LA Times Crossword Answers 8 Nov 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jim Holland
THEME: Short Changes … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common phrase, but with a short-E sound changed to a short-A sound:

23A. Trio in a leather factory? THE THREE TANNERS (from “The Three Tenors”)
37A. Riffraff lacking direction? RABBLE WITHOUT A CAUSE (from “Rebel Without a Cause”)
50A. Place to raise simians? MONKEY RANCH (from “monkey wrench”)
70A. “Leave tiny bugs alone!”? DON’T SWAT THE SMALL STUFF (from “don’t sweat the small stuff”)
92A. Encouragement for a sailing maneuver? TACK SUPPORT (from “tech support”)
103A. Swap headgear with the priest? PUT A FATHER IN YOUR CAP (“put a feather in your cap”)
125A. Moderate building expansion? LIMITED ADDITION (from “limited edition”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Perennial ’90s-’00s presidential candidate NADER
Ralph Nader has run as a third-party candidate for the office of President of the United States four times now, in every election from 1996 to 2008. Nader’s name was first first linked with the presidential race in 1971, when the famous Dr. Benjamin Spock offered to stand aside as candidate in the 1972 race if Nader would agree to run, but he declined.

6. Artist van __ GOGH
Vincent Van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who seems to have had a very tortured existence. Van Gogh only painted for the last ten years of his life, and enjoyed very little celebrity while alive. Today many of his works are easily recognized, and fetch staggering sums in auction houses. Van Gogh suffered from severe depression for many of his final years. When he was only 37, he walked into a field with a revolver and shot himself in the chest. He managed to drag himself back to the inn where he was staying but died there two days later.

10. Pear type BOSC
Bosc is a cultivar of the European Pear grown in the northwest of the United States. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck. I always seem to use the potato as my point of reference. How Irish am I …?

20. Fencing tool EPEE
The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, both of which are also thrusting weapons. However, the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

21. Choral part ALTO
In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word “alto” describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term “contralto” describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male’s voice (not a boy’s) with the same range as an alto is called a “countertenor”.

23. Trio in a leather factory? THE THREE TANNERS (from “The Three Tenors”)
The Three Tenors were Placido Domingo, Jose Carreras and Luciano Pavarotti (RIP). The famous trio first performed together in Rome in a concert on the eve of the 1990 FIFA World Cup Final, which was hosted that year by Italy. That concert was recorded and released as “Carreras Domingo Pavarotti in Concert”, which became the best-selling classical album of all time.

26. Start of a historic B-29 name ENOLA
The Enola Gay was the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb, on Hiroshima in August 1945. Enola Gay was the name of the mother of pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr.

28. Techie on “24” CHLOE
One of the few characters in the television show “24” that wasn’t killed off was Chloe O’Brien, the abrasive computer scientist played by Mary Lynn Rajskub. IN the real world, the Department of Homeland Security has a development program aimed at protecting airliners from missile attacks. It is called Project CHLOE, after the character on “24”. Apparently the show was a favorite of former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff.

31. Witticism MOT
“Bon mot” translates from French as “good word”. We use “bon mot” (and sometimes just “mot”) to mean a quip, a witticism.

32. Pub. VIPs EDS
There are lots of editors (eds.) in the world of publishing (pub.).

34. Tout’s territory, initially OTB
Off-Track Betting (OTB) is the legal gambling that takes place on horse races outside of a race track. A betting parlor can be referred to as an OTB.

A “tout” (mainly in the British Isles) is someone who checks out racehorses and sells information gained to people placing bets.

37. Riffraff lacking direction? RABBLE WITHOUT A CAUSE (from “Rebel Without a Cause”)
“Rebel Without a Cause” is a 1955 drama movie, famously starring actor James Dean who died just before the film’s release. The title comes from a 1944 book by psychiatrist Robert M. Lindner “Rebel Without a Cause: The Hypnoanalysis of a Criminal Psychopath”, although the content of the book has no bearing on the movie’s storyline. The three lead actors in the movie all died tragically, and while relatively young:

– James Dean (24), in a car crash in 1955
– Sal Mineo (37), in a stabbing in 1976
– Natalie Wood (43), in a drowning in 1981

45. Org. with an online Patriot Index DAR
In order to be a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), an applicant has to prove that she is a descendant of someone closely associated with, and supportive of, the American Revolution. The DAR maintains an online database of Revolutionary War patriots. The database is searchable, and is known as the Patriot Index.

