LA Times Crossword Answers 6 Apr 17, Thursday










Constructed by: Kurt Krauss

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Tight Ends

Today’s themed answers end with synonyms of “TIGHT”, terms meaning “drunk”.

  • 61A. Some football linemen … and what the answers to starred clues have? : TIGHT ENDS
  • 17A. *Judy Blume genre : KIDDIE LIT
  • 25A. *Got from the cloud? : DOWNLOADED
  • 36A. *Like much Chinese cooking : STIR-FRIED
  • 51A. *Three-year school, commonly : JUNIOR HIGH

Bill’s time: 8m 53s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Highlands hat : TAM

A tam o’shanter is a man’s cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. “Tams” were originally all blue (and called “blue bonnets”) but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of the Robert Burns poem “Tam O’Shanter”.

14. Botanist Gray : ASA

Asa Gray was an important American botanist in the nineteenth century. He was a lifelong friend of Charles Darwin, albeit mainly through correspondence. Darwin’s book “Forms of Flowers”, was dedicated to Gray.

15. Naproxen brand : ALEVE

Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

16. “__ Mio” : ‘O SOLE

“‘O sole mio” is a famous Italian song from Naples, written in 1898. The song’s lyrics are usually sung in the original Neapolitan, as opposed to Italian. The title translates from Neapolitan into “My Sun” (and not into “O, My Sun” as one might expect). It’s a love song of course, sung by a young man declaring that there is a sun brighter than that in the sky, the sun that is his lover’s face. Awww …

17. *Judy Blume genre : KIDDIE LIT

Judy Blume writes novels for children and young adults. Blume’s novels for teens were groundbreaking when first published, tackling such difficult subjects as racism, divorce and bullying.

20. Calendario start : ENERO

In Spanish, we start the “año” (year) in “enero” (January) as noted on a “calendario” (calendar).

21. Sierra __ : LEONE

The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa, lying on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were granted British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

23. Former Radiohead label : EMI

EMI was a British music company, with the abbreviation standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

Radiohead is an alternative rock band from England that formed in 1985. When the band self-released their 2007 studio album “In Rainbows”, it was a big deal for the music industry. Radiohead offered a digital version of the album using a pay-what-you-want pricing model. Reportedly, most fans paid what would be a normal retail price for the download version of the album. That’s not bad, considering the relatively low cost to produce a download compared to the cost of producing a CD.

24. __ Valley: Reagan Library site : SIMI

Nowadays Simi Valley, California is perhaps best known as home to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. The library is a great place to visit, and there you can tour one of the retired Air Force One planes.

25. *Got from the cloud? : DOWNLOADED

In the world of computing, when one operates “in the cloud”, one’s files and key applications are not stored on one’s own computer, but rather are residing “in the cloud”, on a computer somewhere out on the Internet. I do 90% of my computing in the cloud. That way I don’t have to worry about backing up files, and I can operate from any computer if I have to …

31. Single-celled creature : AMEBA

An ameba (or “amoeba”, as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

35. Sinusitis docs : ENTS

Ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT)

The suffix “-itis” is used to denote inflammation, as in laryngitis (inflammation of the larynx), otitis (inflammation of the ear) and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses).

39. Reebok rival : PUMA

Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide. The company is most famous for its line of soccer boots.

The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term “roe buck”.

42. Dapper : NATTY

A natty dresser is one who dresses smartly. The term may come from the Middle English “net” meaning “fine, elegant”, in which case it shares its etymology with the word “neat”.

43. Cal. pages : MOS

The pages in a calendar (cal.) usually show whole months (mos.)

55. Julie’s “Doctor Zhivago” co-star : OMAR

Omar Sharif was a great Hollywood actor from Egypt, someone who played major roles in memorable movies such as “Doctor Zhivago” and “Lawrence of Arabia”. But to me, he was my bridge hero (the card game). In his heyday, Sharif was one of the best bridge players in the world.

Julie Christie is a very talented British actress, actually born in British India. One of Christie’s most famous roles was Lara in the the epic 1965 film “Doctor Zhivago”.

