LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Mark Bickham
THEME: Misaligned … each of today’s themed answers is “OFF CENTER”, has the letters OFF in the CENTER:

121A. Misaligned … or, literally, a perfectly aligned aspect of seven answers in this puzzle OFF CENTER

21A. Place of business THE OFFICE
23A. Powerful display SHOW OF FORCE
39A. Recidivists REPEAT OFFENDERS
48A. Olive branch PEACE OFFERING
93A. Red Label spirits SMIRNOFF VODKA
102A. Clique CIRCLE OF FRIENDS
119A. Vivien Leigh’s last film SHIP OF FOOLS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 16m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Time to hang on? … A SEC
Hang on a sec …

9. Trunk hardware HASP
Back in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, steamer trunks were the equivalent of our modern carry-on bags. They were containers for clothes and other belongings that had flat tops and low profiles so that they could fit under a bunk on a steamer (steam ship) or on a train. Steamer trunks usually contained a passenger’s essentials, with the bulk of the items stored in the main luggage.

19. NFL Titan, before 1999 OILER
The Houston Oilers were an AFL charter team, founded in 1960. The team moved to Tennessee in 1997, and became the Tennessee Titans in 1999.

25. 49-Down counterpart: Abbr. SOR
Sorority (sor.)

28. Sics on LETS AT
“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

31. Comic Jay MOHR
Jay Mohr is an American actor, one I most remember playing a supporting role in the wonderful HBO series “From the Earth to the Moon” (must see TV!). Mohr also created and hosted a reality show called “Last Comic Standing”.

36. U.S. govt. broadcaster VOA
The United States Information Agency (USIA) was established under President Eisenhower in 1953, and continued operating until 1999. It’s mission was “public diplomacy”, another term for propaganda broadcast over radio airwaves. The intent from day one was to avoid having the broadcasts identified as propaganda, and speaking as a former listener to the USIA’s Voice of America (VOA) over in Europe, there were a lot of fun programs that had one coming back to hear more, but we all knew it was propaganda quite frankly …

38. Mandlikova of ’80s tennis HANA
Hana Mandlikova is a former professional tennis star from Czechoslovakia. Mandlikova won four Grand Slam titles and then retired in 1990, at the ripe old age of 28.

42. Louise __, National Book Award winner for “The Round House” ERDRICH
“The Round House” is a 2012 novel by Louise Erdrich. The round house in the title is a spiritual place on Indian reservation land, the site of a brutal rape.

45. Empire with provinces called suyu INCA
The Inca Empire was known as the Tawantinsuyu, which translates as “land of the four quarters”. The Inca Empire was a federal organization having a central government that sat above four “suyu” or “quarters”, four administrative regions.

46. Superman nemesis Luthor LEX
Lex Luthor is the arch-nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

47. Hebrew for “skyward” EL AL
El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. The term “el al” translates from Hebrew as “to the skies”.

51. Still being tested, as software IN BETA
In the world of software development, the first tested issue of a new program is usually called the “alpha” version. Expected to have a lot of bugs that need to be fixed, the alpha release is usually distributed to a small number of testers. After reported bugs have been eliminated, the refined version is called a “beta” and is released to a wider audience, but with the program clearly labeled as “beta”. The users generally check functionality and report further bugs that are encountered. The beta version feeds into a release candidate, the version that is tested just prior to the software being sold into the market, bug-free. Yeah, right …

53. Objectivism advocate Rand AYN
Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born Alisa Rosenbaum. Her two best known works are her novels “The Fountainhead” published in 1943 and “Atlas Shrugged” from 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, “Atlas Shrugged”. This group called itself “The Collective”, and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan.

The philosophy of objectivism comes in several forms, all holding that reality is objective and independent of the mind. The emphasis is on reality based on the observation of objects and events rather than feelings or thoughts that grow out of literature or art.

55. “There __ darkness but ignorance”: “Twelfth Night” IS NO
William Shakespeare wrote his comedy “Twelfth Night” as a Christmas entertainment (Twelfth Night being the end of the Christmas season).

58. Cheat ROOK
“To rook” is to cheat. The earlier use of “rook” as a noun was as a disparaging term for a swindler or cheat. Somehow, it was insulting to refer to a person as a rook, as in the type of bird.

