LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Aug 2017, Saturday










Constructed by: Matthew Sewell

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 12m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Bass-baritone role in an 1885 Savoy Theatre premiere : MIKADO

“The Mikado” is a wonderful comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan, set in the exotic location of Japan. “Mikado” is a former term for the “Emperor of Japan”. In the opera, Ko-Ko is the name of the Lord High Executioner of Titipu.

The Savoy Theatre In London’s West End was built specifically for Gilbert and Sullivan by the impresario Richard D’Oyly Carte, who also founded the opera company that took his name. The D’Oyly Carte Opera Company staged the Gilbert and Sullivan’s Savoy Operas, the series of works that were presented in said theater.

7. King Features Syndicate parent : HEARST

Hearst is a mass media company that owns many newspapers, magazines and television entities including the “San Francisco Chronicle”, “Cosmopolitan” and significant share of ESPN. The Hearst company was founded in 1987 by William Randolph Hearst, with several of the founder’s descendents still actively involved in the business.

King Features Syndicate is a company that distributes comic strip, newspaper columns and puzzles to many newspapers around the world.

13. Brown world? : ACADEME

“Academe” is a term used for the academic world. The expression “the groves of academe” is a reference to the location of Plato’s original “Academy” in a walled-off grove of olive trees just outside Athens.

Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island is one of the eight Ivy League schools. Brown has been around a long time, founded in 1764, years before America declared independence from England. The university took the name of Brown in 1804 after one Nicholas Brown, Jr. gave a substantial gift to the school. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Brown Bears, and their mascot is Bruno.

19. MSN, for one : ISP

The Microsoft Network (MSN) used to be an Internet service provider (ISP). These days, MSN is mainly a web portal.

20. Wore with jaunty confidence : ROCKED

Our words “jaunty” and “genteel” are related in that they both derive from the French “gentil” meaning “nice, pleasing”. In modern usage, someone described as jaunty has a buoyant air. Someone described as genteel is refined in manner.

22. Scuttle : NIX

The use of “nix” as a verb, meaning “to shoot down”, dates back to the early 1900s. Before that “nix” was just a noun meaning “nothing”. “Nix” comes from the German “nichts”, which also means “nothing”.

26. 11, at times: Abbr. : NOV

November is the eleventh month in our calendar. The name comes from the Latin “novem” meaning “nine”, as November was the ninth month in the ancient Roman calendar.

28. Vital vessels : AORTAS

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

30. W-9 filers : NEW HIRES

IRS form W-9 is a Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification. The W-9 is filled out by employees and used by employers for payroll purposes. The form is not submitted to the IRS.

35. Panasonic flat-screen : VIERA

Not so long ago, Panasonic was called Matsushita Electronics, the name it took from its founder when the company started in 1918. The products manufactured back then were lamp sockets, and in 1927 the company introduced a bicycle lamp. Even after the company became famous for producing electrical and electronic goods, Matsushita had a very successful line of Panasonic bicycles, as the founder was raised in a family with a bicycle shop and he was passionate about cycling.

36. Welsh herder : CORGI

The Welsh corgi is a herding dog that originated in Britain, with two recognized breeds: the Pembroke and Cardigan. Corgis aren’t speedy enough to do their job by running around livestock like collies, and instead nip at the heels.

44. Four-time WWE World Champion Brock __ : LESNAR

Professional wrestler Brock Lesnar is the youngest person to win the WWE Championship, doing so just over a month after turning 25 years old. In total, Lesnar has won the WWE Championship four times.

World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) is a company promoting professional wrestling as a form of entertainment.

49. Curling piece : STONE

I think curling is such a cool game (pun!). It’s somewhat like bowls, but played on a sheet of ice. The sport was supposedly invented in medieval Scotland, and is called curling because of the action of the granite stone is it moves across the ice. A player can make the stone take a curved path (“curl”) by causing it to slowly rotate as it slides.

51. How cherries jubilee is served : FLAMBE

Flambé is the French word for “flamed”, and was originally a term used to describe certain types of porcelain. The word “flambé” crept into cookery just after 1900.

Cherries jubilee might be considered a “light” dessert, certainly not due to the calorie count, but rather due to the “lighting” of the liqueur that is poured over the cherries. Usually one takes cherries, pours a liqueur like Kirschwasser (German for “cherry water”) and then sets the liqueur alight and flambés the cherries. The reduced liqueur and cherries are then poured as a source over vanilla ice cream. Apparently the recipe was invented by French Chef Auguste Escoffier at the Savoy Hotel restaurant in London, to celebrate one of Queen Victoria’s jubilees.