“Doctor Zhivago” is an epic novel by Boris Pasternak, first published in 1957. I haven’t tried to read it the book, but the 1965 film version is a must-see, directed by David Lean and starring Omar Sharif in the title role. The story centers on Yuri Zhivago, a doctor and poet, and how he is affected by the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War.

56. Subj. with unknowns : ALG

Algebra (alg.) is a branch of mathematics in which arithmetical operations are performed on variables rather than specific numbers (x,y etc). The term “algebra” comes from the Arabic “al jebr” meaning “reunion of broken parts”.

63. 1999-2004 Olds : ALERO

The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

66. Printing flourish : SERIF

Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif, using the French word “sans” meaning “without” and “serif” from the Dutch “schreef” meaning “line”. Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I’m not so sure though …

67. Freelancer’s supply: Abbr. : SASES

An SAE is a “stamped, addressed envelope”. An SASE is a “self-addressed, stamped envelope”.

The term “free lance” was coined by Sir Walter Scott in his 1820 novel “Ivanhoe”, using it to describe a medieval mercenary warrior. Forty years later, a freelancer was a journalist who did work for more than one publication without a long-term commitment.

Down

1. Occupies oneself with, as a hobby : TAKES UP

Back in the 16th century, a hobbyhorse was a mock horse that was used as a prop in morris dancing. The figure was wrapped around the waist of a dancer, creating the impression that the horse was being ridden. By the 1580s, the term “hobbyhorse” began to describe toy riding horse used by a child. A century later, the word “hobby” was being used for a favorite pastime, an activity that doesn’t real go anywhere, just like a hobbyhorse.

2. Just plain silly : ASININE

The adjective “asinine” means “stupid, obstinate”, and comes from the Latin for “like an ass”.

3. Mob inductee : MADE MAN

In the Mafia, a “made man” is a fully initiated member. A made man might also be called a goodfella or a wiseguy.

4. Scott of “Arrested Development” : BAIO

Scott Baio is the actor who played Chachi Arcola in the great sitcom “Happy Days” and in the not-so-great spinoff “Joanie Loves Chachi”. Baio also played the title role in a later sitcom called “Charles in Charge”. Earlier in his career, he played another title role, in the 1976 movie “Bugsy Malone”, appearing opposite a young Jodie Foster.

“Arrested Development” is a sitcom that originally aired on Fox from 2003 to 2006. Ron Howard was heavily involved in the show behind the camera, serving as executive producer and also as the show’s narrator. Fifteen new episodes of “Arrested Development” were filmed specifically for release on Netflix in 2013, and there may even be a movie on the way.

6. Mello __ : YELLO

Like so many beverages introduced by the Coca-Cola Company, Mello Yello was launched to compete against a successful drink already on the market. Mello Yello first hit the shelves in 1979, and was designed to take market share from Pepsico’s “Mountain Dew”.

7. “__ From the Bridge”: Miller : A VIEW

“A View From the Bridge” is a play by Arthur Miller. It has an unusual structure for a play first performed in 1955 in that it is a verse-drama, meaning that all of the dialog is spoken in the form of verse, somewhat like the works of Shakespeare.

Arthur Miller was a remarkable playwright, best known for his plays “Death of a Salesman” and “The Crucible”. Famously, Arthur Miller left his first wife to marry Marilyn Monroe in 1956. The two divorced five years later, just over a year before Monroe died of an apparent drug overdose.

8. Wyoming county : TETON

Teton County, Wyoming is home to the Grand Teton National Park and the town of Jackson Hole. Teton has the distinction of having the second highest personal per capita income of any county in the US ($94,672 in 2010), second only to New York County ($111,386 in 2010).

10. Metric lead-in : ISO-

The word “isometric” comes from Greek, and means “having equal measurement”. Isometric exercise is a resistance exercise in which the muscle does not change in length (and the joint angle stays the same). The alternative would be dynamic exercises, ones using the joint’s full range of motion.

