LA Times Crossword Answers 23 Jul 16, Saturday




LA Times Crossword Solution 23 Jul 16







Constructed by: Ed Sessa

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 16m 21s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

10…Title from the Aramaic for “father”..ABBOT

Our word “abbot” ultimately derives from the Aramaic word “abba”, an honorific title extended to one’s father.

15…Subject of the 2015 Erik Larson nonfiction bestseller “Dead Wake”..LUSITANIA

The RMS Lusitania was a Cunard ocean liner that was sunk off the coast of Ireland in May 1915 during WWI. The Lusitania was on it’s traditional route between Liverpool and New York City, having departed New York six days before the sinking. She was attacked by a German U-boat, with 1,198 of the 1,959 people on board being killed. The main result of the sinking was to turn public opinion against Germany, greatly contributing to the US entering the war.

19…Saruman soldier in “The Lord of the Rings”..ORC

Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

25…Flat-bottomed boats..DORIES

A dory is a small boat, around 20 feet long with a shallow draft, a flat bottom and a sharp bow. Dories are commonly used for fishing.

28…19th-century dancer Lola..MONTEZ

Despite the stage name, Lola Montez was an Irish dancer and actress. Montez was born Eliza Gilbert in Sligo, in the west of the country. She grew up in India, where her father was posted by the British Army. After eloping with soldier at 16 years of age, she separated from him after five years of marriage and became a professional dance. She first used the Montez name and adopted the persona a Spanish dancer in London in 1843. Soon after, she earned the reputation of a courtesan, and eventually became the mistress of Ludwig I of Bavaria, who gave her the title Countess of Landsfeld, along with a large annuity. She traveled the world as a dancer, eventually dying at the age of 39 in New York City from syphilis.

33…Poolroom powder..TALC

Some pool players use talcum powder on their hands and on the cue itself, so that the cue moves smoothly when taking a shot.

34…Capital of South Africa..RANDS

The Rand is the currency of South Africa. Much of South Africa’s famed gold comes from mines around Johannesburg in the Witwatersrand (Afrikaans for “the ridge of white waters”). The Rand currency takes its name from this ridge.

35…Fizz flavoring..SLOE

By definition, a cocktail known as a Fizz includes lemon or lime juice and carbonated water. The most popular of the genre is the Gin Fizz, made from 3 parts gin, 2 parts lemon juice, 1 part sugar syrup and 5 parts soda water. There is also a variant known as a sloe gin fizz.

41…Four-time Depp role..SPARROW

Captain Jack Sparrow is the protagonist in the “Pirates of the Caribbean” series of movies. Sparrow is of course played by Johnny Depp. Depp has said that he based his portrayal of Sparrow partly on the Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards. I could believe that …

43…Either 2010 “True Grit” director..COEN

The classic 1969 western movie “True Grit” starring John Wayne is a screen adaptation of a 1968 novel by Henry Hathaway. The Coen brothers made another big screen adaption of the novel in 2010 starring Jeff Bridges in the Rooster Cogburn role previously played by John Wayne.

47…Justice Fortas..ABE

Abe Fortas was a US Supreme Court Justice from 1965 to 1969. Fortas has to resign his position on the bench due to a scandal about payments received, allegedly for favors granted.

51…Riddick portrayer..VIN DIESEL

Vin Diesel is the stage name of actor Mark Sinclair Vincent. He was born in New York City with his twin brother Paul. The twins never knew their father, and their mother is an astrologer. Vincent was given the nickname of “Diesel” by his friends early in his life, as he was said to have a bottomless supply of energy.

“Riddick” is a series of sci-fi movies starring Vin Diesel as an antihero title character. The first film in the series was “Pitch Black”, released in 2000. Never seen one, and probably never will …

54…They often precede garage sales..ESTIMATES

I suppose the reference is to estimates for the costs of repairs by a garage.

55…Some RPI grads..ENGRS

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the “application of science to the common purposes of life”, an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school’s sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

Down

3…Minute part of a minute, for short..PSEC

A picosecond is one trillionth of a second, and is correctly abbreviated to “ps” in the SI system of measurements. I guess that’s what “psec” is meant to be …

4…ID with a photo..LIC

License (lic.)

