saw that more easily cuts straight lines along the grain.

58. Satisfy SLAKE
“To slake” is to satisfy a craving, as in slaking one’s thirst.

59. Rhyme scheme for Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” ABAAB
Robert Frost had a poem published in 1916 in which he describes the road he took in the last lines:

I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Because of these last lines, the poem is often assumed to be titled “The Road Less Traveled”. In fact, the poem’s correct name is “The Road not Taken”. Quite interesting …

61. Approximately CIRCA
“Circa” is a Latin word meaning “around, near, about the time of”. We use “circa” directly in English to mean “about the time of”, as well as in derivative words such as “circle” and “circus”.

63. Trysting places, perhaps CAFES
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

64. Prospero’s servant ARIEL
Ariel is a spirit, a character who appears in William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” and who becomes a servant of the magician Prospero. Ariel was actually viewed as a male character when the play was first staged, and the text of the play supports this assumption. Many believe that the part was originally played by a boy actor, and over time the tendency has been to use female actors, but not exclusively.

67. French dairy product LAIT
“Lait” is the French word for “milk”.

70. Poetic Muse ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of Lyric Poetry.

72. “I’ve Got a Crush __” ON YOU
“I’ve Got a Crush on You” is a jazz standard that was composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics by his brother Ira Gershwin. “I’ve Got a Crush on You” was used in two Gershwin musicals: 1928’s “Treasure Girl”, and 1930’s “Strike Up the Band”.

73. La preceder SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

77. Place up the river? STIR
The slang word “stir”, meaning a prison, probably has its roots in Start Newgate prison in London, where it was a nickname for the establishment.

The pen (penitentiary) is “up the river”. The phrase derives from the fact that Sing Sing prison (in Ossining, NY) is up the Hudson River from New York City.

80. Big ape KONG
When RKO released the 1933 movie “King Kong”, the promotional material listed the ape’s height as 50 feet. During filming, a bust was created for a 40-foot ape, as well as a full-size hand that went with a 70-foot Kong.

81. Smelting waste SLAG
The better lead ores are processed in a blast furnace, to extract the metal. The “waste” from this process is called “slag”. Slag does contain some lead and it can be processed further in a “slag furnace” to extract the residual metal. Slag furnaces also accept poorer lead ores as a raw material.

Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and of course, a greenhouse gas).

87. Belgian port city GHENT
Ghent is a city in the Flemish region of Belgium. The War of 1812 (between Britain and the US) was formally concluded with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent. The American negotiating team in Ghent included Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams.

92. Napoli’s home ITALIA
Naples (“Napoli” in Italian) is the third largest city in Italy. The name “Napoli” comes from the city’s Ancient Greek name, which translates as “New City”. That’s a bit of a paradox as today Naples is one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world.

94. Absinthe flavorings ANISES
Absinthe is an alcoholic spirit that is distilled from various plants and herbs, including “wormwood”. Absinthe was banned in the US in 1915 as it was deemed to be an addictive psychoactive drug. However, the accepted opinion today seems to be that absinthe is no more addictive or dangerous than any other spirit.

97. No longer stylish PASSE
“Passé” is a French word, meaning “past, faded”.

99. Protective Greek structures STOAS
A stoa was a covered walkway in Ancient Greece. A stoa usually consisted of columns lining the side of a building or buildings, with another row of columns defining the other side of the walkway. The columns supported a roof. Often stoae would surround marketplaces in large cities.

100. Sacher dessert TORTE
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

Sachertorte is a chocolate cake from Austria. It was specifically created in 1832 when Prince Metternich commanded his personal chef to prepare a dessert for some special guests. But his head chef became ill so the task fell to 16-year-old Franz Sacher, an apprentice in the kitchen. That teenager’s dessert is now one of Austria’s most famous dishes.

108. Genetic strands RNAS
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

109. Rodin’s thinker? TETE
In French, one’s head (tête) might produce an idea (idée).

The Rodin Museum is my favorite of all the museums in Paris. The Musée Rodin is very special in that the building and garden that hold all of the works was once Auguste Rodin’s actual home and studio. Well worth a visit if you’re in France’s City of Lights …

110. Mmes., in Málaga SRAS
The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame) and in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Homer, usually BLAST
6. Dermatologist’s concern WART
10. Short copy? REPRO
15. Considerable account SAGA
19. Home with a view AERIE
20. One-on-one sport EPEE
21. Zebra genus EQUUS
22. Passing remarks? OBIT
23. Builder hired by Sharon and James? STONEMASON (Sharon Stone & James Mason)
25. Tender reminiscence for Donna and Courtney? SUMMER LOVE (Donna Summer & Courtney Love)
27. Aquiline facial features HOOK NOSES
28. Imprint STAMP
29. Helpers AIDES
30. Having both oars in the water SANE
31. Sneaky guy? PETE
32. Clarifying Latin phrase ID EST
33. Friend of Frodo SAM
36. European destination for James and Jill? GALWAY, IRELAND (James Galway & Jill Ireland)
42. Some chalcedonies AGATES
44. Offended HURT
45. Spanish article LOS
46. “Wow!” BOY!
49. “Brava!” elicitor ARIA
50. Chisels, e.g. TOOLS
52. Rap sheet listing PRIOR
55. Roof edge EAVE
56. Play area for Lucille and Sally? BALL FIELD (Lucille Ball & Sally Field)
58. Favorite island for Eva Marie and Ricky? SAINT MARTIN (Eva Marie Saint & Ricky Martin)
60. It could be a lot ACRE
61. Television news staples CLIPS
62. Lacking ABSENT
63. Winter air CAROL
67. Good ones have straight faces LIARS
68. Flummoxed AT SEA
69. Melodious ARIOSE
71. Sailing vessels BARKS
72. Peak in Thessaly OSSA
75. Brand for Carrie and Vincent? FISHER-PRICE (Carrie Fisher & Vincent Price)
77. Roadside accumulations for Hank and Tyra? SNOWBANKS
82. Shoe widths EEES
83. Blood line AORTA
84. Pens and needles STYLI
85. __-down: post-exercise activity COOL
86. 35mm camera option SLR
87. Sporty Pontiac GTO
88. “Charles in Charge” star Scott BAIO
89. It’s about 200 mi. S of Vesuvius MT ETNA
91. Vacation for Billie and Tom? HOLIDAY CRUISE (Billie Holiday & Tom Cruise)
96. __ roll EGG
97. Cut partner PASTE
101. Melody TUNE
102. Ammunition storage site DUMP
104. Follow, as advice ACT ON
105. Ruth chaser of 1961 MARIS
106. Landing areas for some fliers HELIPORTS
111. Financial strategy for Martin and Soupy? SHORT SALES (Martin Short & Soupy Sales)
113. Book for Ellen and Ted? PAGE-TURNER (Ellen Page & Ted Turner)
114. Spot on a board SEAT
115. Für whom Beethoven wrote his “Bagatelle in A Minor” ELISE
116. Norse thunder god THOR
117. Vaquero’s need REATA
118. To be, in old Rome ESSE
119. Part of a calm-ocean simile GLASS
120. Cheek SASS
121. Onagers, e.g. ASSES