65. Ancient Roman garment TUNIC
In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a “stola”.

67. Camaro option T-TOP
A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

The Chevrolet Camaro is a car produced by General Motors from 1966 to 2002, and reintroduced in 2009. The Camaro shared much of its design with the Pontiac Firebird, and was introduced as a potential competitor to the Ford Mustang.

75. Quarterback Tony ROMO
Tony Romo is a quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Romo is also an avid amateur golfer and has even tried (albeit unsuccessfully) to qualify for the US Open golf championship.

77. It receives many returns: Abbr. IRS
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

82. Meas. reduced by fog VIS
Visibility (vis.)

88. Picnic side SLAW
The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

91. Van Cleef & __: French jeweler/perfumer ARPELS
Van Cleef & Arpels is a jewellery, watch and perfume company that is based in France. As perhaps one might expect, the company was founded by a Charles Arpels and an Alfred Van Cleef, back in 1906 in Paris.

93. Red Label spirits SMIRNOFF VODKA
The Smirnoff brand of vodka was introduced by Pyotr Smirnov in his Moscow distillery in the late 1800s. Smirnoff was the first vodka to use charcoal filtration in the vodka production process.

96. Crisis team acronym SWAT
SWAT is an acronym standing for Special Weapons and Tactics. The first SWAT team was pulled together in the Los Angeles Police Department in 1968.

97. Letters before F? TGI
“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

100. Mr. Knightley’s wife, in the novel of the same name EMMA
“Emma” is one of my favorite Jane Austen novels, the 1815 tale of Emma Woodhouse and the wonderful George Knightley. Although the heroine becomes much beloved by the end of the story, she comes across as quite nosy and meddlesome for much of the book. Austen actually wrote in her private papers, “I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like.”

102. Clique CIRCLE OF FRIENDS
A “clique” is a small, exclusive group of people. The term comes to us from France, where it has the same meaning. In French it somehow evolved in meaning from the original “clique” meaning a sharp noise, or as we would say today, a “click”.

106. Olympic hawk ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos, Deimos and Eros. The Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

The dove is a symbol of peace, and the hawk is a symbol of war.

107. Teen’s opening number? ONE
The numbers known as the teens start with the digit “1”, i.e. 13, 14, 15 … 19.

108. Actress Ryan IRENE
Irene Ryan was the wonderful American actress who played “Granny” on “The Beverly Hillbillies”. Ryan was remarkable in that she had a successful career in vaudeville, on radio and television, on film and on Broadway.

112. “Full House” actor STAMOS
Actor John Stamos is best known as the star of the sitcom “Full House”, although he also played Dr. Tony Gates on the medical drama “ER”.

116. Rhein tributary AARE
The Aar (also called the “Aare” in German) is the longest river entirely located in Switzerland.

The river running through Europe that we know in English as the Rhine, is called “Rhein” in German, “Rhin” in French and “Rijn” in Dutch.

119. Vivien Leigh’s last film SHIP OF FOOLS
The 1965 movie “Ship of Fools” is a screen adaptation of a novel of the same name by Katherine Anne Porter. It was to be actress Vivien Leigh’s last movie, as she died unexpectedly a couple of years later.

124. Polonius hid behind one ARRAS
A famous arras is seen in Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”. In one pivotal scene, Polonius is hiding behind a tapestry listening to an argument between Hamlet and Gertrude. Hamlet hears Polonius, mistakes his identity and stabs wildly through the cloth, killing Polonius. The name “arras”, used for such a tapestry, comes from the French town of Arras which was famous for the production of fine wall hangings.

125. Razor brand ATRA
Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

128. Reddish horse ROAN
A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

129. General __ chicken TSO’S
General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

Down
5. Black toon duck DAFFY
Daffy Duck first appeared on the screen in “Porky’s Duck Hunt” in 1937. In the original cartoon, Daffy was just meant to have a small role, but he was a big hit as he had so much sass. Even back then, Daffy was voiced by the ubiquitous Mel Blanc.

6. Alamo competitor AVIS
Avis has been around since 1946, and is the second largest car rental agency after Hertz. Avis has the distinction of being the first car rental company to locate a branch at an airport.

