LA Times Crossword Answers 25 Nov 15, Wednesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Victor Barocas
THEME: Body and Soul … each of today’s themed answers comprises two words. The first word often follows BODY, and the second word often follows SOUL:

65A. Wholeheartedly, or words that can precede the first and second parts, respectively, of 17-, 31- and 49-Across BODY AND SOUL

17A. Yorkshire pudding or bangers and mash ENGLISH FOOD (“body English” & “soul food”)
31A. Game-ending declaration CHECKMATE (“body check” & “soul mate”)
49A. Genre of the ’60s hits “Pipeline” and “Wipe Out” SURF MUSIC (“body surf” & “soul music”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Perfume compound ESTER
Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic. Fats and oils found in nature are fatty acid esters of glycerol.

11. Sailor TAR
A Jack Tar, or just “tar”, was a seaman in the days of the British Empire. The term probably arose due to a sailor’s various uses of tar back then, including waterproofing his clothes and using tar in his hair to slick down his ponytail.

14. Off-the-cushion shot CAROM
A carom is a ricochet, the bouncing of some projectile off a surface. Carom has come to mean the banking of a billiard ball, the bouncing of the ball off the side of the table.

15. Usually multilayered dessert TORTE
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

17. Yorkshire pudding or bangers and mash ENGLISH FOOD (“body English” & “soul food”)
The term “body English” describes the movement that someone might make to influence the movement of an object that has already been propelled. One might watch a golfer’s body English after he or she tees off and yells “go left, go left!”

Yorkshire Pudding is made from the same batter that is used to make pancakes. The batter is fried in oil, usually fat collected from a roast joint of lamb or beef. Although there’s no reason to believe that the dish was invented in Yorkshire in the north of England, the folks in Yorkshire do tend to eat the pudding differently than in other parts of the country. Usually the pudding is served alongside a roast meat, whereas in Yorkshire it served separately before the main course.

19. Sundial topper XII
Our word “noon”, meaning “midday”, comes from the Latin “nona hora” that translates as “ninth hour”. Back in Ancient Rome, the “ninth hour” was three in the afternoon. Over the centuries, traditions such as church prayers and “midday” meals shifted from 3 p.m. to 12 p.m., and so “noon” became understood as 12 noon.

20. Classic Belafonte song opening DAY-O
“Day-O (The Banana Boat Song)” is a traditional folk song from Jamaica. It is sung from the standpoint of dock workers unloading boats on the night shift, so daylight has come, and they want to go home. The most famous version of “Day-O” was recorded by Harry Belafonte, in 1956.

22. Homeric classic ILIAD
“Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

24. Where heros are made DELI
The plural of the word “hero” is “heroes”. That said, when the term is used for the name of a sandwich, then the plural “heros” is quite common.

28. Sufferer healed by Jesus LEPER
The horrible disease known as leprosy is also called Hansen’s disease, named after the Norwegian physician famous for isolating the bacterium that causes the disease. We can use the term “leper” to mean someone in general who is shunned by society.

31. Game-ending declaration CHECKMATE (“body check” & “soul mate”)
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be “in check”. If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in “checkmate” and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce “check!”) so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn’t occur.

35. Bledel of “Gilmore Girls” ALEXIS
Alexis Bledel is an actress from Houston, Texas who is best known for playing one of the title characters in TV’s “Gilmore Girls”. In the show, Bledel plays the daughter of single mother Lorelai Gilmore, played by Lauren Graham.

38. Where billions live ASIA
Most of the world’s population lives in Asia (60%), and Asia is the largest continent in terms of landmass (30% of the world). Asia also has the highest population density (246 people per square mile), and the most populous city on the continent is Shanghai, China.

40. Lightweight shirts CAMISES
A camise is just that, a loose shirt or tunic.

44. Ellington’s “Take __ Train” THE A
The A Train in the New York City Subway system runs from 207th Street, through Manhattan and over to Far Rockaway in Queens. The service lends its name to a jazz standard “Take the ‘A’ Train”, the signature tune of Duke Ellington and a song much sung by Ella Fitzgerald. One version of the lyrics are:

You must take the A Train
To go to Sugar Hill way up in Harlem
If you miss the A Train
You’ll find you’ve missed the quickest way to Harlem
Hurry, get on, now, it’s coming
Listen to those rails a-thrumming (All Aboard!)
Get on the A Train
Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem.