Down
1. Big party BASH
2. Mother of Apollo and Artemis LETO
3. Buck’s rear? -AROO
4. Scuttles SINKS
5. Adolescent TEENAGE
6. Sneaky one WEASEL
7. Vaulted recess APSE
8. Classic autos REOS
9. Shoe length TEN
10. One on a break RESTER
11. More than liken EQUATE
12. Beat soundly PUMMEL
13. Butcher’s cut RUMP
14. Verb ending -OSE
15. Dependable SOLID
16. Domicile ABODE
17. Yields to pressure GIVES
18. Nuke trial A-TEST
24. Like some vows MONASTIC
26. Evidence may be seized during them RAIDS
28. Rotisserie component SPIT
33. Automaker that filed for bankruptcy in 2011 SAAB
34. Indian tourist city AGRA
35. Send MAIL
37. __ milk WHOLE
38. Nae like a bairn AULD
39. Jr. and sr. YRS
40. Quite often A LOT
41. Old-time actress Shearer NORMA
43. Youngest world chess champion before Kasparov TAL
46. “America the Beautiful” lyricist Katharine Lee __ BATES
47. Like Bo-Peep’s charges OVINE
48. Busybody YENTA
51. Anthem preposition O’ER
52. Event in a rink PAIRS
53. Saws with the grain RIPS
54. Connections INS
55. In the past, in the past ERST
57. Bogus FALSE
58. Satisfy SLAKE
59. Rhyme scheme for Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” ABAAB
61. Approximately CIRCA
63. Trysting places, perhaps CAFES
64. Prospero’s servant ARIEL
65. Staircase part RISER
66. Sounds of amazement OOHS
67. French dairy product LAIT
70. Poetic Muse ERATO
71. Cold response BRR!
72. “I’ve Got a Crush __” ON YOU
73. La preceder SOL
74. Summer clothing catalog item SWIMSUIT
76. Summer cooler POOL
77. Place up the river? STIR
78. Big club ACE
79. Mark down NOTE
80. Big ape KONG
81. Smelting waste SLAG
84. Fluid-containing pouch SAC
87. Belgian port city GHENT
88. Common call enders BYES
90. Deep-fried Japanese dish TEMPURA
92. Napoli’s home ITALIA
93. Browbeating DURESS
94. Absinthe flavorings ANISES
95. Time killers IDLERS
97. No longer stylish PASSE
98. Flu symptoms ACHES
99. Protective Greek structures STOAS
100. Sacher dessert TORTE
103. Looks carefully (over) PORES
105. Strip __ MALL
106. Droll acknowledgment of a weak joke HA-HA
107. Group therapy challenges EGOS
108. Genetic strands RNAS
109. Rodin’s thinker? TETE
110. Mmes., in Málaga SRAS
112. Circ. part SEG
113. Liq. units PTS

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7 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Sep 15, Sunday”

  1. Like I said yesterday, got the theme right out of the gate (except for Mr. Galway, never heard of him or Galway, Ireland, so the junk fills around him were Naticks to me), so got a whole lot. Fairly decent effort. Made a handful of dumb mistakes (correct answers but wrong tense, or things I should have known) and a lot of it I could readily fix as I was doing the grid. But overall, ran into a lot of junk fill.

  2. A lot like yesterday – the long answers came more easily than the short ones which were really problematic. I had to guess the T at AGATES and TAL. Sometimes you get answers just via the process of elimination rather than actually knowing something.

    Overall – tougher than a lot of Sundays because of the fill. Soupy Sales? I thought he just did game shows in the 70's…

    Vincent Price and I went to the same high school….but not at the same time!!

    Best –

  3. The Rodin Museum in Paris is impressive, but closer to home the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University has about 200 Rodin works mostly in bronze, including one of the 3 original castings of The Gates of Hell. Of course the Thinker is there too in the Rodin Garden. This is all housed in a three story museum. Well worth the trip if you haven't been there already.

  4. @Piano Man
    Thanks for that tip about the Cantor Arts Center. I've never been, but it's now on "the list". We visit the beautiful Legion of Honor Museum in San Francisco quite a lot, and it also features a marvelous Rodin collection.

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