18. Trifle : DRIB

A “drib” is a negligible amount, as in “dribs and drabs”.

22. N.Y. Mets division : NLE

National League East (NLE)

The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” (aka “Amazin’ Mets”) who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

25. __-glace: rich sauce : DEMI

Demi-glace is a sauce that’s rich and brown, and is used in French cuisine. The name translates as “half glaze” and comprises veal stock mixed with espagnole sauce. It’s a little more work to make demi-glace, as one has to also make an espagnole sauce as one of the main ingredients. As a result, some chefs just use a veal stock instead, which Julia Child used to call a “semi-demi-glace”.

28. Long. counterpart : LAT

Lines of latitude are the imaginary horizontal lines surrounding the planet. The most “important” lines of latitude are, from north to south:

  • Arctic Circle
  • Tropic of Cancer
  • Equator
  • Tropic of Capricorn
  • Antarctic Circle

32. Coastal eagle : ERN

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also called the white-tailed eagle, or the sea-eagle.

33. Museum curator’s deg. : BFA

The degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) is primarily designed for students intent on pursuing a career in the visual or performing arts.

The term “curator” is Latin and applies to a manager, guardian or overseer. In English, the original curators were the guardians and overseers of minors and those with mental disease.

36. __-Flush: household cleaner : SANI

Sani-Flush was a toilet bowl cleaner that was introduced in 1911. The product’s active ingredient was sodium bisulfate, which dissolved accumulated minerals on the bowl’s surface. Sodium bisulfate forms highly corrosive sulfuric acid when it mixes with water, and it is the acid which dissolves the undesirable and staining minerals. Sani-Flush was quietly withdrawn from the US market around 2009 due to environmental concerns.

38. Network logo : EYE

CBS used to be known as the Columbia Broadcasting System. It is the second-largest broadcaster in the world, second only to the BBC in the UK. CBS introduced its “eye” logo in 1951.

39. Overnight bag item, maybe : PAJAMAS

Our word “pajamas” (“PJs” for short) comes to us from the Indian subcontinent, where “pai jamahs” were loose fitting pants tied at the waist and worn at night by locals and ultimately by the Europeans living there. And “pajamas” is another of those words that I had to learn to spell differently when I came to America. In the British Isles the spelling is “pyjamas”.

40. Elvis played one in “Blue Hawaii” : UKULELE

“Blue Hawaii” is one a series of Elvis Presley movies, this one released in 1961. 36-year-old Angela Lansbury was cast as the mother of the character played by 26-year-old Presley. Apparently, Lansbury “wasn’t amused”, but took the role anyway.

43. Souvenir : MEMENTO

A “souvenir” is a memento, a token of remembrance. We imported the word from French, in which language it has the same meaning. The term comes from the Latin “subvenire” meaning “to come to mind”, or literally “to come up”.

45. Berlin boulevard : STRASSE

“Strasse” is the German word for “street”.

Berlin is the capital and largest city in Germany, and is the second most populous city in the European Union (after London).

47. Myriad : TONS OF

The term “myriad”, meaning “innumerable”, comes from the Greek “muraid”, meaning “ten thousand”. “Myriad” is one of those words that sporks heated debate about the correct usage in English. “Myriad” can be used both as an adjective and a noun. One can have “a myriad of” engagements around the holidays, for example, or “myriad” engagements around those same holidays.

50. “Encore!” : MORE!

“Encore” is French for “again, one more time”, and is a shout that an audience member will make here in North America to request another song, say. But, the term is not used this way in France. Rather, the audience will shout “Bis!”, which is the Italian for “twice!”

53. Turner autobiography : I, TINA

“I, Tina” is the 1986 autobiography of Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” The film version was released in 1993 and starring Angela Bassett as Tina Turner.

54. “We Got the Beat” band : GOGOS

The Go-Go’s were an all-female rock band that was formed in Los Angeles back in 1978. The band’s biggest hit is “We Got the Beat”, which was released in 1982. The best-known member of the Go-Go’s is probably Belinda Carlisle.