6…Garb named for an island..CAPRIS

Capri pants first became popular on the island of Capri, apparently. They were invented in Europe in 1948, but only became stylish in the US in the sixties. Mary Tyler Moore often wore Capri pants on “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and to some extent she sparked a fashion trend. After a lull in the seventies and eighties there was a resurgence in sales after Uma Thurman wore them (and danced in them) in “Pulp Fiction”. Can’t stand the look of them myself …

7…Cation’s opposite..ANION

As we all recall from science class, a positive ion is called a cation and a negative ion is an anion. The names “cation” and “anion” come from Greek, with “kation” meaning “going down” and “anion” meaning “going up”.

8…Costa __..RICA

Costa Rica is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua in the north, and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

9…Art form offering plenty of kicks?..TAEKWONDO

Taekwondo is the national sport of Korea. “Tae” means “to strike or break with foot”; “kwon” means “to strike or break with fist”; “do” means “way” or “art”. Along with judo, taekwondo is one of only two martial arts included in the Olympic Games.

11…Informal talk..BULL SESSION

The phrase “bull session” was popularized by American college students in the 1920s. The term refers to a discussion, particularly between male friends. The phrase “to shoot the bull”, meaning to talk freely and pretentiously about something one knows very little, is derivative of “bull session”.

12…Wedding planner’s nightmare..BRIDEZILLA

A bridezilla is a difficult and demanding bride, with the term first used in 1995 in “The Boston Globe”.

13…City near the Great Salt Lake..OGDEN

Ogden, Utah was the first permanent settlement by people of European descent in what is now the state of Utah.

14…Many Beliebers..TEENS

Justin Bieber is a young pop singer from London, Ontario. Bieber was actually discovered on YouTube by talent manager Scooter Brown. Fans of Bieber call themselves “Beliebers”. Personally, I’m no believer in Bieber …

24…Sisyphus’ stone, e.g…ONUS

In the Greek myth, Sisyphus is condemned to roll a boulder up a hill, watch it fall back, then roll it up the hill again for eternity.

25…Morse “H” quartet..DITS

In Morse code, the letter H is represented by 4 dots.

34…First female attorney general..RENO

Janet Reno was Attorney General of the US from 1993 to 2001. Reno was the person to hold the office second longest, and was our first female Attorney General. In 2002, Reno ran for Governor of Florida but failed to win the Democratic nomination. Thereafter she retired from public life.

37…Pub orders..PORTERS

Porter is a dark beer that originated in London in the 1700s and is named for the street and river porters with whom it was very popular. Porter is a well-hopped beer made using brown malt, which gives it the dark color.

40…Best Supporting Actress two years before Cloris..GOLDIE

Goldie Hawn won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in “Cactus Flower” (1969). Cloris Leachman won the same award for her performance in “The Last Picture Show” (1971).

42…Fibonacci or Galileo..PISAN

Leonardo of Pisa was a famous and respected Italian mathematician, also known as simply “Fibonacci”. He is remembered for writing about a number sequence (although he didn’t “discover” it) that later was given the name “Fibonacci sequence”. He wrote about the series of numbers in his book called “Liber Abaci”, a celebrated work that introduced Arabic numerals (i.e. 0-9) to the Western world.

Galileo Galilei may be the most famous son of the city of Pisa in Italy and was considered by many to have been the father of modern science. In the world of physics, Galileo postulated that objects of different masses would fall at the same rate provided they did so in a vacuum (so there was no air resistance). There is a story that he dropped two balls of different masses from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate this, but this probably never happened. Centuries later, Astronaut David Scott performed Galileo’s proposed experiment when he dropped a hammer and feather on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission and we all saw the objects hit the moon surface, at exactly the same time.

43…Poem division..CANTO

A canto is a section of a long poem, and is a term first used by the Italian poet Dante. “Canto” is the Italian for “song”.

46…Mrs. Addams, to Gomez..TISH

Gomez and Morticia (“Tish”) Addams were the parents in “The Addams Family”, a creation of the cartoonist Charles Addams. In the sixties television show, Gomez was played by John Astin and Morticia was played by Carolyn Jones.