The third largest car rental company right now is Alamo, a relative newcomer founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

9. Greeting from Kermit HI-HO
Kermit has to be the most readily recognized puppet character created by the late great Jim Henson. Henson came up with Kermit way back in 1955 when he appeared on a puppet show called “Sam and Friends” that aired in Washington, D.C. Kermit is loved so much that he even has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

10. King in “The Tempest” ALONSO
In William Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest”, Alonso is the King of Naples. Alonso helps Antonio to depose his brother Prospero as Duke of Milan and set him adrift in a boat with Prospero’s young daughter Miranda.

13. Warner __ BROS
The Warner Bros. film studio was founded by four Warner brothers, although their original family name was Wonskolaser. The brothers fled the Nazis from Poland and came to the US via Canada.

16. Fr. holy woman STE
“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a female.

19. Exclusion OSTRACISM
The practice of ostracism, freezing out or exclusion, dates back to Ancient Greece. Back then citizens could write the names of men they thought were exceptionally dangerous on tiles that were publicly posted, resulting in a banishment of ten years. “Ostracize” derives from the Greek “ostrakon”, the word for a “tile”.

24. Shipping overnight, perhaps FEDEXING
FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it’s more catchy abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its “SuperHub” at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world’s largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

30. Certain undercover cop NARC
“Narc” is a slang term for a law enforcement officer who tracks down criminals associated with illegal drugs. “Narc” is short for “narcotics officer”.

32. Andy’s son OPIE
Opie Taylor is the character played by Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”. Opie lives with widowed father Andy Taylor (played by Andy Griffith) and his great-aunt Beatrice “Aunt Bee” Taylor (played by Frances Bavier). Ron Howard first played the role in 1960 in the pilot show, when he was just 5 years old. Howard sure has come a long way since playing Opie Taylor. He has directed some fabulous movies including favorites of mine like “Apollo 13”, “A Beautiful Mind” and “The Da Vinci Code”.

33. Painter Rousseau HENRI
Henri Rousseau was a French Post-Impressionist painter. He was self-taught, only starting to paint seriously in his forties. He worked as a tax collector until he was 49 years old, when he retired to focus on his art. Rousseau’s most famous painting is “The Sleeping Gypsy”, a celebrated work that depicts a lion standing beside a sleeping woman in the moonlight. You can take a look at it in New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

35. 32-team gp. NFL
The National Football League (NFL) was founded in 1920 as the American Professional Association, with the current name being adopted into 1923. The NFL merged with the American Football League (AFL) in 1970.

37. “The Lord of the whole wood,” per Mr. Beaver ASLAN
In the C. S. Lewis series of books “The Chronicles of Narnia”, Aslan is the name of the lion character (as in “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”). “Aslan” is actually the Turkish word for lion. Anyone who has read the books will recognize the the remarkable similarity between the story of Aslan and the story of Christ, including a sacrifice and resurrection.

39. Blood typing concern RH FACTOR
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a “universal donor”.

40. Worker with hides TANNER
Leather is made from animal skins. When the flesh, fat and hair is removed from the skin and it is dried, the resulting product is called “rawhide”. An additional treatment of the skin with chemicals that permanently alter the protein structure of the skin is called “tanning”, and the resulting product is “leather”.

41. Ball girl DEB
Deb is short for “debutante”, which translates from French as “female beginner”.

50. Titular character with no lines GODOT
An Irishman I may be, but I have sat through so many Samuel Beckett plays (the Irish dramatist) and I have yet to come away feeling satisfied that I spent my time well. Of course I am in the minority, as Beckett’s play “Waiting for Godot” was once voted the most significant English language play of the 20th century. Maybe I will give “Waiting for Godot” another chance one day, but I doubt it …

52. “My eye!” in Minsk NYET
“Nyet” is Russian for “no”, and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

56. “__ Aunt”: Little Rascals short ALFALFA’S
Alfalfa was one Hollywood’s “Little Rascals”, also known as “Our Gang”. Alfalfa’s real name was Carl Switzer. He and his brother were quite the young performers around his hometown in Illinois, singing and playing instruments. On a trip to California, the Switzer family were touring the Hal Roach movie studio and were fooling around in the studio cafeteria, basically giving an impromptu performance. Hal Roach happened to be there at the time, and signed both brothers up for roles in “Our Gang”. Carl was to play “Alfalfa”, and brother Harold played “Slim” (aka “Deadpan”).

59. Cassis aperitif KIR
Kir is a French cocktail, made by adding a teaspoon or so of creme de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife (expensive tastes!) is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

66. Monastery garb COWL
A cowl is a long garment with a hood that is primarily worn by monks in the the Christian tradition.

