LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jake Braun
THEME: Aluminum Siding … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with the letters AL added to “the side” of one word. And, Al is the symbol for aluminium in the periodic table of the elements, so we are dealing with “aluminium siding’.

23A. Easy summer listening? BEACH ALBUM (beach bum + Al)
25A. Important exam for shady lenders? SHARK FINAL (shark fin + Al)
41A. Thoroughbreds’ annual dance? RACING FORMAL (racing form + Al)
49A. Diet for conspirators? CABAL FARE (cab fare + Al)
61A. Really bad bubbly? BRUTAL CHAMPAGNE (brut champagne + al)
78A. Lager shipping route? BEER CANAL (beer can + Al)
85A. Prayer book for kids? JUNIOR MISSAL (junior miss + Al)
104A. Last-minute jilters? ALTAR HEELS (Tar Heels + Al)
106A. Flower hater’s bugbear? PETAL PEEVE (pet peeve + Al)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 13s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. “Social contract” philosopher LOCKE
John Locke was the English philosopher who postulated that the mind was a blank slate (or “tabula rasa”) and that we filled that slate with our experiences and observations.

Central to social contract theory is the principle that an organized society has the responsibility to provide protection and welfare for its members, and the right to regulate relations between those members.

19. To be, to Bizet ETRE
Georg Bizet was a French composer active in the Romantic era. Bizet’s most famous work has to be his opera “Carmen”. “Carmen” initially received a lukewarm reception from the public, even though his fellow composers had nothing but praise for it. Sadly, Bizet died very young at only 36, before he could see “Carmen’s” tremendous success.

20. Pelican State sub PO’ BOY
A po’ boy is a submarine sandwich from Louisiana. There are a lot of theories about where the name came from, and none sound too convincing to me. A po’ boy differs from a regular submarine sandwich in that it uses Louisiana French bread, which is soft in the middle and crusty on the outside.

The official nickname of Louisiana is the Pelican State, but it is also known as the Bayou State, the Child of Mississippi, the Creole State, the Sportsman’s Paradise and the Sugar State.

22. Moneyed, in Málaga RICO
The city of Málaga is on the Costa del Sol in the South of Spain, as are the famous European tourist destinations of Torremolinos and Marbella. The Costa del Sol was made up of sleepy little fishing villages until the 1980s when the European sunseekers descended on the region. I wouldn’t recommend it for a holiday quite frankly …

28. Van Gogh setting ARLES
Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city’s design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and where he painted his famous “Cafe Terrace at Night”, as well as “Bedroom in Arles”.

29. Kadetts, e.g. OPELS
Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we’d say “estate car” in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

35. Novelist Waugh ALEC
Alec Waugh was the older brother of the more famous Evelyn Waugh. Both were successful novelists (Evelyn of “Brideshead Revisited” fame), but what I like about Alec is that he supposedly invented the cocktail party. He invited his friends around “for tea” in the twenties, and served them all rum swizzles instead!

38. Ciudad Bolívar’s river ORINOCO
The Orinoco is a major river in South America, flowing through Venezuela and Colombia.

Ciudad Bolivar is the capital city of Bolivar State in southeastern Venezuela. Ciudad Bolivar used to be called Angostura, and gave its name to the Angostura tree and Angostura Bitters which is used in many cocktails.

45. De Matteo of “The Sopranos” DREA
Drea de Matteo is an actress who is most familiar to me for playing Adriana la Cerva on HBO’s wonderful series “The Sopranos”. De Matteo also played Joey’s sister on the short-lived “Friends” spin-off called “Joey”, and the character Angie Bolen on “Desperate Housewives”.

46. Black dog LAB
The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814. The breed comes in three registered colors: black, yellow and chocolate.

47. King dog CUJO
“Cujo” is a Stephen King horror novel, which means that I have never read it (I don’t do horror). The character Cujo is a rabid St. Bernard dog which besieges a young couple for three days in their stalled car. King tells us that he lifted the dog’s name from real life, as Cujo was the nickname of Willie Wolfe, one of the men responsible for the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst by the Symbionese Liberation Army.