46. Deli pockets PITAS
Pita is a lovely bread in Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita is usually round, and has a “pocket” in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools. The pockets were a big hit in the seventies when someone came up with the idea of using them for fillings hence creating pita sandwiches or “pita pockets”.

50. Place to raise simians? MONKEY RANCH (from “monkey wrench”)
“Simian” means “pertaining to monkeys or apes”, from the Latin word “simia” meaning “ape”.

59. Coll. prep test PSAT
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)

60. Song of praise PAEAN
A paean is a poem or song that expresses triumph or thanksgiving. “Paean” comes from the ancient Greek “paian” meaning “song of triumph”.

62. ” … o’er the dew of __ high eastward hill”: Shak. YON

But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,
Walks o’er the dew of yon high eastward hill.

The above are lines from William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”.

65. SEC overseer NCAA
The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is an athletic conference comprised mainly of schools in the southeastern US. The SEC was founded back in 1932 with a roster of thirteen schools, ten of which are still members of the conference.

68. Bend at a barre PLIE
The French word for “bent” is “plié”. In the ballet move known as a plié, the knees are bent.

A “barre” is a handrail used by ballet dancers for warm-up exercises and to provide support when practicing certain moves.

69. Game-winning combination O-O-O
When I was growing up in Ireland we played “noughts and crosses” … our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

78. ’90s Saturn maker SEGA
The Sega Saturn was a video game console that was sold in the latter half of the 1990s. It was the successor to the Sega Genesis, but never matched the sales of its predecessor.

82. Counts’ equals EARLS
In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquess. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquess and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known simply as a countess.

92. Encouragement for a sailing maneuver? TACK SUPPORT (from “tech support”)
“To tack” is a sailing term, meaning to veer into and through the wind in order change course, resulting in the wind coming over the opposite side of the vessel after the tack is completed.

98. Gobs SALTS
“Gob” is a slang term for a sailor, and it may derive from a slang term for chewing tobacco, itself a derivative of the slang term for a mouth, a “gob”.

101. Most sylvan WOODIEST
A sylvan area is wooded, covered in trees. “Silva” is the Latin word for “forest”.

109. Loan letters APR
Annual percentage rate (APR)

112. Controversial war zone, briefly NAM
By some definitions, the official involvement of Americans in the Vietnam War started in 1955. At that time, President Eisenhower deployed a Military Assistance Advisory Group to assist in the training of the South Vietnamese Army. American involvement in the conflict officially ended in 1973 with the signing of an agreement that came out of the Paris Peace Accords.

113. Entrepreneur-helping gp. SBA
The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency with the mission of assisting small businesses. The SBA doesn’t give loans itself, but it does act as a guarantor under the right circumstances. The SBA was set up in 1953, and isn’t a favorite with fiscal conservatives.

128. Engraved pillar STELE
Stelae (singular “stele” or “stela”) were used all over the world, sometimes as territorial markers and sometimes to commemorate military victories. In later times stelae were commonly erected as commemorative markers in graveyards or other religious sites.

129. Joyce’s home ERIN
Regular readers will know that I am unashamedly supportive of my native Irish culture, but I have to tell you that I can’t handle the works of James Joyce. I have spent many a fine day traipsing around Ireland learning about his life, but I have yet to appreciate one of his books. To me, his life is more absorbing than his writing. Having said that, “Ulysses” is an interesting novel in that it chronicles just one ordinary day in the life of a Dubliner named Leopold Bloom. There’s a huge celebration of “Ulysses” in Dublin every year on June 16th, called Bloomsday. The festivities vary from readings and performances of the storyline, to good old pub crawls. “Ulysses” was made into a film of the same name in 1967 starring Milo O’Shea.

134. Barrie’s bosun SMEE
In J. M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook’s pirates and is Hook’s right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being “Irish” and “a man who stabbed without offence”. Nice guy! Captain Hook and Smee sail on the pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

A boatswain works on the deck of a boat. A boatswain is unlicensed, and so is not involved in the navigation or handling of the vessel. He or she has charge of the other unlicensed workers on the deck. Boatswain is pronounced “bosun” and this phonetic spelling is often used interchangeably with “boatswain”. The contraction “bos’n” is also very popular.

Down
1. N.L. part: Abbr. NATL
National League (NL, of baseball).

