LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Jul 16, Wednesday




LA Times Crossword Solution 13 Jul 16







Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Say Cheese

Each of today’s themed answers starts with a hidden word, and that word is a type of CHEESE:

  • 62A…Photographer’s request, and a hint to what’s hidden at the starts of 17-, 26- and 47-Across..SAY CHEESE
  • 17A…Paperwork carrier..BRIEFCASE (hiding “brie”)
  • 26A…Detector of a tiny heartbeat..FETAL MONITOR (hiding “feta”)
  • 47A…Asian bean dish..EDAMAME SALAD (hiding “edam”)

Bill’s time: 6m 26s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1…Targets of some bark beetles..ELMS

Dutch elm disease is a fungus devastating to all species of elm trees that is transmitted by the elm bark beetle. The disease is thought to have originated in Asia and is now rampant in Europe and North America. Even though there is a hybrid of elm known as the Dutch elm, the disease isn’t named after the tree. Rather, the disease is called “Dutch” as it was identified in 1921 by a phytopathologist (plant pathologist) in the Netherlands.

9…”The Blacklist” network..NBC TV

“The Blacklist” is an entertaining, albeit a little formulaic, crime drama TV show starring James Spader and Megan Boone. Spader plays a successful criminal who surrenders to the FBI in order to help catch a “blacklist” of high-profile criminals.

14…Sunbeam floater..MOTE

“Mote” is another word for a speck of dust.

16…Cliff dwelling..AERIE

An aerie is the nest of an eagle, and is also known as an “eyrie”.

17…Paperwork carrier..BRIEFCASE (hiding “brie”)

Brie is a soft cheese, named after the French region where it originated. Brie is similar to the equally famous (and delicious) camembert.

20…”Bewitched” witch..ENDORA

In the television sitcom “Bewitched”, Endora was Samantha’s mother, with both mother, daughter and indeed granddaughter having the magical powers accorded to witches. Endora was played flamboyantly by Agnes Moorehead.

21…Offers unsolicited advice..KIBITZES

To kibitz (or less commonly “kibbitz”) is to look on and offer unwanted advice. The term comes into English from German via Yiddish. “Kibitz” developed in German from the name of the bird “Kiebitz” which had the reputation as a meddler.

26…Detector of a tiny heartbeat..FETAL MONITOR (hiding “feta”)

Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep’s milk, or a mixture of sheep’s and goat’s milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.

34…Move among moguls..SKI

Moguls are the series of bumps in the surface of snow that arise naturally as a succession of skiers make turns on a slope.

39…Conniving..SLY

“To connive” is to conspire with, to cooperate in secret. The term comes from the Latin verb “connivere” meaning “to wink”, the idea being that conniver’s might give each other a sly wink.

41…Exams for future D.A.’s..LSATS

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

42…Obstacle on the links..HAZARD

The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. “Hlinc” was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

44…Crumpet accompaniment..TEA

I do love a nice crumpet. Crumpets are made from flour and yeast, with baking soda added to make the characteristic holes in the surface. Served hot, with butter melted into the holes, nothing better …

46…Levels, briefly..KOS

Knocks out (KOs)

47…Asian bean dish..EDAMAME SALAD (hiding “edam”)

Edamame is a simple dish made of immature soybeans still in the pod. The pods are boiled and then salted before serving, usually as a snack or side dish. The name “edamame” translates as “twig bean”.

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

61…Heavenly explosions..NOVAE

A nova is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

62…Photographer’s request, and a hint to what’s hidden at the starts of 17-, 26- and 47-Across..SAY CHEESE

Photographers often instruct us to say “cheese”, to elicit a smile-like expression. Even Japanese photographers use the word “cheese” for the same effect. Bulgarians use the word “zele” meaning “cabbage”. The Chinese say “eggplant”, the Danish “orange”, the Iranians “apple” and the most Latin Americans say “whiskey”.

65…Lamb pen name..ELIA

Charles Lamb published a famous collection of essays simply entitled “Essays of Elia”. Elia was actually a clerk and co-worker of Charles Lamb, whereas Lamb was the author.

66…Risotto base..RICE

Risotto is an Italian rice dish that is usually served as a first course in Italy, but as a main course here in North America.

69…Symbol on Texas’ flag..STAR

The single star on the state flag of Texas is a reminder of the “lone star” on the 1836 National Standard of Texas. The single gold star on a blue background symbolized Texas as an independent republic and its struggle for independence from Mexico.

Down

2…”Bonanza” co-star of Michael, Dan and Pernell..LORNE

Lorne Greene was a Canadian actor, best known for playing the patriarch Ben Cartwright on the TV show “Bonanza”. Greene also had a number-one hit with the spoken-word ballad “Ringo” released in 1964.