46. “Et alia” lang. LAT
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

49. Genre of the ’60s hits “Pipeline” and “Wipe Out” SURF MUSIC (“body surf” & “soul music”)
“Pipeline” is a 1962 instrumental song released by the Chantays. The song is named for the Banzai Pipeline surf reef break in Hawaii. “Pipeline” was to be the only hit for the Chantays.

The Banzai Pipeline is an area where the waves start to break off Ehukai Beach on Oahu’s North Shore. The spot was given its name in 1961 by a movie producer filming surfers. At that time there was an underground pipeline being constructed nearby, so the producer named the surf reef break “Pipeline”. The “Banzai” was added to the name in honor of Banzai Beach, where the waves comes ashore.

“Wipe Out” is a 1963 instrumental released by the Surfaris.

52. Wyoming’s __ Range TETON
Grand Teton National Park is located just south of Yellowstone NP, and a must-see if you are visiting the latter. The park is named after the tallest peak in the magnificent Teton Range known as Grand Teton. The origins of the name “Teton” is not very clear, although my favorite story is that it was named by French trappers, as the word “tetons” in French means “breasts”!

53. Benjamin of “Law & Order” BRATT
The actor Benjamin Bratt’s most noted role has to be Detective Rey Curtis on the NBC cop show “Law & Order”. Bratt dated the actress Julia Roberts for a few years.

54. Ibuprofen target ACHE
Ibuprofen is a shortened version of the drug’s name Iso-BUtyl-PROpanoic-PHENolic acid. It’s actually an anti-inflammatory, but apparently it is good for headaches too.

58. Capital south of Lillehammer OSLO
Lillehammer, Norway hosted the Winter Olympic Games in 1994. The ‘94 Winter Games were the first to be held two years after the Summer Olympics, and so took place only two years after the ‘92 Games, held in Albertville, France.

60. Ottawa-based law gp. RCMP
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Mounties; RCMP) is an unusual police force in that it provides all policing for the whole country. The RCMP works on the national level, and right down to the municipal level. The force’s distinctive uniform of red serge tunic, blue pants with a yellow stripe, stetson hat etc. is known internally as “Review Order”. The red uniform dates back to the days of the North-West Mounted Police, which was one of the existing forces that were merged in 1920 to form the RCMP.

69. Actress Téa LEONI
Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film “A League of Their Own” (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played Sam Malone’s fiancée on “Cheers” and opposite Adam Sandler in “Spanglish”. My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in “Fun with Dick and Jane”. Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

70. “Inferno” poet DANTE
Dante Alighieri’s “Divine Comedy” is an epic poem dating back to the 14th century. The first part of that epic is “Inferno”, which is the Italian word for “Hell”. In the poem, Dante is led on a journey by the poet Virgil, starting at the gates of Hell on which are written the famous words “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here”.

72. Diving ocean birds ERNES
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

Down
4. Low-tech card file ROLODEX
The name Rolodex is short for “rolling index”, and applies to a device that was invented back in 1956. Even in today’s world that is run by computers, Rolodexes are still popular.

5. “No more details, please” TMI
Too much information! (TMI)

7. Low on the Mohs scale SOFT
The Mohs scale of mineral hardness was developed in 1812 by Friedrich Mohs. Basically Mohs took minerals and scratched them with other minerals. In this way he was able to determine which minerals were hardest (most scratch resistant) and which softest.

9. WWII area ETO
General Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII.

13. Senator Harry REID
Democrat Harry Reid was the Senate Majority leader from 2007 until 2015. Reid had a big day in the Senate from a Democratic perspective with the successful passage of the so-called ObamaCare Bill. Paradoxically, Harry Reid’s wife was in hospital at the time, having broken her back in a car accident. Reid took over as Senate Majority leader from Republican Bill Frist who retired from politics in 2007. He was replaced in 2015 by Republican Mitch McConnell.

18. Sun, in Sonora SOL
Sonora is the state in Mexico that lies just south of the borders with Arizona and New Mexico. Sonora is the second-largest state in the country, after Chihuahua.

23. Peru’s largest city LIMA
Lima is the capital city of Peru. Lima was founded in 1535 by the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro, who named it “la Ciudad de los Reyes” (the City of Kings). He chose this name because the decision to found the city was made on January 6th, the feast of the Epiphany that commemorates the visit of the three kings to Jesus in Bethlehem.