68. Easy read PRIMER
A “primer” is a textbook used to teach the alphabet and basic reading. When “primer” is used in this sense in the US, it is pronounced with a short i (“primmer”). I’ve never understood why such a pronunciation would be used …

82. Explorer __ da Gama VASCO
Vasco da Gama left on his first voyage of discovery in 1497. da Gama journeyed around the Cape of Good Hope, the southernmost tip of Africa, and across the Indian Ocean making landfall in India. Landing in India, his fleet became the first expedition to sail directly from Europe to the sub-continent. Vasco da Gama was well known for acts of cruelty, especially on local inhabitants. One of his milder atrocities was inflicted on a priest whom he labelled as a spy. He had the priest’s lips and ears cut off, and sent him on his way after having a pair of dog’s ears sewn onto his head.

83. “The Young Lions” novelist IRWIN SHAW
Irwin Shaw was an author from New York City. Shaw’s most famous works were his novels “The Young Lions” (1948) and “Rich Man, Poor Man” (1970). The former was made into a successful 1958 film of the same starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Dean Martin. The latter became a successful TV miniseries of the same name starring Peter Strauss and Nick Nolte.

84. External Jeep attachment SPARE TIRE
The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.

87. Napoleon’s légion ARMEE
In French, a military unit might be a “légion” (legion) or an “armée” (army).

89. Mountain State: Abbr. WVA
West Virginia is known as the Mountain State, a reference to the Appalachian Mountains.

The Appalachian Mountains in eastern North America were once as tall as the Alps and the Rockies, before submitting to eons of erosion.

95. Our Gang assent OTAY
Hal Roach made a whole series of comedy shorts with “The Little Rascals”, also known as “Our Gang”. This very likable bunch of kids included Spanky and his kid brother, Porky. Porky had a speech impediment so he couldn’t pronounce “Okay, Spanky” very clearly and it came out as “Otay, Panky”.

99. Dogpatch conditional IF’N
The cartoonist Al Capp set his classic comic strip “Li’l Abner” in the fictional community of “Dogpatch”. According to one of the “Li’l Abner” strips, Dogpatch was located somewhere in the state of Kentucky.

103. Rides to the prom LIMOS
The word “limousine” actually derives from the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a “limousine”. Well, that’s how the story goes anyway …

A prom is a formal dance held upon graduation from high school (we call them “formals” over in Ireland). The term “prom” is short for “promenade”, the name given to a type of dance or ball.

104. Sinatra trademark FEDORA
A fedora is a lovely hat, I think. It is made of felt, and is similar to a trilby, but has a broader brim. “Fedora” was a play written for Sarah Bernhardt and first performed in 1889. Bernhardt had the title role of Princess Fedora, and on stage she wore a hat similar to a modern-day fedora. The play led to the women’s fashion accessory, the fedora hat, commonly worn by women into the beginning of the twentieth century. Men then started wearing fedoras, but only when women gave up the fashion …

110. Black-and-white swimmers ORCAS
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

115. “The Good Earth” wife O-LAN
Pearl S. Buck’s novel “The Good Earth” won a Pulitzer in 1932, and helped Buck win the Nobel Prize for literature a few years later. The novel tells of life in a Chinese village and follows the fortunes of Wang Lung and his wife O-Lan. Although “The Good Earth” has been around for decades, it hit the bestseller list again in 2004 when it was a pick for Oprah’s Book Club.

117. Hendrix hairdo AFRO
Many of his contemporaries regarded Jimi Hendrix as the greatest electric guitarist in the history of rock music. Hendrix was from Seattle and didn’t really have a really stellar start to his working life. He failed to finish high school and fell foul of the law by getting caught in stolen cars, twice. The courts gave him the option of the army or two years in prison. Hendrix chose the former and soon found himself in the famous 101st Airborne. In the army, his less-than-disciplined ways helped him (as he would have seen it) because his superiors successfully petitioned to get him discharged after serving only one year of his two-year requirement, just to get him out of their hair.

119. Wee SMA’
The Scots dialect word sma’ means “small”.

120. Granada gold ORO
Granada is a city and province in Andalusia in the south of Spain. Granada should not to be confused with Grenada (note the different spelling), the island nation in the Caribbean that was invaded by the US in 1983.