Actor Michael Landon’s big break came with his TV role as Little Joe Cartwright in the long-running Western show “Bonanza”. He continued his television success with leading roles in “Little House on the Prairie” and “Highway to Heaven”. One of Landon’s claims to fame is that in 1954 he threw a javelin over 193 feet, the longest javelin throw by a high schooler that year.

Dan Blocker was the actor who played Hoss Cartwright in the famous TV show “Bonanza”. Hoss was the “slow” character on the show. Paradoxically, Dan Blocker was the most educated member of the cast, having earned a master’s degree in the dramatic arts. Blocker passed away while “Bonanza” was still running. He was undergoing relatively routine gallbladder surgery and developed a pulmonary embolism which killed him. Bonanza ran for just one more season after Blocker passed away.

The actor Pernell Roberts was best known for his TV roles. Roberts played the eldest son Adam Cartwright on “Bonanza”, and the title character on “Trapper John, M.D.”

The western TV series “Bonanza” ran for 14 seasons, making it the second longest-running western show on television (after “Gunsmoke”, which ran for 20 seasons). “Bonanza” is set in the area around Virginia City in Nevada, close to Lake Tahoe.

3…Crete’s highest elev…MT IDA

There are two peaks called Mount Ida that are sacred according to Greek mythology. Mount Ida in Crete is the island’s highest point, and is where one can find the cave in which Zeus was reared. Mount Ida in Asia Minor (located in modern-day Turkey) is where Ganymede was swept up by Zeus in the form of an eagle that took him to Olympus where he served as cupbearer to the gods.

4…Accompany to the depot, say..SEE OFF

Our term “depot”, meaning a station or warehouse, derives from the word “dépôt”, French for “deposit” or “place of deposit”.

6…Gp. with many specialists..AMA

American Medical Association (AMA)

8…AARP concern..AGEISM

AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

9…Washington ballplayer..NATIONAL

The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

10…Unconventional ’50s-’60s types..BEATNIKS

The term “beatnik” was coined by journalist Herb Caen in 1958 when he used it to describe the stereotypical young person of the “beat generation” that was oft associated with the writer Jack Kerouac. That stereotypical beatnik would be playing the bongos and rolling his or her own cigarettes. Male beatniks also tended to sport goatees and wear berets.

11…Cross, in Costa Rica..CRUZ

Costa Rica is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua in the north, and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

13…Cat scanners?..VETS

“Vet” is an abbreviation for “veterinarian”, a professional who treat animals for disease and injury. The word “veterinary” comes from the Latin “veterinae” meaning “working animals, beasts of burden”.

24…__ OFF 5TH: discount store..SAKS

Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdales and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide. There are even more Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH discount stores.

29…”Beetle Bailey” dog..OTTO

Sgt. Snorkel (“Sarge”) is Beetle Bailey’s nemesis in the cartoon strip that bears his name. Snorkel has a dog called Otto that he dresses up to look just like himself. Otto started off as a regular dog, but artist Mort Walker decide to draw him more like his owner, and soon Otto became a big hit.

30…Diana of “The Wiz”..ROSS

Diana Ross is one of the most prolific recording artists in history. She sang with the Supremes from 1959 to 1970 and then launched an incredibly successful solo career. Ross was listed in the 1993 edition of “The Guinness Book of World Records” as the most successful music artist ever, with eighteen #1 records.

“The Wiz”, the 1975 musical, was written by Charlie Smalls and is an African-American adaptation of Baum’s “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. The film version of the stage show was released in 1978, starring Diana Ross as Dorothy and Michael Jackson as the Scarecrow. I haven’t seen it, though. “The Wizard of Oz” scares me, as the flying monkeys creep me out. There, I’ve admitted it in public …

32…”The Impaler” of Romanian history..VLAD

Vlad III was a 15th century ruler in modern-day Romania. He was given the name “Vlad the Impaler” after he died, and this suggests that he was in the habit of impaling his enemies. His father, Vlad II, was known as Vlad Dracul, which translates as Vlad the Devil or Dragon. As a result, Vlad the Impaler was also known by the diminutive form of his father’s name, i.e. Dracula! Bram Stoker borrowed this name for his famous 1897 novel titled “Dracula”.

33…Sphinx city..GIZA

The Great Sphinx of Giza is a huge limestone statue of a mythical creature with the body of a lion and the head of a human. It is the largest monolithic statue in the world. Famously, the Great Sphinx is missing its nose and beard.

37…Voice heard in “California Dreamin'”..MAMA CASS

Cass Elliot was one of the four singers in the Mamas and the Papas, a sensational group from the sixties. “Mama Cass” was performing sold-out concerts in London in 1974 when she was found dead one morning, having had a heart attack. She was only 32 years old. Eerily, Elliot died in the same flat (on loan from Harry Nilsson) in which the Who’s drummer Keith Moon would die just four years later.