25. With 2-Down, “Hulk” star ERIC
(2D. See 25-Down BANA)
Eric Bana is an Australian actor who enjoyed a successful career in his home country before breaking into Hollywood playing an American Delta Force sergeant in “Black Hawk Down”. A couple of years later he played the lead in Ang Lee’s 2003 movie “The Hulk”, the role of Dr Bruce Banner. More recently he played the Romulan villain Nero, in the 2009 “Star Trek” movie.

29. Philanthropist Yale ELIHU
Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

30. “Everybody Loves Raymond” actor PETER BOYLE
The actor Peter Boyle’s best-known roles were as Raymond’s father Frank Barone on the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond”, and as the monster in the Mel Brooks movie “Young Frankenstein”.

32. French-speaking island country HAITI
The Republic of Haiti occupies the smaller, western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean. The rest of the island is taken up by the Dominican Republic. Haiti is one of only two nations in the Americas to have French as an official language, the other being Canada.

36. Pierre’s toast SALUT!
In French, “salut” means “hi” and is less formal than “bonjour”. The term can also be used as a friendly toast.

41. Elephant ancestor MASTODON
Mastodons were large mammals that were related to the modern elephant. Mastodons roamed the forest of North and Central America until they became extinct about 10,000 to 11,000 years ago. Their extinction is believed to have come about due to a rapid change in climate.

42. Son of Adam SETH
According to the Bible, Seth was the third son of Adam and Eve, coming after Cain and Abel. Seth is the only other child of Adam and Eve who is mentioned by name. According to the Book of Genesis, Seth was born after Cain had slain his brother Abel.

51. French port on the Strait of Dover CALAIS
Calais is a major ferry port in northern France that overlooks the Strait of Dover, which is the narrowest point in the English Channel. The strait is just over 20 miles wide, making Calais the nearest French town to England.

59. Word sung after the ball drops SYNE
The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve, the words of which were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

The famous New Year’s Eve ball-dropping tradition in Times Square, New York started on January 1st 1908. The original time ball was lit with one hundred 25-watt light bulbs and was dropped at one second after midnight. A fifth version of the ball was introduced in 2008 for the centennial anniversary of the ceremony. The 2008 ball was built by Waterford Crystal and was lit by 9,567 LED bulbs that consumed the same amount of power as ten electric toasters. The current ball was used for the first time in 2009, and is double the size of the 2008 ball at 12 feet in diameter. The ball now sits atop Times Square year round, so you can go see it next time you are in town.

67. Canine doc’s deg.? DDS
Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)

The canine teeth of a mammal are also called the eye teeth. The name “canine” is used because these particular teeth are very prominent in dogs. The name “eye” is used because in humans the eye teeth are located in the upper jaw, directly below the eyes.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Stop the launch ABORT
6. Perfume compound ESTER
11. Sailor TAR
14. Off-the-cushion shot CAROM
15. Usually multilayered dessert TORTE
16. Load off one’s mine? ORE
17. Yorkshire pudding or bangers and mash ENGLISH FOOD (“body English” & “soul food”)
19. Sundial topper XII
20. Classic Belafonte song opening DAY-O
21. Not tricked by ONTO
22. Homeric classic ILIAD
24. Where heros are made DELI
26. __ button PANIC
28. Sufferer healed by Jesus LEPER
31. Game-ending declaration CHECKMATE (“body check” & “soul mate”)
35. Bledel of “Gilmore Girls” ALEXIS
37. Creative output ART
38. Where billions live ASIA
39. Watch someone’s kids SIT
40. Lightweight shirts CAMISES
43. Television SET
44. Ellington’s “Take __ Train” THE A
46. “Et alia” lang. LAT
47. Letter-erasing key DELETE
49. Genre of the ’60s hits “Pipeline” and “Wipe Out” SURF MUSIC (“body surf” & “soul music”)
52. Wyoming’s __ Range TETON
53. Benjamin of “Law & Order” BRATT
54. Ibuprofen target ACHE
56. Trapdoor location FLOOR
58. Capital south of Lillehammer OSLO
60. Ottawa-based law gp. RCMP
64. Not in the clergy LAY
65. Wholeheartedly, or words that can precede the first and second parts, respectively, of 17-, 31- and 49-Across BODY AND SOUL
68. __ well OIL
69. Actress Téa LEONI
70. “Inferno” poet DANTE
71. Opposite of post- PRE-
72. Diving ocean birds ERNES
73. Prince Charming’s mount STEED