49. Diet for conspirators? CABAL FARE (cab fare + Al)
A cabal is a small group of secret plotters, perhaps scheming against a government or an individual.

51. Celestial altar ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for “altar”.

55. Nutritional figs. RDAS
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and are a set of recommendations for the standard daily allowances of specific nutrients. RDAs were effectively absorbed into a broader set of dietary guidelines in 1997 called Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs). RDIs are used to determine the Daily Values (DV) of foods that are printed on nutrition fact labels on most food that we purchase.

56. “Cheers” role SAM
On the sitcom “Cheers”, barman Sam Malone was played by Ted Danson. Malone was a retired relief pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, and a recovering alcoholic. Great show …

57. “Cheers” order ALE
The wonderful sitcom “Cheers” ran for eleven seasons on NBC, from 1982 to 1993. “Cheers” spawned an equally successful spin-off show called “Frasier”, which also ran for eleven seasons and often featured guest appearances of characters from the original “Cheers”. The Cheers bar was styled on the Bull & Finch Pub in Boston (in which I’ve had a pint of Guinness two!). The owner of the Bill & Finch cleverly agreed to the initial interior and exterior shots, charging only one dollar. Since then he has made millions from selling “Cheers” memorabilia, and also from increased trade.

58. Island setting for the 10th season of “Survivor” PALAU
Palau is a tiny island nation lying 500 miles east of the Philippines, and 2,000 miles south of Japan. Palau was once a Spanish possession and was sold by Spain to Germany in the late 19th century. During WWI, Japan invaded the islands (as Japan had declared war on Germany) and was awarded the islands as a territory by the League of Nations at the end of hostilities. In WWII the US took Palau from the Japanese in a bloody battle in 1944. Palau emerged from American administration in 1994 and is now a sovereign state.

The reality show “Survivor” is based on a Swedish television series created in 1997 called “Expedition Robinson”.

61. Really bad bubbly? BRUTAL CHAMPAGNE (brut champagne + al)
“Brut” is a word meaning “dry” that is used to classify some wines, especially champagnes. The term is French in origin, in which language it means “raw, crude”.

Sparkling wines can be classified according to sweetness. These classifications are, from driest to sweetest:

– Brut Nature
– Extra Brut
– Brut
– Extra Dry
– Dry
– Semi-Dry
– Sweet

65. Inept shepherd BO-PEEP
The lines that are most commonly quoted for the rhyme about “Little Bo Peep” are:

Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep,
And can’t tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, And they’ll come home,
Wagging their tails behind them.

But, there are actually four more verses, including this one:

It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

69. Gettysburg Campaign VIP LEE
The Gettysburg Campaign was a series of battles fought in June and July of 1863 during the American Civil War. The campaign started with Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia invading Maryland and Pennsylvania, and ended with Lee’s escape back to Virginia after being defeated by Union troops led by the Major General George G. Meade at the Battle of Gettysburg.

73. Adidas competitor AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

The brand name Adidas dates back to when Adolf “Adi” Dassler started making his own sports shoes in his mother’s laundry room in Bavaria after returning from WWI. With his brother, Adi founded Dassler shoes. The company’s big break came in 1936 at the Berlin Olympics, when Adi persuaded American sprinter Jesse Owens to use his shoes, and with the success of Jesse Owens came success for the fledgling shoe company. After WWII the brothers split, acrimoniously. Adi’s brother, Ru-dolf Da-ssler, formed “Ruda” shoes (later to become Puma), and Adi Das-sler formed “Adidas”.

74. Horse of the Year, 1960-’64 KELSO
There is a list of the top 100 US thoroughbred horses of the 20th century maintained by “The Blood-Horse” magazine. Numbers 1-4 on the list are:

1. Man o’War
2. Secretariat
3. Citation
4. Kelso

75. City SSW of Seville CADIZ
Cádiz is a port city in southwestern Spain, in the autonomous community of Andalusia. Cádiz is a remarkable city geographically, in that it sits on a thin spit of land that juts out into the sea.