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…One not to upset?..APPLE CART

10…Title from the Aramaic for “father”..ABBOT

15…Subject of the 2015 Erik Larson nonfiction bestseller “Dead Wake”..LUSITANIA

16…Hurricane peril..SURGE

17…Perilous situation..PRECIPICE

18…Water park attraction..SLIDE

19…Saruman soldier in “The Lord of the Rings”..ORC

20…Guttural utterance..CROAK

21…Bygone..OLDEN

22…Similar..AKIN

23…Goes downhill..WORSENS

25…Flat-bottomed boats..DORIES

28…19th-century dancer Lola..MONTEZ

29…Still..INERT

30…Takeout order?..MINUS SIGN

33…Poolroom powder..TALC

34…Capital of South Africa..RANDS

35…Fizz flavoring..SLOE

36…Used in an undignified way..STOOPED TO

38…Test on the air..PILOT

39…Hags..CRONES

40…Pained reactions..GROANS

41…Four-time Depp role..SPARROW

43…Either 2010 “True Grit” director..COEN

44…Musical instruction..HIT IT!

45…Even slightly..AT ALL

47…Justice Fortas..ABE

50…Indicator of a private thought..ASIDE

51…Riddick portrayer..VIN DIESEL

53…__ house..MANOR

54…They often precede garage sales..ESTIMATES

55…Some RPI grads..ENGRS

56…Fitting place for sneaks..SHOE STORE

Down

1…Maker of TBONZ treats..ALPO

2…Run well..PURR

3…Minute part of a minute, for short..PSEC

4…ID with a photo..LIC

5…iPhone movie purchase..E-TICKET

6…Garb named for an island..CAPRIS

7…Cation’s opposite..ANION

8…Costa __..RICA

9…Art form offering plenty of kicks?..TAEKWONDO

10…Puts into groups..ASSORTS

11…Informal talk..BULL SESSION

12…Wedding planner’s nightmare..BRIDEZILLA

13…City near the Great Salt Lake..OGDEN

14…Many Beliebers..TEENS

22…Plane lane..AIR CORRIDOR

24…Sisyphus’ stone, e.g…ONUS

25…Morse “H” quartet..DITS

26…Go __ great length..ON AT

27…Changing places..RELOCATING

28…They may be thin..MINTS

30…Stirred things up..MADE WAVES

31…”And?”..GO ON

32…Realizes..NETS

34…First female attorney general..RENO

37…Pub orders..PORTERS

38…Minor matches..PRELIMS

40…Best Supporting Actress two years before Cloris..GOLDIE

41…Disgrace..SHAME

42…Fibonacci or Galileo..PISAN

43…Poem division..CANTO

46…Mrs. Addams, to Gomez..TISH

47…Concerning..AS TO

48…37-Down, e.g…BEER

49…Besides that..ELSE

52…Parental encouragement..EAT




Return to top of page

20 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 23 Jul 16, Saturday”

    1. Hey Joel! I also noticed the discrepancy. It appears that our Bill hasn’t posted the Sunday solution yet. And, since he usually posts before midnight for the next day’s puzzle, you might have been expecting to see Friday’s puzzle when you posted your first comment. Looking at the times of your posts, tho, it still doesn’t seem to add up….a mystery!!

    2. Sorry about that, Joel, all my fault. I’m over in Ireland on vacation at the moment and am getting rightly confused by the time difference. Hopefully I’ve sort everything out now. All should be back to normal by the end of the week when I get back to sunny California.

  1. 15:31, no errors, iPad. Thoughtful, but straightforward.

    @Bill … In your comments for 25D, I think you meant to type “4 dots” rather than “5 dots” …

  2. I struggled with this one a lot and not sure why because most of it was pretty familiar stuff. On Saturdays some of the clues seem a little obscure to me like “realizes” being “nets” and “Puts into groups” being “assorts”, but I guess that is done on purpose to make it more challenging.
    I never saw “Pulp Fiction” so I missed Uma in her capris. But I have wondered how this awful fashion trend started. Unfortunately, it looks like capris are here to stay.
    I hope everyone is enjoying their weekend!

  3. Big fat DNF for me. Too much stuff out of my confort zone to overcome. I don’t keep track of 19th century dancers, Johnny Depp, Vin Diesel, Goldie Hawn, bridezillas, and I certainly don’t keep track of anything to do with Justin Bieber or Beliebers (Really?!! Ugh).