58. Casino fixtures : ATMS

The “casino” originated in the 1700s, first describing a public room for music or dancing. The name “casino” is a diminutive of “casa” meaning “house”.

60. Part of TNT : TRI-

“TNT” is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

62. Charlemagne’s domain: Abbr. : HRE

Charlemagne was the first king to use the title “Holy Roman Emperor”, even though the Holy Roman Empire was not actually founded until over a century later when Otto I was crowned Emperor. Otto was the first of an unbroken line of Holy Roman Emperors who ruled Central Europe until 1806.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Highlands hat : TAM

4. Serenade, as the moon : BAY AT

9. Pearl seeker : DIVER

14. Botanist Gray : ASA

15. Naproxen brand : ALEVE

16. “__ Mio” : ‘O SOLE

17. *Judy Blume genre : KIDDIE LIT

19. Bags with handles : TOTES

20. Calendario start : ENERO

21. Sierra __ : LEONE

23. Former Radiohead label : EMI

24. __ Valley: Reagan Library site : SIMI

25. *Got from the cloud? : DOWNLOADED

27. Not having the know-how : UNABLE

29. Locomotive, e.g. : ENGINE

30. Compose, in a way : PEN

31. Single-celled creature : AMEBA

35. Sinusitis docs : ENTS

36. *Like much Chinese cooking : STIR-FRIED

39. Reebok rival : PUMA

42. Dapper : NATTY

43. Cal. pages : MOS

46. Like : AKIN TO

49. Unite securely : CEMENT

51. *Three-year school, commonly : JUNIOR HIGH

55. Julie’s “Doctor Zhivago” co-star : OMAR

56. Subj. with unknowns : ALG

57. “Cool!” : NEATO!

58. Concert venue : ARENA

59. Softens : MELTS

61. Some football linemen … and what the answers to starred clues have? : TIGHT ENDS

63. 1999-2004 Olds : ALERO

64. Vast, in verse : ENORM

65. How-__: do-it-yourselfers’ buys : TOS

66. Printing flourish : SERIF

67. Freelancer’s supply: Abbr. : SASES

68. Fused : ONE

Down

1. Occupies oneself with, as a hobby : TAKES UP

2. Just plain silly : ASININE

3. Mob inductee : MADE MAN

4. Scott of “Arrested Development” : BAIO

5. Tavern favorite : ALE

6. Mello __ : YELLO

7. “__ From the Bridge”: Miller : A VIEW

8. Wyoming county : TETON

9. Act grandmotherly toward : DOTE ON

10. Metric lead-in : ISO-

11. Elected : VOTED IN

12. Gold or silver : ELEMENT

13. Lives : RESIDES

18. Trifle : DRIB

22. N.Y. Mets division : NLE

25. __-glace: rich sauce : DEMI

26. Got on in years : AGED

28. Long. counterpart : LAT

32. Coastal eagle : ERN

33. Museum curator’s deg. : BFA

34. Oils, e.g. : ART

36. __-Flush: household cleaner : SANI

37. Bite symptom : ITCH

38. Network logo : EYE

39. Overnight bag item, maybe : PAJAMAS

40. Elvis played one in “Blue Hawaii” : UKULELE

41. One working the crowd : MINGLER

43. Souvenir : MEMENTO

44. With no end in sight : ON AND ON

45. Berlin boulevard : STRASSE

47. Myriad : TONS OF

48. Pay dirt : ORE

50. “Encore!” : MORE!

52. Can’t take : HATES

53. Turner autobiography : I, TINA

54. “We Got the Beat” band : GOGOS

58. Casino fixtures : ATMS

60. Part of TNT : TRI-

62. Charlemagne’s domain: Abbr. : HRE

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21 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 6 Apr 17, Thursday”

  1. Easy puzzle. Impossible theme. After completing the grid I tried for a minute or two to get the theme. Came up with nothing. When I came to the blog I was glad I only spent a minute on it. I never heard TIGHT to mean drunk. Even so, FRIED and HIGH aren’t used much to mean drunk. Wow. Stretch of a theme. Maybe TIGHT is used more commonly in the U.K.?