The city of Seville is the capital of Andalusia in southern Spain. Seville is a favored setting for many operas including “The Barber of Seville” by Rossini, “Fidelio” by Beethoven and Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” and “The Marriage of Figaro”.

77. Old studio letters RKO
The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

78. Lager shipping route? BEER CANAL (beer can + Al)
Lager is so called because of the tradition of cold-storing the beer during fermentation. “Lager” is the German word for “storage”.

81. Ones wrapping around a pole? ELVES
Santa’s elves are wrapping a lot of gifts at Christmas time, up at the North Pole.

82. Casual top POLO
René Lacoste was a French tennis player who went into the clothing business, and came up with a more comfortable shirt that players could use. This became known as a “tennis shirt”. When it was adopted for use in the sport of polo, the shirts also became known as “polo shirts”. And then the “golf shirt” is basically the same thing.

85. Prayer book for kids? JUNIOR MISSAL (junior miss + Al)
Missals came into being in medieval times and were used primarily by priests and ministers. A missal is a book containing all the texts necessary for the celebration of Mass through the liturgical year. Nowadays missals are used by the congregation and not just by the celebrants. The term “missal” comes from the Latin for “Mass book”.

90. Memorable 1893 defendant BORDEN
Lizzie Borden was a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts who was tried and acquitted for the axe murders of her father and stepmother in 1892. After Borden was acquitted, the authorities decided not to charge anyone else with the murders, which contributed to Borden being ostracized by the citizens of Fall River. Despite being shunned by society, Borden lived out the rest of her days in Fall River. There’s a celebrated rhyme relating to the affair, which was used by children when skipping rope:

Lizzie Borden took an ax
And gave her mother forty whacks.
When she saw what she had done,
She gave her father forty-one.

93. Follower MINION
A minion is a servile follower, a yes-man. The term “minion” comes from the French word “mignon” meaning “favorite, darling”.

94. Boxster maker PORSCHE
The Boxster is a roadster built by Porsche that was introduced in 1996. The name “Boxster” comes from a melding of “boxer” and “roadster”. A “boxer” engine (or “flat” engine) is one in which the pistons move in a horizontal plane, with the cylinders laid out in two rows opposing each other.

98. Rustle (up) SCARE
To “rustle up” or “scare up” something is to find it by searching, by using some effort.

100. 2000s NCAA president __ Brand MYLES
Myles Brand served as president of the University of Oregon from 1989 to 1994, and the president of Indiana University from 1994 to 2002. He then served as president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) from 2002 until his death in 2009.

101. Shinto temple entrance TORII
A torii is a very traditional Japanese gate, often seen at the entrance to a Shinto shrine.

It is perhaps best not to describe Shinto as a religion, but more as a “spirituality of the Japanese people”, a spirituality that encompasses folklore, history and mythology. Having said that, “Shinto” translates literally as “Way of the Gods”. Most people in Japan who are described as practicing Shinto, also practice Buddhism.

103. General Arnold of WWII HAP
Henry “Hap” Arnold was the Commanding General of the US Army Air Corps during the Second World War. Before the war, Arnold was taught to fly by the Wright Brothers. After the war, Arnold was one of the co-founders of Pan American Airways, but opted not to become president of the company and instead remained in the military.

104. Last-minute jilters? ALTAR HEELS (Tar Heels + Al)
To “jilt” someone with whom you have a relationship is to drop them suddenly or callously. “Jilt” is an obsolete noun that used to mean “harlot” or “loose woman”.

Tar Heel is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the nickname also of the athletic teams of the University of North Carolina. No one seems to know for sure where the term “Tar Heel” originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

106. Flower hater’s bugbear? PETAL PEEVE (pet peeve + Al)
The phrase “pet peeve”, meaning “thing that provokes one most”, seems to be somewhat ironic. A “peeve” is a source of irritation, and the adjective “pet” means “especially cherished”.

A bugbear is a character from English folklore, a goblin in the form of a bear who was said to eat naughty children. Our contemporary bugbear is less scary and is simply something that is annoying or irritating.