    Small nit with the clue for “STOOPED TO”. Wouldn’t “Did in an undignified way” work better than “Used in an undignified way?” e.g. I stooped to lying about…That is saying you did something in an undignified way rather than you used something thusly. Anyone think of an exception? It only takes one to make it a valid clue. My mind is drawing a blank.

    ESTIMATES for “They often precede garags sales” was horrible..and therefore brilliant. But the prize of the day goes to MINUS SIGN for “Take out order?” A+ for that one..

    Best –

  4. I went through this puzzle like a hot knife through “buttah” – and that’s after crashing and burning on yesterday’s grid. This seemed awfully easy for a Saturday puzzle, all things considered. I am really having some extreme crossword experiences of late. Who knows what’s going on? Old age may be setting in.

    Have a great weekend all.

  5. @Tony — After a slow start, I too finished quickly, for a Saturday (and about that old-age thing: it ain’t bad once you get used to it ?).
    @Jeff — I think you’re spot on about the cluing on both STOOPED TO and MINUS SIGN. I thought “Parental encouragement” was a little vague for EAT, but making up for it was the clever double-duty cluing for PILOT (“test” in both aviation and TV programming senses) and SHOE STORE (“fitting” in the apt and sizing senses). All around, good job by Ed Sessa.

  6. “BRIDEZILLA”??? Cute, but that’s a new one on me. Could this be a trend? “BOSSZILLA”? “HUSBANDZILLA”? “POLITICIANZILLA”? The possibilities are endless!

  7. @Jeff
    Looks like Ed Sessa got tired of the obvious clue for STOOPS TO, “She ______ Conquer,” and opted for “Used . . . .” but I agree the wording is odd. So is 17Across, where “Perilous place” might better define PRECIPICE than “Perilous situation.”

    By the way, “She Stoops to Conquer” was written by one of Bill’s compatriots, Irishman Oliver Goldsmith, and was first performed in London in 1773, yet the play has had an enduring appeal and can still make even jaded 21st century audiences laugh. Here’s some lines that Jeff may find appropriate for the weekend:

    Let schoolmasters puzzle their brain,
    With grammar, amd nonsense, and learning.
    Good liquor, I stoutly maintain,
    Gives GENIUS a better discerning.

  8. Uh oh . . . looks like I hit the bottle a little too early — the solution was STOOPED TO, not “Stoops to.” Kindly disregard my previous post.

  9. It seems like the answers get harder but actually the queries get stupider. Q: for 30 across could have been, “takeout indicator”. “order” has nothing to do with “sign”. Is there a codex that these hacks use?

  10. Woo Hoo, finished without error, although it took about an hour. Quicker than my last Saturdays. Now I’m up to four, but I think Carrie still has me at about six or seven.

    After VINDIESEL finally fell, then MADEWAVES and MINUSSIGN. STOOPEDTO and SPARROW next, and it was mine.

    We really should have the Fibonacci sequence here: 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 and so on. When graphed it looks like a coil that is unwound at the bottom (ie 1,1) and then coils tighter as the numbers rise.

    On to Sunday…

  11. Hey Dirk! I DNFd this puzzle. I’m at 6 completed Saturdays, so you’re catching up to me and I’ve gotta keep pace!
    I thought today’s was a bit easy for a Saturday, and I do think I would have racked up another win if I had taken more time with it. I thought it was a very well done grid. Mr. Sessa is tough but (kinda) fair, IMO.
    HEY TONY! RE: GETTING OLD–IT’S NOT THAT; IT’S THE HEAT!!
    (At least that’s my excuse LOL….)
    AGAIN I see folks hating on Capri pants!! I love them and wear often. Maybe I don’t look as cute as I think I do!! Dang!
    What I dislike are cropped pants. FWIW: Your classic Capris must be a slim fit, extending to just a couple of inches above the ankle. I think they look lovely on all women.
    Perhaps I’ll compose a 5,000-word treatise on the subject… I’ll be sure to provide a link here….
    Silly stuff! It’s after 2 a.m!
    Sweet dreams~~™?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.