2. Court icon Arthur ASHE
Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African American player to be so honored. Ashe continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979 Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

4. “The Lord of the Rings” race ENTS
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth in his series of books “The Lord of the Rings”. “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

7. Cartel acronym OPEC
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) was founded in 1960 at a conference held in Baghdad, Iraq that was attended by Iraq, Kuwait, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Nine more countries joined the alliance soon after, and OPEC set up headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland and then Vienna, Austria in 1965. The basic aim of OPEC was to wrench control of oil prices from the oil companies and to put it in the hands of the sovereign states that own the natural resource.

A “cartel” is a group of independent businesses who cooperate to regulate production, pricing and marketing of their common product(s).

10. Undoing BANE
Today we tend to use the word “bane” to mean anathema, a source of persistent annoyance. A few centuries ago, a bane was a cause of harm or death, perhaps a deadly poison.

11. Corrida cheer OLE!
Spanish bullfighting is known locally as “corrida de toros”, literally “race of bulls”.

13. Kind of ray or dust COSMIC
Cosmic rays aren’t actually rays at all. They are high energy particles that originate in outer space outside of our solar system. Cosmic rays interact with atoms in our atmosphere creating secondary particles that can reach the Earth’s surface.

Cosmic dust is usually defined as the space dust that exists in our solar system. These dust particles mainly originate from comets and asteroids in our system, but can also be interstellar dust particles that are just “passing through” from other solar systems.

15. Author Deighton LEN
I used to walk my dog right past author Len Deighton’s house years ago, as we lived in the same village in Ireland (probably my only claim to fame!). Deighton wrote the excellent espionage thriller “The IPCRESS File”, made into a 1965 movie starring Michael Caine.

16. Beatles’ title lyric that follows “With love” FROM ME TO YOU
“From Me to You” is a 1963 song by the Beatles that was a hit in the UK. A cover version by Del Shannon made it into the American charts. So, “From Me to You” was the first Lennon & McCartney song to chart in the US, but it wasn’t performed by the Beatles.

17. Northern abode IGLOO
The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar: namely “igdlo”.

25. Nary a soul NOBODY
The adjective “nary” means “not one”, as in “nary a soul”.

38. Wally of cookie fame AMOS
Wally Amos was a talent agent, one who was in the habit of taking home-baked cookies with him as an enticement to get celebrities to see him. He was urged by friends to open a cookie store (the cookies were that delicious, I guess) and this he did in Los Angeles in 1975 using the name “Famous Amos”. The store was a smash hit and he was able build on the success by introducing his cookies into supermarkets. The brand was eventually bought up making Wally a rich man, and Famous Amos cookies are still flying off the shelf.

39. Org. with antlers on its logo BPOE
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868, and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a “club” in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren’t welcome.

42. Syr. and Eg., once UAR
The United Arab Republic (UAR) was a union between Egypt and Syria made in 1958 and dissolved in 1961 when Syria pulled out of the arrangement.

48. Ibn, in Arabic names SON OF
In Arabic names, “ibn” is a word meaning “son of”. The words “bin” and “ben” are also used for “son of”. The word “bint” means “daughter of”. Similarly, in Hebrew “ben” is used to mean “son of”, and “bat” is used to mean “daughter of”.

51. “Critique of Pure Reason” author KANT
Immanuel Kant was an 18th-century, German philosopher. Kant published “Perpetual Peace” in 1795, laying out what he believed were conditions for ending all wars and creating a lasting peace. The good news for us is that one of these conditions was to have a world full of constitutional republics, so it seems we are on the right track here in the US!

52. Sketch opening ETCH A …
Etch A Sketch was introduced in 1960. The toy was developed in France by inventor André Cassagnes.

53. California tourist area near Santa Rosa NAPA
The first commercial winery in Napa Valley, California was established way back in 1858. However, premium wine production only dates back to the 1960s, with the region really hitting the big time after its success at the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976. The story of that famous blind wine tasting is told in the entertaining 2008 film “Bottle Shock”.

Santa Rosa is the largest city in California’s Wine Country, and the county seat of Sonoma County. The epicenter of the so-called 1906 San Francisco Earthquake was located near Santa Rosa, so there was actually more damage in Santa Rosa, for the size of the city, than there was in San Francisco.

55. Ethiopia’s Selassie HAILE
Emperor Haile Selassie I ruled Ethiopia until he was removed from power in a revolution in 1974. Selassie died in 1975 under suspicious circumstances and it is widely believed that he was assassinated.