108. Old Nair rival NEET
The hair removal product “Neet” was launched in Canada in 1901, and was also sold as “Immac”. Today it is sold under the name “Veet”.

Nair is a hair removal product that has some pretty harsh ingredients. The most important active constituents are calcium hydroxide (“slake lime”) and sodium hydroxide (“caustic soda”). Other Nair components seem to be there to soothe the skin after the harsher chemicals have done their job. The name “Nair” probably comes from combining “no” and “hair”.

110. Fail to say ELIDE
“To elide” is to pass over, omit or slur a syllable when speaking.

115. Luau music makers UKES
The ukulele (“uke”) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

Down
1. Concrete-reinforcing rod REBAR
A steel bar or mesh that is used to reinforce concrete is called “rebar”, short for “reinforcing bar”.

2. ’90s “SNL” regular Cheri OTERI
Cheri Oteri was the SNL cast member who regularly appeared with Will Farrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

4. Triple __ SEC
Triple sec is liqueur made from the dried peels of bitter and sweet oranges. I tend to use it in cocktails calling for Grand Marnier or Cointreau, as it is a cheaper alternative and tastes very similar …

7. Chartres cleric ABBE
“Abbé” is the French word for “abbot”.

Chartres is in north-central France, lying about 60 miles southwest of Paris. The city is perhaps best known for its magnificent Gothic cathedral.

8. Board game with cheese-shaped tokens MOUSE TRAP
Mouse Trap is a board game that was introduced in 1963 by the Ideal Toy Company. The game is based on drawings created by Rube Goldberg.

9. British novelist Barbara PYM
Barbara Pym was an English novelist who was known in the 1950s for her social novels “Excellent Women” and “Glass of Blessings”. Pym’s writing career floundered for almost twenty years until an article in “The Times Literary Supplement” named her “the most underrated writer of the 20th century”. That same year (1977), Pym was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and her new novel “Quartet in Autumn” was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.

10. Electric guitar innovator LES PAUL
Les Paul was a guitarist, songwriter and inventor. When he was 33 years old, Paul was involved in a near-fatal car crash that left his right arm and elbow shattered. Surgeons offered him the choice of amputation or a rebuilding of the limb that would leave him unable to bend his elbow. He told them to set his arm at just under 90 degrees so that he could at least hold his guitar and perhaps play it.

13. White wine apéritifs KIRS
Kir is a French cocktail, made by adding a teaspoon or so of creme de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife (expensive tastes!) is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

14. Theologian who opposed Luther ECK
During the Protestant Reformation in the 16th and 17th centuries, as Martin Luther was attacking the policies of the Catholic Church, Johann Eck was one of the leading defenders of Catholicism. The two had public debates, with Luther generally coming out ahead.

16. Cocktail invented in Puerto Rico PINA COLADA
“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into “strained pineapple”. The Piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

17. Trendy berry ACAI
Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

24. Rockers Van __ HALEN
Van Halen is a heavy metal band formed in Pasadena, California back in 1972. Brothers Eddie and Alex Van Halen originally called the band Mammoth, changing the name to Van Halen in 1974 when they found out there was another Mammoth playing the circuit. Early on, the brothers were renting a sound system from David Lee Roth, and they decided to save some money by bringing him into the band and saving on the rental fee!

29. Beatles nonsense syllables OB-LA
“Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” was one of many songs credited to Lennon/McCartney that was actually written by just one of the pair. Paul McCartney wrote this one, a song that John Lennon really did not like at all. Apparently Lennon was quite obstructionist during the recording of the song and even walked out at one point.

39. Chip, Skip or Harry of broadcasting CARAY
Chip Caray is a sportscaster who covers Atlanta Braves baseball. He is following in the footsteps of his sportscaster father Skip Caray, and his grandfather Harry Caray.

43. Poll man GALLUP
The Gallup company is best known for its public opinion polls. The company was founded by George Gallup in 1935 as the American Institute of Public Opinion.

45. Block, beaver-style DAM UP
Beavers build dams so that they can live in and around the slower and deeper water that builds up above the dam. This deeper water provides more protection for the beavers from predators such as bears. Beavers are nocturnal animals and do all their construction work at night.