    Otherwise, pretty easy Thursday. Origin of the word “hobby” is interesting. Does that mean doing crosswords gets us nowhere? Hmmmm

    Best –

    1. Three errors, 72 minutes on the second half. Much more interesting grid. 50-Down was incredibly goofy – and where the errors came from.

  2. Like @Jeff, didn’t get the theme. I used to hear tight – old school.

    Had to Google for TNT. TriNitroToluene

    Thank you, Kurt Krauss for Strasse. Btw, when I was a kid, laufen meant “to run.” Now it seems to mean “to walk.” Is the world speeding up, or is spaziergehen too weird?

  3. 12:41. At one point during the solve, I made one of those online-solve mistakes where you type in a long entry without noticing that it’s going across rather than down or vice-versa, so you go back and fix as much of the damage as you can find, but then … at the end, I got the silent treatment, eventually found an “L” instead of an “S” at the intersection of GOGOS and SASES, and honestly don’t know how it got there. So let’s call it an error …

    Since I updated IOS on my iPad, the LAT site has mostly stopped the annoying flashing it was doing. Nevertheless, I tried out the Mensa access to the LAT puzzles and found that it has now stopped working. I think it has something to do with JAVA (or is it JAVASCRIPT? – I’m not quite sure how those two things are related). As I recall, my iMac browsers also have trouble with those plug-ins (security issues, I think?). Computers, however useful they may be, are going to be the death of us all … ?

    Yesterday, I had that broken tooth extracted and another titanium post implanted. Afterwards, I spent an hour or so giving evidence to the police about an accident that I witnessed on the street the day before. It is now my intention to close the blinds and sit quietly for the couple of weeks until my SO and I leave on our trip. Back spasms, a cold, an appendectomy, $7000 worth of work on my house, a broken tooth, and an accident on my quiet residential block. Sheesh. Perhaps if I keep a low enough profile, the gods will be motivated not to throw anything else at me for awhile … ?

    1. Dave – it’s a shame you won’t be flying across the Bermuda Triangle on Friday the 13th. I also recommend avoiding the lottery and Las Vegas right now… 🙂

      Best

  4. The only thing that was a problem was thinking the Turner autobiography was about TED TURNER. Sheesh, we’ve seen that I TINA answer a few times before. Finally dawned on me.
    Total blank on the theme. Thanks, Bill!
    Never heard of MADE MAN, but it was the only answer that made sense.

    1. Joel –

      A made man is one who is officially made part of a crime family. There’s a whole ceremony associated with it. They used to cut the person’s hand as well as the head of the family’s hand and shake – ie giving them the same blood. I don’t think that’s done anymore, but who knows.

      It’s kind of like being made a partner in a law firm, but not as sleezy……

      Best –

  5. No offense, Mr. Krauss, but anyone also solving the NYT or WSJ puzzles on a Thursday would have to wonder if you’d been assigned to construct an egregiously easy one.

    1. Or it was more of a function of editing than “assignment”. Krauss has today’s WSJ as well (as I noted up above, which is why I felt moved to comment here). He’s proven there he’s more than capable of a much harder/interesting grid than today’s.

      Which does make me wonder about how Fri or Sat will go this week in LAT land . . .

  6. The Mensa site allowing access to the LAT crosswords makes use of the “Flash” plug-in (not “Java” or “Javascript”, as I had speculated above). My iMac warns me that using “Flash” poses a security risk, but allows me to continue, if I so choose. My iPad doesn’t even go that far: the area where I would expect to find the solver is just blank.

    In other news: I have downloaded the WSJ Friday puzzle and am mentally preparing myself to do battle with this week’s contest. Last week, I saw everything about the puzzle that I needed to see to come up with the answer they wanted, but I couldn’t put the pieces together.

    1. @David
      FWIW, already did it. About 35 minutes, minus Natick City, and about 5 minutes on the meta (won’t have to post tomorrow).