Down
1. More than just passed ACED
2. See 25-Down BANA
3. Frenzied revelry ORGY
4. Low-tech card file ROLODEX
5. “No more details, please” TMI
6. Sharing a common culture ETHNIC
7. Low on the Mohs scale SOFT
8. Highway officers TROOPERS
9. WWII area ETO
10. Symbol of losses RED INK
11. Dead weight in a portfolio TOXIC ASSET
12. Opera number ARIA
13. Senator Harry REID
18. Sun, in Sonora SOL
23. Peru’s largest city LIMA
25. With 2-Down, “Hulk” star ERIC
27. Did something ACTED
28. Endures LASTS
29. Philanthropist Yale ELIHU
30. “Everybody Loves Raymond” actor PETER BOYLE
32. French-speaking island country HAITI
33. Connect with TIE TO
34. Consumed EATEN
36. Pierre’s toast SALUT!
41. Elephant ancestor MASTODON
42. Son of Adam SETH
45. __-American AFRO
48. Ogles obliquely LEERS AT
50. Sculptor’s medium MARBLE
51. French port on the Strait of Dover CALAIS
55. Sell a bridge to, say? CON
56. Producer’s nightmare FLOP
57. Hideaway LAIR
59. Word sung after the ball drops SYNE
61. Construction area marker CONE
62. Remote button MUTE
63. Begged PLED
66. Not ‘neath O’ER
67. Canine doc’s deg.? DDS

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12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 25 Nov 15, Wednesday”

  1. Idiot me forgot that I was crossing into the Pacific time zone yesterday, so I have an hour or two to kill. Pretty easy grid again.

    Here's some shots of the Banzai Pipeline, along with the song by the Chantays. Everyone from Dick Dale to The Ventures to Stevie Ray Vaughn covered it. And I think everyone's heard at least part of Wipeout by the Surfaris.

  2. Another quicky. I did this more quickly than yesterday's puzzle. I'm hoping for some toughies tomorrow, Friday and Saturday. We'll see.

    @Vidwan
    Laughed at the CPA firm story yesterday as well. Reminds me of a Seinfeld scene where George's medical tests came back "negative" so he thought he was dying.

    I should have said this yesterday, but I made the Einstein theory of general relativity reference yesterday because today is the 100 year anniversary of his presenting of that paper. It came a decade or so after his theory of special relativity was published.

    I've always been fascinated by Einstein so it has always bothered me the myth that he was so bad at math that he failed it in high school (or whenever). Truth is he was a math prodigy from an early age. Those stories are just myths created by someone who failed a math class I assume.

    Fun fact about today: Google maps reports that at least in my city of Houston the most queried destinations on this day before Thanksgiving are liquor stores. Don't blame me. I know where they all are so I'm not the one googling them…

    Best –

  3. very nice and a relatively easy puzzle. I had fun with Mr. Barocas handiwork … or handiwerke, in german.

    I visited the Tetons, three times when we stayed at Jackson Hole, Wy. The Tetons were just next door, and we also made a canoe trip downriver to watch the peaks from only 20 miles away…. Jackson Hole is a city only for rich, rich, rich people – every thing is very expensive, and very chic. If you stay there for more than a week, you learn to detest affluenze, and the corruption of wealth, and turn into a committed Leninist Marxist communist. Fortunately, we stayed there only 6 days, each time. How did we finance or weasel ourselves into these trips ? Don't ask.

    I had Mammoths ( a letter short – ) before Mastodons, and VDS ( Veterinary Doctors) before DDS. I wonder if they call them VD's ??

    Moh's scale of hardness has many problems, it's an ordinal scale that is totally non-linear and is not equally graded. There are many materials softer than the number one (talc), and some materials harder than 10 ( diamond). Silicon Carbide, a manmade material, of which I have many, many samples is a 9.5 to 9.9 and could even scratch some diamonds. Its not quite logical, and not used in true scientific studies. There are other much better scales for hardness.

    Happy Holidays, all.

  4. Thought this was easy for a Thursday.

    Grandchildren day got switched so it feels like Thursday, but the turkey's not cooked yet!