“California Dreamin'” was first recorded by singer Barry McGuire, with backing vocals sung by a folk group called the New Journeymen. The New Journeymen evolved into the Mamas and the Papas, who then recorded their own hit version of “California Dreamin'” in 1965, using the original vocal backing track.

38…March Madness concerns..BRACKETS

“Bracketology” is a term used to describe the process of predicting which college basketball teams will advance in a bracket in the annual NCAA Basketball Tournament. President Barack Obama famously participates in an ESPN segment called “Baracketology” in which he predicts the outcome of the tournament, game by game.

45…Sources of fine wool..ALPACAS

Alpacas are like small llamas, but unlike llamas were never beasts of burden. Alpacas were bred specifically for the fleece. As such, there are no known wild alpacas these days, even in their native Peru.

53…Start of a fitness motto..USE IT

Use it or lose it.

54…Puccini opera..TOSCA

Unlike so many operas, “Tosca” was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. “Tosca” is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America, although I’ve only seen it once myself …

55…”And wrinkled lip, and __ of cold command”: “Ozymandias”..SNEER

“Ozymandias” is a sonnet written by Percy Bysshe Shelley that was first published in 1818:

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

58…Saucony competitor..AVIA

The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

Saucony is a sportswear manufacturer, mainly making athletic shoes. The company was founded in 1898 on the banks of Saucony Creek in Pennsylvania, hence the name.

59…Corduroy feature..WALE

Wales are parallel ribs in a fabric, such as corduroy.

63…Peke’s squeak..YIP

The pekingese breed originated in China, as one might suspect from the name. Breeding practices have resulted in the the dog having many health problems, including breathing issues related to the “desirable” flat face. Standards have been changed in recent years, demanding an “evident muzzle” in an attempt to breed healthier dogs.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Targets of some bark beetles..ELMS

5…Spreadsheet info..DATA

9…”The Blacklist” network..NBC TV

14…Sunbeam floater..MOTE

15…High-tech read..E-MAG

16…Cliff dwelling..AERIE

17…Paperwork carrier..BRIEFCASE (hiding “brie”)

19…Razz..TAUNT

20…”Bewitched” witch..ENDORA

21…Offers unsolicited advice..KIBITZES

23…Overwhelms with sound..DEAFENS

25…”I’m getting to it”..SOON

26…Detector of a tiny heartbeat..FETAL MONITOR (hiding “feta”)

31…Batting no…AVG

34…Move among moguls..SKI

35…Develop a liking for..TAKE TO

36…Ascend..CLIMB

39…Conniving..SLY

41…Exams for future D.A.’s..LSATS

42…Obstacle on the links..HAZARD

44…Crumpet accompaniment..TEA

46…Levels, briefly..KOS

47…Asian bean dish..EDAMAME SALAD (hiding “edam”)

51…Rent-__..A-CAR

52…Starts to grow..SPROUTS

56…Facial indication of amazement..SLACK JAW

60…Takes, as advice..ACTS ON

61…Heavenly explosions..NOVAE

62…Photographer’s request, and a hint to what’s hidden at the starts of 17-, 26- and 47-Across..SAY CHEESE

64…Most desirable invitees..A-LIST

65…Lamb pen name..ELIA

66…Risotto base..RICE

67…Stained __..GLASS

68…Workout count..REPS

69…Symbol on Texas’ flag..STAR

Down

1…Journalist in a battle zone..EMBED

2…”Bonanza” co-star of Michael, Dan and Pernell..LORNE

3…Crete’s highest elev…MT IDA

4…Accompany to the depot, say..SEE OFF

5…Pours into a carafe..DECANTS

6…Gp. with many specialists..AMA

7…Chore..TASK

8…AARP concern..AGEISM

9…Washington ballplayer..NATIONAL

10…Unconventional ’50s-’60s types..BEATNIKS

11…Cross, in Costa Rica..CRUZ

12…Point on a rake..TINE

13…Cat scanners?..VETS

18…Gratis..FREE

22…Heave-ho..BOOT

24…__ OFF 5TH: discount store..SAKS

27…Jaunty tunes..LILTS

28…Tropical hardwood..TEAK

29…”Beetle Bailey” dog..OTTO

30…Diana of “The Wiz”..ROSS

31…Long (for)..ACHE

32…”The Impaler” of Romanian history..VLAD

33…Sphinx city..GIZA

37…Voice heard in “California Dreamin'”..MAMA CASS

38…March Madness concerns..BRACKETS

40…Supporters’ votes..YEAS

43…Key with two sharps: Abbr…D MAJ

45…Sources of fine wool..ALPACAS

48…Traditional golf pencil’s lack..ERASER

49…Footwear insert..ARCH

50…Nanas, often..DOTERS

53…Start of a fitness motto..USE IT

54…Puccini opera..TOSCA

55…”And wrinkled lip, and __ of cold command”: “Ozymandias”..SNEER

56…Unforeseen obstacle..SNAG

57…Lounge around..LOLL

58…Saucony competitor..AVIA

59…Corduroy feature..WALE

63…Peke’s squeak..YIP




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11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Jul 16, Wednesday”