53. Large mackerel WAHOO
The wahoo is a cousin of the mackerel, and is known as the “ono” in Hawaii.

54. Actor Ladd ALAN
The last few years of actor Alan Ladd’s life were pretty rough. In 1962 he was found unconscious in a pool of blood with a bullet wound in his chest, an abortive suicide attempt. Two years later he was found dead, apparently having succumbed to an accidental overdose of drugs and sedatives. He was 50 years old.

58. Patients’ main MDs, to insurers PCPS
Primary care physician (PCP)

59. AARP concern AGEISM
AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

60. Santa __ Valley: California wine region YNEZ
The Santa Ynez Valley is a winegrowing region in Santa Barbara County in California. The Santa Ynez Valley was the setting and location for the wonderful 2004 film “Sideways”.

64. Electric guitar wood ALDER
There appears to be heated debate by those in the know, about whether or not the type of wood used in the construction of electric guitars makes a difference to the sound quality. However, amongst those that value of wood choice, alder is the clear favorite.

65. Spiked cakes BABAS
Rum baba (also “baba au rhum” in French) is a small yeast cake saturated in rum, and sometimes filled with whipped cream. Rum baba is derived from the recipe for the tall “babka” yeast cake that was introduced to the world by the Polish communities. The Polish words “baba” and “babka” mean “old woman” or “grandmother” in English. I guess someone must have thought that all grandmothers were saturated in rum!

71. Norman’s home: Abbr. OKLA
Norman, Oklahoma is located just a few miles south of Oklahoma City. The city was named for Abner Norman from Kentucky, who first surveyed the area for the federal government. Norman is home to the University of Oklahoma, founded there in 1890.

76. Romance novel publisher AVON
Avon was a noted publisher of comic books and paperbacks. The company was founded in 1941, and focused on pretty lowbrow literature designed for popular appeal.

79. Barrel maker COOPER
A cooper is a craftsman who makes wooden vessels, such as barrels. The term “cooper” ultimately derives from the Latin “cupa” meaning “tub, cask”.

80. Hot-and-cold fits AGUE
An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

81. Prefix with morph ENDO-
The psychologist William Herbert Sheldon proposed a now-discredited theory that a person’s intelligence, future achievement and temperament could be associated with particular body types. Sheldon proposed three “somatotypes”, a classification that is still used today:

Ectomorphic: thin body build
Mesomorphic: muscular and sturdy body build
Endomorphic: heavy body build

82. Three-pronged letters PSIS
The Greek letter psi is the one that looks a bit like a trident or a pitchfork.

85. Generic trendsetters JONESES
The phrase “keep up with the Joneses” was popularized by the comic strip called “Keep up with the Joneses” that first appeared in American newspapers in 1913. The eponymous “Jones” family never appeared in person in the strip, but were referred to constantly,

86. “Redemption” author URIS
Leon Uris’ 1995 novel “Redemption” is a sequel to the very successful 1976 book “Trinity”. “Trinity” is set in Ireland in the period from the famine up to the Easter Rising in 1916. “Redemption” takes characters from “Trinity”, and tells of their emigration from Ireland to New Zealand after the rebellion.

89. PNC Park player PIRATE
PNC Park is the home to the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team. The park is sponsored by PNC Financial Services, the sixth largest bank in the US, and founded and based in Pittsburgh.

94. Where to see many El Greco works PRADO
“El Greco” (“the Greek”, in Spanish) was the nickname of the artist whose real name was Domenikos Theotokopoulos. El Greco was born in Crete in 1541, and moved to Venice to study art when he was in his early twenties. A few years later he moved to the city of Toledo in central Spain, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life.

The Museo del Prado is in Madrid, the capital of Spain, and has one of the finest art collections in the world. The gallery’s most famous work is “Las Meninas” By Velazquez.

96. Le __, France HAVRE
Le Havre is a city on the mouth of the river Seine on the northwest coast of France. The city’s name translates as “the haven”.