    Happy puzzling!

    Bella

  5. HAITI was in, then it was out, then it was in again.
    Heart and Soul didn't fit. Erase,erase,erase.
    Spelled LEONI LEONE, so I didn't cross-check spelling of CALAIS.
    Fellow puzzle solvers, I don't get TOXIC WASTE.In a portfolio??
    Wha?
    I thought Lou Ferrigno was the Hulk.
    Willie D- fabulous surfing clip. Have to have nerves of steel to try that! Wow!
    I thought that once we set our clocks to standard time in CA that we were the same as AZ. Nope.
    If you have to travel, be safe everyone.
    Happy Thanksgiving tomorrow.

  6. @Pookie

    Well start with what an ASSET is. It's an item that you own that has exchange value. A stock, a bond, gold, silver. Hopefully you can follow from there.

    Now add the word TOXIC to that, it means something that has fallen so significantly in value due to market forces that the item can not be sold at a price satisfactory to the holder for what they have put into it. This is distinguished from a simple depreciated asset in that there is some condition in place which makes ownership of the asset distasteful and rendering it into a non-asset. Hence, TOXIC.

    Hope that helps explain it.

  7. Very clever theme.

    Do not know who ALEXIS or ERIC BANA are probably because of age (mine vs. theirs).

    My sister who flips property calls those parcels which keep costing more money to repair or have some environmental curse on them as TOXIC ASSETs.

  8. At the risk of adding accounting jargon and mumbo-jumbo, I will try to explain a TOXIC ASSET. As mentioned above, an Asset is something of value …. Cash (or cash equivalents, like Bills, notes, accounts receivable etc.), then precious metals, inventory, machinery, buildings and finally Goodwill…. all on a balance sheet, strictly in the order of liquidity. The most liquid is ofcourse, cash etc.

    Now, if you buy a building for one million, and put down a down-payment of 100,000 and a bank finances a mortgage of 900,000. If, because of a downturn or a recession in the economy, the building can't be sold for, say, more than 500,000 then :

    a) you lost your downpayment entirely, and
    b) the bank also lost 400,000 ( which is 900k minus 500k). Now, in most cases the bank comes after you and your additional collateral from elsewhere for the money they lost, but its not always possible.

    The bank carries the loan at 900k, because the banks don't like to show losses, But, under conservative accounting rules, they HAVE to recognise the UNREALIZED ( assuming the property has not yet been sold – ) LOSS right away. Now, add all such losses for the bank for the hundreds of properties in this condition – and this is all TOXIC ASSETS…. and the big problem they is, how to get rid of them – because they make the bank look bad, and lose the faith of the shareholders and the depositors.

    By the way, depreciation is a man made, accountant manipulated, periodic reduction of an ASSET – mainly to reduce the tax bill. In the United Arab Emirates, where there are no income taxes – or taxes of any kind – there is no need for any depreciation. This is another complicated subject.

    T M I.

  9. @Glenn "an item that you own that has exchange value".
    Not owning any stocks I never looked at the word that way. Assets I thought were a PLUS.
    Thank you for taking the time and energy to explain this for me. I appreciate your help.
    In my thinking TOXIC ASSET is an oxymoron. ^0^
    @Vidwan Thank you too for a very logical explanation.
    There could NEVER be too much information from you!
    I appreciate the time you took to write this out for me.
    We have some very intelligent contributors here at Bill's blog, which is one thing that I am THANKFUL for.
    Happy Thanksgiving to all, and BTW I'm making meatballs and sauce tomorrow. It's only the two of us and my husband's not crazy for turkey, which is OK by me!

  10. Hi all!
    Once again my paper went missing and had to do this thing online. I won't complain, tho. Paper goes missing about once a week lately. At least I'm getting better at managing the online version of the puzzle.
    Didn't know what the heck CAMISES is. I just typed in the Spanish for shirts – camisas – and changed the one letter.
    It is interesting when you don't know if a clue is asking for a proper name or a more general term. That happened to me with LEPER…oh no! I need a Bible name!! — but I did get Seth.
    Love surf music! Fender Telecasters!!
    Thanksgiving at Pacific Dining Car. $66 a person! My friend says we can order one dinner to split and they don't mind. We'll see. That would indeed be something to give thanks for 😀
    Be well~~™

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