122. Food service trade org. NRA
National Restaurant Association (NRA)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Time to hang on? … A SEC
5. Dinner __ DATE
9. Trunk hardware HASP
13. Future flowers BUDS
17. Sheltered area COVE
18. Declare frankly AVOW
19. NFL Titan, before 1999 OILER
20. “But I could be wrong” OR NOT
21. Place of business THE OFFICE
23. Powerful display SHOW OF FORCE
25. 49-Down counterpart: Abbr. SOR
26. “Assuming that’s true … ” IF SO …
27. Heap TON
28. Sics on LETS AT
29. Like some guitar music TWANGY
31. Comic Jay MOHR
34. Not nice at all SNIDE
36. U.S. govt. broadcaster VOA
38. Mandlikova of ’80s tennis HANA
39. Recidivists REPEAT OFFENDERS
42. Louise __, National Book Award winner for “The Round House” ERDRICH
45. Empire with provinces called suyu INCA
46. Superman nemesis Luthor LEX
47. Hebrew for “skyward” EL AL
48. Olive branch PEACE OFFERING
51. Still being tested, as software IN BETA
53. Objectivism advocate Rand AYN
54. Stadium shaker ROAR
55. “There __ darkness but ignorance”: “Twelfth Night” IS NO
56. Undefined number ANY
57. Thieves’ room? DEN
58. Cheat ROOK
60. Wound covering SCAB
62. __ center MED
63. Sweater sizes: Abbr. LGES
65. Ancient Roman garment TUNIC
67. Camaro option T-TOP
69. Where shakes may be seen ROOF
71. Udder parts TEATS
75. Quarterback Tony ROMO
77. It receives many returns: Abbr. IRS
79. Become less hostile THAW
81. Frigate front PROW
82. Meas. reduced by fog VIS
85. Major conflict WAR
86. Country singer McCann LILA
88. Picnic side SLAW
90. Place for a nail TOE
91. Van Cleef & __: French jeweler/perfumer ARPELS
93. Red Label spirits SMIRNOFF VODKA
96. Crisis team acronym SWAT
97. Letters before F? TGI
100. Mr. Knightley’s wife, in the novel of the same name EMMA
101. Leaning AT A TILT
102. Clique CIRCLE OF FRIENDS
106. Olympic hawk ARES
107. Teen’s opening number? ONE
108. Actress Ryan IRENE
109. Close NEAR
110. Common rejoinder in one-upmanship OH YEAH!
112. “Full House” actor STAMOS
114. Forest female DOE
116. Rhein tributary AARE
118. MLX ÷ X CVI
119. Vivien Leigh’s last film SHIP OF FOOLS
121. Misaligned … or, literally, a perfectly aligned aspect of seven answers in this puzzle OFF CENTER
123. Farm girls MARES
124. Polonius hid behind one ARRAS
125. Razor brand ATRA
126. Source ROOT
127. Blown away AWED
128. Reddish horse ROAN
129. General __ chicken TSO’S
130. Shelter sounds ARFS