54. Dungeons & Dragons bird : ROC

The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants. The roc was said to come from the Indian subcontinent. The supposed existence of the roc was promulgated by Marco Polo in the accounts that he published of his travels through Asia.

Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game (RPG) introduced in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my youngest son …

57. 1984 Winter Olympics city : SARAJEVO

Sarajevo is the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The city is famous for many historical events. In 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated there, the single event that sparked off WWI. More happily, Sarajevo was the host of the 1984 Winter Olympic Games. Just over a decade later the city was the center of the longest siege in the history of modern warfare, lasting almost four years from 1992 to 1996.

61. Alito and Thomas : YALE MEN

Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

Clarence Thomas is the second African American to serve on the US Supreme Court. Thomas replaced Thurgood Marshall who was the first American with African heritage to serve. Thomas is generally regarded as the most conservative member of the court. He doesn’t have a lot say, verbally anyway. Thomas made a joking remark in January 2013 during oral argument, the first time he had spoken at all during oral argument for almost seven years.

62. Danny, vis-à-vis the “Bloodline” siblings : ELDEST

“Bloodline” is a Netflix-original thriller television series. It’s a cleverly constructed program about a well-off family in the Florida Keys. As the show progresses, more and more dark secrets are revealed about each of the family members. I enjoyed this one …

63. Sharp weapons : SABERS

A saber (sometimes “sabre”) is a sword with a curved blade and a relatively large hand guard. It is thought that the term originated with the Hungarian verb “szabni” meaning “to cut”.

Down

1. Best Supporting Actress two years after Whoopi : MARISA

Marisa Tomei’s first screen role was in the daytime soap “As the World Turns”, but her break came with a recurring role in “The Cosby Show” spinoff “A Different World”. Tomei won an Oscar for her delightful performance in “My Cousin Vinny” in 1992.

The magnificent Whoopi Goldberg’s real name is Caryn Elaine Johnson. Goldberg is multi-talented, and is one of a very short list of entertainers to have won all four major showbiz awards:

  • an Oscar (for “Ghost”)
  • an Emmy (two, for “The View”)
  • a Grammy (for “Thoroughly Modern Millie”, as a producer)
  • a Tony (also for producing “Thoroughly Modern Millie”)

3. ’90s loser to Deep Blue : KASPAROV

Garry Kasparov is a Russian chess grandmaster and former World Chess Champion. When he first became champion in 1985 he was 22 years old, making him the youngest ever undisputed World Chess Champion. Kasparov retired in 2005 in order to pursue a career in Russian politics.

Deep Blue was a computer developed by IBM specifically for playing chess. In 1996 it became the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. The champion in question was the great Garry Kasparov, although he came out on top in the end by winning the 6-game competition 4-2.

6. “Rubáiyát” poet : OMAR

Omar Khayyam was a Persian with many talents. He was a poet as well as an important mathematician, astronomer and physician. A selection of his poems were translated by one Edward Fitzgerald in a collection called “Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam”. Here are some famous lines from that collection:

Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough,
A Flask of Wine, a Book of Verse — and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness —
And Wilderness is Paradise enow.

8. Israel’s Olmert : EHUD

Ehud Olmert took over as Acting Prime Minister when Ariel Sharon suffered a severe stroke early in 2006. Olmert then led his party to victory in a general election held later that same year. He held Israel’s highest office in his own right until 2009, when he had to step down facing allegations of corruption.

9. Sharp-edged tool : ADZ

An adze (also “adz”) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool’s shaft. An axe’s blade is set in line with the shaft.

10. Nine Inch Nails founder Trent : REZNOR

Nine Inch Nails is the name of a rock band that was founded in Cleveland, Ohio in 1988 by singer-songwriter Trent Reznor. Reznor chose the name “Nine Inch Nails” mainly because it abbreviated easily and succinctly, to “NIN”.

11. Briny : SALINE

The “briny” is the sea, from “brine” meaning “salty water”. The term “briny” was originally used for “tears”.