58. Calais cup TASSE
Calais is a major ferry port in northern France that overlooks the Strait of Dover, which is the narrowest point in the English Channel. The strait is just over 20 miles wide, making Calais the nearest French town to England.

66. Former nuclear agcy. AEC
The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was set up right after WWII in 1946, with the aim of promoting the peaceful use of atomic energy. Establishing the AEC was a significant move made by President Truman, as it passed control of atomic energy from the military to the civilian sector. The AEC continued to operate until 1974 when its functions were divided up into two new agencies: the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

70. Extinct birds DODOS
The dodo was a direct relative of the pigeon and dove, although the fully-grown dodo was usually three feet tall. One of the reasons the dodo comes to mind when we think of extinction of a species, is that it disappeared not too long ago and humans were the reason for its demise. The dodo lived exclusively on the island of Mauritius and when man arrived, we cut back the forests that were its home. We also introduced domestic animals, such as dogs and pigs, that ransacked the dodo’s nests.

71. Catherine of “Best in Show” O’HARA
Catherine O’Hara is an actress and comedienne from Toronto, Ontario. One of O’Hara’s more famous film roles is Kevin’s mother in the Christmas classic “Home Alone”.

“Best in Show” is comedy film released in 2000 that is in the mockumentary style. It follows five entrants to a big dog show. It is a Christopher Guest film, so I gave up after about 10 minutes of viewing …

72. Awards since 1901 NOBEL PRIZES
The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded “in memory of Alfred Nobel”. Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and that award is presented in Oslo.

73. Indian shrine site AGRA
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the third wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child.

74. Powder source TALC
Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

75. New car letters MSRP
Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP)

86. NFL analyst Aikman et al. TROYS
Troy Aikman used to play quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Now that he is retired from football, Aikman works as a sportscaster on the Fox network.

89. Colorado’s __Verde National Park MESA
Mesa Verde National Park is in Colorado. Mesa Verde is home to ancient cliff dwellings built by the Puebloan people, also know as the Anasazi.

91. Actor Erwin STU
Stu Erwin played the title role of Joe Palooka in the 1934 movie “Palooka”, but the film’s star was the great Jimmy Durante. In fact, the movie was released in the UK as “The Great Schnozzle”.

94. Web discussion venue USENET
Remember the good old days, when you read messages online in “newsgroups”? Well, that system of aggregating public messages is known as Usenet, and it’s still around today. Usenet started operating in 1980, some ten years before the World Wide Web was introduced (which system has displaced Usenet in terms of popularity). Usenet definitely played a significant part in the history of the Internet. For instance, the terms “FAQ” and “spam” were both born on Usenet.

97. Auto performance brand STP
STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

108. Introduction to a madam? I’M ADAM …
The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

– Able was I ere I saw Elba
– A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
– Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite words is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

110. 1492 vessel PINTA
Famously, Christopher Columbus used three ships in his first voyage across the Atlantic: the Santa Maria, the Niña and the Pinta. The Pinta was the fastest of the three, and it was from the Pinta that the New World was first spotted, by a sailor named Rodrigo de Triana who was a lookout on the fateful day. Pinta was a nickname for the ship that translated as “the painted one”. The Pinta’s real name has been lost in mists of time.

119. Westernmost Aleutian island ATTU
Attu is the westernmost island in the Aleutian chain, and so is the westernmost part of Alaska. Japanese forces took the island in October 1942, eventually landing as many as 2,900 soldiers there. In May 1943, the US Army retook the island in twenty days of fighting that is now called the Battle of Attu, the only land battle to take place on US soil during WWII. I am very proud of my father-in-law, who served in the Aleutians in WWII …

122. Bygone blade SNEE
“Snick or snee” is the name given to cut and thrust while fighting with a knife. The phrase is rooted in a pair of Dutch words and it gave its name to a “snee”, a light sword-like knife.

124. __-de-France ILE
Île-de-France (literally “Island of France”) isn’t an island at all. It is the name given to the most populous of France’s 26 administrative regions. Île-de-France is roughly equivalent to the Paris metropolitan area.

127. Sandra who played Gidget DEE
The actress Sandra Dee started out as a model before moving into film. After a promising start to her career it seemed to peter out, and the public became more interested in her 7-year marriage to Bobby Darin. And of course she will forever be remembered from the song in the movie and stage-show “Grease” called “Look at Me, I’m Sandra Dee”.