  1. Very fast solve – a record time for a Wednesday for me I believe.

    Not coincidentally a made a few rather amusing errors. Here goes: I had “enbed” for 1D which led to “note” for Sunbeam floater. I just figured it was something I didn’t know. I also had “wave” for 59D as corduroy is wavy, right? ELIA or Evia..what do I know? Most amusingly I had “fetus monitor” which led to “suks” OFF 5th (I thought it was a parody of some sort) and “silts” – I never know music anyway.

    So quick, easy….and wrong today. Also the theme completely eluded me. I get the SAY CHEESE part, but I was looking for jumbled anagrams of something. So I turned an easy puzzle into a mess. What is it Bill always says – “more care, less haste”?

    @Carrie
    You are correct about their being synonyms. It just means I have to add a footnote to what I thought was my great heuristic about how crosswords should work…

    And welcome back, Vidwan. For some reason I thought you were somewhere in the mountains in India. I had the mountains part correct at least.

    Best –

  2. No strike overs and not many sticking points. A little hesitation for “kibitzes” and some mulling over to come up with “slack jaw”. Now on to the WSJ daily grid.

    Hope you all have a great Hump Day.

  3. Like Jeff, I got the theme answer but didn’t connect it to the rest of the grid. Generally a good grid today, not much generic crossfill.

    I believe this grid was attributed to Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venke, at least in the online version.

  4. Jeff, I’m getting too old to go back in India. 😉 Colorado was hot, dry and demanding enough. I felt rather sorry for a beautiful state, which has no heavy industry or technology and has to depend so much on tourism. I saw some cattle, some elk, some sheep, mountain goats and rabbits by the gross but my host family is strictly vegetarian, so I kept my lips pursed. The Rocky Mountain Park is apparently the highest point federal park in the US and quite spectacular views and quite scary for the deep chasms and abysses (sp.?).

    The puzzle was challenging and I had a few missteps but managed to complete it, and in the process enjoyed it very much. The theme completely eluded me, but thanks to Bill, I am now in the know.

    I’m glad the Dutch Elm disease is a compliment to an investigative Dutch biologist or botanist, unlike the French &/or Spanish disease, which is merely a ethnophobic or xenophobic pejorative.

    Bill, thank you for your blog. and all the information you sprinkle so generously. I just studied the biography of Wm. Tecumseh Sherman. Very interesting.

    Have a nice day, all.

  5. 9:57, no errors, iPad.

    One of the entries in today’s King crossword was … the PEABODY award, which I’d never heard of until recently and is suddenly popping up everywhere I look. It’s a plot, I tell you … 🙂

    @Bill … Thanks for posting the Shelley poem. A lovely one to be reminded of …

  6. @Vidwan … I live in Colorado and Rocky Mountain National Park is one of favorite hang-outs. In fact, if you were up there last Wednesday or last Sunday, we might have crossed paths. A truly wonderful place …

  7. OK I’m trying to link Golliwog’s Cakewalk by Debussy.
    Chenyin Li has a good version on youtube.
    Otherwise there was a blog that noted the history of the dance
    (Cakewalk) and there was a pattern to knit one of the dolls.
    Vidwan, I tried!!!

  8. One of my fastest Wednesdays – Woot! Woot! Yesterday went fast too.
    Had no idea how to spell KIBITZES, but I worked it out. Laughed at SLACK JAW. Hasn’t been too many time in my life I’ve been at that point.

    Vidwan, did you do the drive across the park to Grand Lake? White knuckle all the way! Beautiful, but too terrifying to really appreciate the scenery. We were there last summer. My husband said he would never again drive that road! Winding, narrow, and a straight drop to the bottom coming and going!

  9. Hi folks!
    Here’s why I just love our lil corner: a Shelley poem and a vivid description of a mountain road. AND! @Tony, loving your avatar!
    This puzzle was tough for me!! I should have managed it without cheating, but I did peek at a coupla things. Had PINE instead of ACHE, and couldn’t work it out.
    Wonder how Glenn’s doing…! Hope he’s back soon.
    Sweet dreams~~™????(Colorado wildlife!)

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