97. Pentathlon blades EPEES
The original pentathlon of the ancient Olympic games consisted of a foot race, wrestling, long jump, javelin and discus. When a new pentathlon was created as a sport for the modern Olympic Games, it was given the name the “modern pentathlon”. First introduced in 1912, the modern pentathlon consists of:

– pistol shooting
– épée fencing
– 200m freestyle swimming
– show jumping
– 3 km cross-country running

98. Painting medium SAND
Sandpainting, also called “drypainting”, is an artform in which colored sands are used to make images or designs on a surface.

99. “Pinocchio” goldfish CLEO
In the 1940 Disney animated feature “Pinocchio”, the woodcarver Geppetto has two pets. He has a tuxedo cat named Figaro and goldfish named Cleo.

102. Publisher Chandler OTIS
Otis Chandler took over as publisher of the “Los Angeles Times” in 1960 from his father Norman Chandler. Otis retired from his position in 1980.

105. ENVY and OMEN laptops HPS
The giant multinational called HP (originally Hewlett-Packard) was founded in 1939 with an investment of $538, in a one-car garage in Palo Alto, California by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard. The company name would have been Packard-Hewlett if Dave Packard had won a coin toss!

107. Water under le pont EAU
In French, water (eau) flows under a bridge (pont).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Seriously deteriorates ROTS
5. Item sold in sheets STAMP
10. “Social contract” philosopher LOCKE
15. Pit-__ A-PAT
19. To be, to Bizet ETRE
20. Pelican State sub PO’ BOY
21. Behavioral guide ETHIC
22. Moneyed, in Málaga RICO
23. Easy summer listening? BEACH ALBUM (beach bum + Al)
25. Important exam for shady lenders? SHARK FINAL (shark fin + Al)
27. “I have to go out!” ARF!
28. Van Gogh setting ARLES
29. Kadetts, e.g. OPELS
30. “Let me repeat … ” I SAID …
31. Mixes, as cards RIFFLES
33. Set out EMBARK
35. Novelist Waugh ALEC
36. Wrath IRE
37. Record player STYLUS
38. Ciudad Bolívar’s river ORINOCO
41. Thoroughbreds’ annual dance? RACING FORMAL (racing form + Al)
45. De Matteo of “The Sopranos” DREA
46. Black dog LAB
47. King dog CUJO
48. Calm ALLAY
49. Diet for conspirators? CABAL FARE (cab fare + Al)
51. Celestial altar ARA
52. Substitute for a bad word BLEEP
53. Reheats WARMS
55. Nutritional figs. RDAS
56. “Cheers” role SAM
57. “Cheers” order ALE
58. Island setting for the 10th season of “Survivor” PALAU
59. Words to a captain AYE AYE
61. Really bad bubbly? BRUTAL CHAMPAGNE (brut champagne + al)
65. Inept shepherd BO-PEEP
68. Biker’s invite HOP ON
69. Gettysburg Campaign VIP LEE
70. Dairy sight COW
73. Adidas competitor AVIA
74. Horse of the Year, 1960-’64 KELSO
75. City SSW of Seville CADIZ
77. Old studio letters RKO
78. Lager shipping route? BEER CANAL (beer can + Al)
81. Ones wrapping around a pole? ELVES
82. Casual top POLO
83. Crescent piece ARC
84. Prayer starter O GOD …
85. Prayer book for kids? JUNIOR MISSAL (junior miss + Al)
88. Leave for a bit STEP OUT
90. Memorable 1893 defendant BORDEN
91. “__ a pity” ‘TIS
92. Ready to eat RIPE
93. Follower MINION
94. Boxster maker PORSCHE
98. Rustle (up) SCARE
100. 2000s NCAA president __ Brand MYLES
101. Shinto temple entrance TORII
103. General Arnold of WWII HAP
104. Last-minute jilters? ALTAR HEELS (Tar Heels + Al)
106. Flower hater’s bugbear? PETAL PEEVE (pet peeve + Al)
108. Old Nair rival NEET
109. Draft recipient PAYEE
110. Fail to say ELIDE
111. Spread measure ACRE
112. Two caplets, say DOSE
113. They may follow teams SLEDS
114. Do a lawn repair job RESOD
115. Luau music makers UKES