“Gidget” is an early “beach-party film” that was released in 1959. The movie stars Sandra Dee as a teenage girl who falls in love with a young surfer. The surfer’s gang gives the young lass the nickname “Gidget”, a portmanteau of “girl” and “midget”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Perennial ’90s-’00s presidential candidate NADER
6. Artist van __ GOGH
10. Pear type BOSC
14. Fairylike ELFIN
19. How two hearts may beat AS ONE
20. Fencing tool EPEE
21. Choral part ALTO
22. Transitional point VERGE
23. Trio in a leather factory? THE THREE TANNERS (from “The Three Tenors”)
26. Start of a historic B-29 name ENOLA
27. Car user, perhaps LESSEE
28. Techie on “24” CHLOE
29. “You said it!” AMEN!
31. Witticism MOT
32. Pub. VIPs EDS
34. Tout’s territory, initially OTB
35. Mixes STIRS
36. Farm sound MOO
37. Riffraff lacking direction? RABBLE WITHOUT A CAUSE (from “Rebel Without a Cause”)
44. Take advantage of, in a way IMPOSE ON
45. Org. with an online Patriot Index DAR
46. Deli pockets PITAS
49. Nitwit BOOB
50. Place to raise simians? MONKEY RANCH (from “monkey wrench”)
56. Aria, for one SOLO
57. Religious faction SECT
59. Coll. prep test PSAT
60. Song of praise PAEAN
62. ” … o’er the dew of __ high eastward hill”: Shak. YON
63. Common batteries AAS
65. SEC overseer NCAA
68. Bend at a barre PLIE
69. Game-winning combination O-O-O
70. “Leave tiny bugs alone!”? DON’T SWAT THE SMALL STUFF (from “don’t sweat the small stuff”)
77. “Gotcha!” OHO!
78. ’90s Saturn maker SEGA
79. Put-ons ACTS
80. Biblical verb ending -ETH
81. Slight amount DAB
82. Counts’ equals EARLS
84. Former “formerly” ERST
87. Appear to be SEEM
90. Silver sources ORES
92. Encouragement for a sailing maneuver? TACK SUPPORT (from “tech support”)
96. Fires AXES
98. Gobs SALTS
100. Expressions of pleasure AHS
101. Most sylvan WOODIEST
103. Swap headgear with the priest? PUT A FATHER IN YOUR CAP (“put a feather in your cap”)
109. Loan letters APR
111. Colorful marble AGATE
112. Controversial war zone, briefly NAM
113. Entrepreneur-helping gp. SBA
114. DI doubled MII
115. Succumb to flattery MELT
116. Word in many music genres METAL
118. More than concerns ALARMS
123. Open, in a way UNZIP
125. Moderate building expansion? LIMITED ADDITION (from “limited edition”)
128. Engraved pillar STELE
129. Joyce’s home ERIN
130. Election lead-in RACE
131. Coal __ STOVE
132. Made less harsh EASED
133. Deli call NEXT!
134. Barrie’s bosun SMEE
135. Homebound student, perhaps TUTEE

Down
1. N.L. part: Abbr. NATL
2. Court icon Arthur ASHE
3. Bucks’ partners DOES
4. “The Lord of the Rings” race ENTS
5. Cobbles, in a way REHEELS
6. Whiz start GEE
7. Cartel acronym OPEC
8. Really start selling GET HOT
9. __ insurance HEALTH
10. Undoing BANE
11. Corrida cheer OLE!
12. Layers STRATA
13. Kind of ray or dust COSMIC
14. Ties, as a score EVENS UP
15. Author Deighton LEN
16. Beatles’ title lyric that follows “With love” FROM ME TO YOU
17. Northern abode IGLOO
18. “Cool!” NEATO!
24. Exchange for cash REDEEM
25. Nary a soul NOBODY
30. Big band, for one ERA
33. Descend suddenly SWOOP
35. One may be over your shoulder STRAP
37. Kid RIB
38. Wally of cookie fame AMOS
39. Org. with antlers on its logo BPOE
40. Maneuverable tractor brand BOBCAT
41. Lodging locales INNS
42. Syr. and Eg., once UAR
43. Family nickname SIS
47. Above it all ALOOF
48. Ibn, in Arabic names SON OF
51. “Critique of Pure Reason” author KANT
52. Sketch opening ETCH A …
53. California tourist area near Santa Rosa NAPA
54. Block component CELL
55. Ethiopia’s Selassie HAILE
58. Calais cup TASSE
61. Fits one inside the other NESTS
64. Word before pants, shirts or socks SWEAT
66. Former nuclear agcy. AEC
67. __ in the right direction A STEP
70. Extinct birds DODOS
71. Catherine of “Best in Show” O’HARA
72. Awards since 1901 NOBEL PRIZES
73. Indian shrine site AGRA
74. Powder source TALC
75. New car letters MSRP
76. Up in __: uncertain THE AIR
83. Glide along SKATE
85. Planted SOWN
86. NFL analyst Aikman et al. TROYS
88. Corp. VIP EXEC
89. Colorado’s __Verde National Park MESA
91. Actor Erwin STU
93. Sound of silence? SHH!
94. Web discussion venue USENET
95. “Sorry that didn’t work out” TOO BAD
97. Auto performance brand STP
99. Ended for good, with “out” STAMPED
102. Believer in a pair of opposed eternal principles DUALIST
104. Mature AGE
105. Cast out of heaven FALLEN
106. Getup ATTIRE
107. Some critics RATERS
108. Introduction to a madam? I’M ADAM …
109. Entertain AMUSE
110. 1492 vessel PINTA
116. Hotel pillow topper MINT
117. Make more potent, in a way LACE
119. Westernmost Aleutian island ATTU
120. Million laughs RIOT
121. Game play MOVE
122. Bygone blade SNEE
124. __-de-France ILE
126. Cookbook direction MIX
127. Sandra who played Gidget DEE