Down
1. Does as expected ACTS THE PART
2. “But enough about me” follower SO, HOW ARE YOU?
3. Occasionally EVER AND ANON
4. Board VIP CEO
5. Black toon duck DAFFY
6. Alamo competitor AVIS
7. In the future TO COME
8. Farm girl EWE
9. Greeting from Kermit HI-HO
10. King in “The Tempest” ALONSO
11. Put in stitches SEW
12. Hot-button political platform term PRO-LIFE
13. Warner __ BROS
14. Came apart UNRAVELED
15. High degree DOCTORATE
16. Fr. holy woman STE
19. Exclusion OSTRACISM
20. Quite a bit OFTEN
22. Fruit often dried FIG
24. Shipping overnight, perhaps FEDEXING
30. Certain undercover cop NARC
32. Andy’s son OPIE
33. Painter Rousseau HENRI
35. 32-team gp. NFL
37. “The Lord of the whole wood,” per Mr. Beaver ASLAN
39. Blood typing concern RH FACTOR
40. Worker with hides TANNER
41. Ball girl DEB
43. Suffix with front -IER
44. Sweet talk COOS
49. Rites group FRAT
50. Titular character with no lines GODOT
52. “My eye!” in Minsk NYET
56. “__ Aunt”: Little Rascals short ALFALFA’S
59. Cassis aperitif KIR
61. Starts to bubble, maybe BOILS
64. NFL season opening mo. SEP
66. Monastery garb COWL
68. Easy read PRIMER
70. Extremely OH SO
72. Production design team member ART DIRECTOR
73. Said farewell to TOOK LEAVE OF
74. Resort area souvenirs SWEATSHIRTS
76. With “a,” eminently skilled at, as disguise … MASTER OF
78. Severe disrepute SLIMINESS
80. Be carried gently WAFT
82. Explorer __ da Gama VASCO
83. “The Young Lions” novelist IRWIN SHAW
84. External Jeep attachment SPARE TIRE
87. Napoleon’s légion ARMEE
89. Mountain State: Abbr. WVA
92. List-limiting letters ETC
94. Gram NANA
95. Our Gang assent OTAY
98. Makes it big GOES FAR
99. Dogpatch conditional IF’N
103. Rides to the prom LIMOS
104. Sinatra trademark FEDORA
105. They may be rough DRAFTS
110. Black-and-white swimmers ORCAS
111. Bit of a chuckle -HEE
113. Mimicked APED
115. “The Good Earth” wife O-LAN
117. Hendrix hairdo AFRO
119. Wee SMA’
120. Granada gold ORO
121. Meal opener OAT
122. Food service trade org. NRA

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9 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 16, Sunday”

  1. I LOVE this site! My home town paper often fails to print answers to the puzzle and I found it so frustrating. Now I can check my answers and get explanations as well which makes my Sunday AM puzzle all the more entertaining.

  2. Almost finished Friday, almost finished Saturday and almost finished this one. Came close…again. Got tangled up there in the EMMA, LILA, NANA, ARRAS, SLIMINIESS nexus. SMA for Wee, NANA for Gram, and IFN were all a little painful as well.

    Wow – all you had to do was post a tile with a name on it, and you could get rid of someone for 10 years? I'd have had a room full of tiles ready to go. Then again I'd have been ostracized as well surely.

    Agree with Bill on the "From the Earth to the Moon" series. It was outstanding. I look for it once in a while (EVER AND ANON??) to see if HBO is rerunning it or if it ever appears on Netflix or something, but I never see it shown anywhere.

    Best –

  3. In the Our Gang shorts of the 30's, in my recollection (from reruns on TV) it was Buckwheat who continually used the phrase "Otay". Eddie Murphy used to parody that on episodes of SNL. Also, Buckwheat's biography is titled "Otay, the Life of William "Buckwheat" Thomas". Porky once said the phrase in unison with Buckwheat in a short film and seems to have been given some credit for the phrase.

  4. Nyet happens to be the only Russian word I know, and I could not, and still can't, see what it has to do w/ "My eye!".

  5. @Anonymous
    Nyet happens to be the only Russian word I know, and I could not, and still can't, see what it has to do w/ "My eye!".

    "My eye!" near as I can tell is a very old British expression that means disbelief or an emphatic no. In fact, it's so old that no one can seem to agree on the expression of the original form or it's origin. I use the expression "old fogey" on here at times, but this one is "old fogey" to our grandpas.

    Truth be told though, I'm like you: I put the only common Russian word I knew there and it fit. The whole thing is junk fill, just like a lot of these grids are.

  6. I am in a time warp ! I am in Abu Dhabi, UAE – United Arab Emirates, and it is in the middle of a Monday morning, 8.00 am, Feb 1st, and I just finished the easy Monday puzzle. And here, I am stuck in the Sunday bog, er, blog.

    Time and tide waits for no man, and when you post from around the world, you realize that people may sleep but the world keeps spinning, and a day and a night is merely a blip in the eons of time.

    See you in a couple of hours, at tomorrow, or er, today.
    Have a nice day, all.

  7. Hi Vidwan! Is it Tuesday yet? 😀
    I just dropped in to say hello and gripe about this and so many Sunday puzzles. Too difficult, and too boring!
    So, because it's Sunday, we have a LONGER version of a difficult boring grid. I don't understand… Sundays are supposed to be cleverly themed and a TAD easier than Fridays and Saturdays.
    Is this a tradition that died when we lost Mr. Reagle?
    I guess I should just stop doing these.
    I am sorry for complaining… I hope you folks understand…
    And I'm glad tomorrow's Monday!
    Be well~~™

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