Down
1. Concrete-reinforcing rod REBAR
2. ’90s “SNL” regular Cheri OTERI
3. Accident consequence, perhaps TRAFFIC JAM
4. Triple __ SEC
5. Just-in-case item SPARE
6. Part of a traveler’s budget, perhaps TOLLS
7. Chartres cleric ABBE
8. Board game with cheese-shaped tokens MOUSE TRAP
9. British novelist Barbara PYM
10. Electric guitar innovator LES PAUL
11. End of a list OTHERS
12. Attribute, with “up” CHALK
13. White wine apéritifs KIRS
14. Theologian who opposed Luther ECK
15. Gotten up ARISEN
16. Cocktail invented in Puerto Rico PINA COLADA
17. Trendy berry ACAI
18. Related TOLD
24. Rockers Van __ HALEN
26. Like sons and daughters FILIAL
29. Beatles nonsense syllables OB-LA
32. Cold, to Carlos FRIO
34. “Oh dear!” MY MY!
35. Specialty AREA
37. Only SOLE
38. Jupiter and Saturn ORBS
39. Chip, Skip or Harry of broadcasting CARAY
40. Quite big OBESE
41. Some TVs RCAS
42. Surrounding glow AURA
43. Poll man GALLUP
44. Company cars, as a group FLEET
45. Block, beaver-style DAM UP
49. Stuff CRAM
50. For nothing FREE
52. Wearing nothing BARE
53. Large mackerel WAHOO
54. Actor Ladd ALAN
58. Patients’ main MDs, to insurers PCPS
59. AARP concern AGEISM
60. Santa __ Valley: California wine region YNEZ
61. Endure BEAR
62. Leading AHEAD
63. Take it easy LOLL
64. Electric guitar wood ALDER
65. Spiked cakes BABAS
66. Hardly secret OVERT
67. Per-unit pay scales PIECE RATES
70. Verify with several sources CROSS-CHECK
71. Norman’s home: Abbr. OKLA
72. Winter fabric WOOL
74. Stomach discomfort KNOT
75. Customers CLIENTELE
76. Romance novel publisher AVON
79. Barrel maker COOPER
80. Hot-and-cold fits AGUE
81. Prefix with morph ENDO-
82. Three-pronged letters PSIS
85. Generic trendsetters JONESES
86. “Redemption” author URIS
87. “Let __!”: “Get going!” IT RIP
89. PNC Park player PIRATE
90. Charged BILLED
93. “Not a chance!” MY EYE!
94. Where to see many El Greco works PRADO
95. No longer squeaky OILED
96. Le __, France HAVRE
97. Pentathlon blades EPEES
98. Painting medium SAND
99. “Pinocchio” goldfish CLEO
100. One of a daily trio MEAL
102. Publisher Chandler OTIS
105. ENVY and OMEN laptops HPS
106. Distribution word PER
107. Water under le pont EAU

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3 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 15, Sunday”

  1. A lot easier than the last 2 grids. Still haven't managed to finish one of these unaided or without errors, but got 3/4 of it this time without having to do anything other than correct a handful of errors, most of them natural for not figuring out the crosses (LCDS instead of RCAS for example). Of course, the grid setter tries to get cute with the theme answers (so they don't make sense in light of the clue), so I have to get those on the crosses.

    Overall, a decent experience though, and at least a little sign that (I hope) I'm getting better.

  2. A little tougher than a normal Sunday, but I thought some of the themed answers were clever.

    I remember the first time I used an HP calculator and learned their "RPN" (reverse Polish notation) way of entering data. That was about 35 years ago, and I still always use their calculators and still believe that their RPN way of entering data and doing multiple calculations is the best way…even though it never really caught on anywhere else.

    Pina Coladas are great on vacation, but my new favorite beach drink is the Bahama mama (rum, coconut rum, grenedine, OJ, and pineapple juice).

    I was at the Bull and Finch when the Cardinals won the 2006 World Series. That is my one and only memory of it, but it was a great one.

    Best –

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