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5 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 8 Nov 15, Sunday”

  1. Not relatively bad on this one compared to my normal efforts. 7 errors and lookups total, 5 on a 5×4 square of the grid. Of course with these grids, the cute stuff they pull always is annoying, not to mention the junk fill.

    At least though it's not an effort I'm ashamed of like last week.

  2. To wit, with these kinds of grids, how do you figure out the theme answers? That's probably the biggest difficulty I have, and ultimately have to cross all of them to have a shot. It's okay when it's something like all theme answers have "NTH" in them, but when they start getting "cute" as I termed it (like today's grid and most of these, and ALL of Merl Reagle's I've seen – which happens to be particularly annoying), how do you get from a clue to something sensible?

    Like: How do you get from "Short Changes" to "each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common phrase, but with a short-E sound changed to a short-A sound"? I got lucky on this grid and actually crossed the first two out in very short order, so actually had some clue of what kind of nonsense to look for, but still had difficulty with the clues.

    Last week's was very similar, but actually had that grid come crashing down exactly because I couldn't get the theme answers past the two I guessed there.

    I guess it's kind of frustrating in a lot of ways since this is exactly what's keeping me from doing these Sunday grids as well as I could probably be. (not seeing any real good advice either)

  3. Wow – did both Saturday and Sunday's puzzle today. It took me quite awhile to read both blogs which made me realize just how long it must take Bill to RESEARCH AND WRITE these things on a daily basis. I suppose we're all guilty of taking what you do for granted at times, Bill, but thanks for all your hard work.

    Very UK-ish puzzle e.g. TOUT was new to me among other things.

    @Carrie
    From Saturday's puzzle – 35A. I assume you missed it so I'll put it here: "Like sparkling wine", and the answer was ABUBBLE…..Don't shoot the messenger!

    One very interesting example of a cosmic ray are muons or more correctly mu-mesons. They are created when particles hit our atmosphere at near the speed of light. They are the same charge as an electron but have 206 times the mass. Sometimes they are called heavy electrons.

    What is interesting (if anyone is still awake reading this..) is that based on their speed and rate of decay (muons only live a couple of microseconds), we should be able to predict their distribution within the atmosphere. But far more make it to the surface of the earth than should be able to – even if they were traveling right at the speed of light. However, if we take into account the predictions of special relativity (moving clocks run slow), the numbers align. Time actually runs more slowly for a muon so they travel farther because time is slowed for them. Essentially, time is a variable but the speed of light isn't. Scientists view this phenomenon or "proof" of special relativity every day.

    Best –

  4. @Jeff, not to worry, I won't shoot! I finally did see that A-bomination, and I just don't think the puzzle gods are hearing me!!
    Be well~~™

  5. Did this puzzle this morning and it really came together without too much angst. After I finally figured out that 5 Down "Cobbles in a way" was not "resoled" then the problem I was having with the NW corner resolved. I thought 116 Down "Hotel pillow topper" was pretty clever as the answer to that clue is typically "sham" and the use of "mint" was a good switch.

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