      1. @Glenn … Okay, I did today’s WSJ in 11:18, with no errors, but it took me at least 20 minutes to figure out the metapuzzle. Those things really have me psyched out … but at least, this time, I won’t have to take it to bed with me for the next four nights … and I deserve that mug … my luck is changing … I can feel it … ?

        1. @David
          Most of the time the meta puzzles are just “you either get it or you don’t” affairs (btw, there’s several out there in the world to do, if you just want to do them and don’t necessarily care about a prize like the mug). I haven’t tried metas for about 2 or 3 weeks now kind of because that “spent time” thing (rather would do crosswords), but usually what I do is I work them for about a night (off and on) and then if I don’t see it by the time I sleep, I just move on. Sat & Sun puzzles usually are more interesting to me than staring at a meta. I often have thought of going through several (been doing them off and on for about a year or so now) and trying for a “solving guide” better than the one posted at the WSJ, but really haven’t been motivated enough to go for it. Of course, I got other things I need to be pushing myself to do that are non-crossword related and more important, so kind of how it goes.

  7. I had a fairly tough time with this puzzle – never even wondered about the theme. I was lucky to finish, I’m bloodied but alive. …. but a very nice puzzle.
    I thought the biography for Turner was I, Lana. Ooops, wrong half of the century.

    Dave, hope this is the end of your bad streak. Some tooth problems, cost even more than $ 7,000. I can remember a dentist joke, but it wil take too much space and time …..

    Jeff, I loved your comment …. “not sleazy enough”. CPA firms also have partners who make big bucks, and sometimes they can even destroy the firm – Arthur Andersen, for instance.

    On Bravo: More (!) ….. Bill, …. so the french say,’Bis’ – which means ‘twice’. The first thing that came to my mind that Bis ( more as in, Bee-ss ) in Hindi and Urdu, and some other related tongues, means ‘twenty’…..

    I was surprised that Jackson Hole, Teton county has the second highest per capita income in the US and that ~ NYC is first. ….

    I always thought that the highest per capita income was in Virginia, or MD, adjacent to Wash DC, where all the federal politicians / lobby-ists / judges / big law firms etc. live. In this Wiki article, Wy or NYC doesn’t even make the list ….

    Federal and government officials will clobber the rich landed folks, in median household income, every time …. The government is made up of truly ‘made’ men, and women.
    I’ve been to Jackson Hole, three times, but with my luck – all I met was expensive rental homes, … and expensive housemaids, and over priced souvenirs. I also picked up a ton of Sage, which is present in a million bushes, all over the place, and gets trapped in the wheels of your rented car. If there are rich people, they are probably very discreet.

    have a nice day, all.

  8. In all fairness, Bill’s statistics refer to “Personal per capita income” by county.
    The Wiki article refers to ” Highest MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD income” by county.
    The first is an arithmetic mean, per person…. The average per capita.
    The second is a median ( half higher, half lower ….) per household.

    Not quite … apples to apples.
    In my humble opinion, the median is far more significant, and is generally always lower than the mean, in most of such statistics.

    For instance, in salaries for basketball players, in the NBA, the average per player is, $ 4,655,000 , but the median of all salaries, in the NBA is ……… (only – ) $ 1,825,000. or ~ 39 percent of the former.

  9. Very easy Thursday, for me; no errors, while selling my honey at the Farmer’s market. It was a little slow, selling wise, since it was raining and a little windy, but finished the puzzle during the market, rather than later at home. Had HATEd/dASES which had me paused for a minute.

    Hope this is what tomorrow and the weekend calls for, but we’ll see.

  10. Hi gang!
    Agreed — easy Thursday, and it seemed like a classic Wednesday to me. Got the theme once I had the whole puzzle done. I remember “tight” meaning “drunk” from 40s movies.
    Sfingi! Yes, the world is moving faster! Your comment reminded me of a joke I once heard:
    –What do you call a microwave wok?
    –A run!

    Dave, take care!! Here’s one more: do NOT walk under any ladders!!
    Good advice at any time, I suppose….???
    Be well~~™???

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