12. Natural history museum attractions, briefly : T REXES

The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written “T. rex”) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. “Tyrannosaurus” comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard) and “rex” the Latin for “king”. They were big beasts, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

14. School with trimesters called halves : ETON

London’s Eton College has three academic terms, although those three terms are known as “halves”. That name dates back to when the school year was split into two halves. The current terms are:

  • The Michaelmas Half (early September to mid-December)
  • The Lent Half (mid-January to late March)
  • The Summer Half (late April to late-June/early-July)

21. Bellyache : KVETCH

The word “kvetch” comes to us from Yiddish, with “kvetshn” meaning “to complain” or “squeeze”.

24. Kan. Army installation : FT RILEY

Fort Riley is an active military installation in Northeast Kansas. The original fort was built in 1853 and was named for a Major General Bennet C. Riley who led the first military escort along the Santa Fe trail. The fort itself was established to protect travellers on the Oregon, California and Santa Fe Trails. Fort Riley became a major post for the US Cavalry and, in 1865, it was home to the renowned George Custer.

29. Cape Cod catch : SCROD

Scrod is the name given to fish that has been “scrawed” i.e. split open, dried and then broiled.

Cape Cod is indeed named after the fish. It was first called Cape Cod by English navigator Bartholomew Gosnold in 1602 as his men caught so many fish there.

31. Forensics ridge : WHORL

Fingerprint patterns are classified into three different patterns: loops, whorls and arches.

32. Stallone roles, e.g. : HEROES

If ever there was a movie that defines a career breakthrough for an actor, it would have to be “Rocky” for Sylvester Stallone. Stallone was a struggling actor in 1975 when a Muhammad Ali fight inspired Stallone to write a screenplay for a boxing movie, which he did in just three days. His efforts to sell the script went well but for the fact that the interested studios wanted a big name for the lead role, and Stallone was determined to be the star himself. Stallone persevered and “Rocky” was eventually made with him playing title role of Rocky Balboa. The movie won three Oscars, and “Sly” Stallone had arrived …

34. Sitting Bull’s people : LAKOTA

The Lakota people are Native Americans from the Great Plains, occupying lands mainly in North and South Dakota. The list of famous persons from the Lakota people includes Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, who were instrumental in the Lakota victory at the Battle of Little Bighorn.

Sitting Bull was a Hunkpapa Lakota Native American who led his people in resisting settlement of tribal lands. Sitting Bull is most notably associated with the victory over the US Cavalry, led by Lt. Col. Custer, at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. US forces pursued Sitting Bull for five years after Little Bighorn until he surrendered in 1881. He was held as a prisoner of war for almost two years before being released onto a reservation. In 1884, he was allowed to leave the reservation and joined Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show, where he earned a tidy sum for a few months. Several years later an order was issued for his arrest due to concern that he was about to flee his reservation. Sitting Bull was shot during an altercation as he was being taken into custody.

40. German royal house, 1714-1901 : HANOVER

The House of Hanover is a German royal dynasty that was founded in 1635. Famously, members of the House of Hanover sat on the British throne from 1714 (the coronation of George I) until 1901 (the death of Queen Victoria).

41. Knight aide : SQUIRE

A squire can be an escort, say one attending to a woman. A squire is also a young nobleman who attended a knight in days of yore. A fun example would be Sancho Panza who accompanied the deluded Don Quixote.

48. Weird Al song that wonders, “Tell me why I bid on Shatner’s old toupee” : EBAY

“eBay” is one of Weird Al Yankovic’s parody songs. This one is a parody of “I Want It That Way” by the Backstreet Boys.

William Shatner is a Canadian actor, famous for playing Captain James T. Kirk in the original “Star Trek” television series. Shatner was trained as a classical Shakespearean actor, and appeared on stage in many of the Bard’s works early in his career. While playing the Kirk character, he developed a reputation for over-acting, really emphasizing some words in a speech and using an excessive number of pauses. He gave his name to a word “shatneresque”, which describes such a style.

“Weird Al” Yankovic is a singer-songwriter who is noted for writing and performing parodies of popular songs. Of the 150 or so such songs, the best known are probably “Eat It” (parodying “Beat It” by Michael Jackson) and “Like a Surgeon” (parodying “Like a Virgin” by Madonna).

58. Like : A LA

The phrase “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

59. Politico with a father, brother and son named George : JEB

Jeb Bush is the son of President George H. W. Bush, and the brother of President George W. Bush. I always thought that Jeb was an American nickname for James or Joseph but I must be wrong, because George and Barbara’s son John Ellis Bush is called “Jeb”. A kind blog reader has suggested the the name “Jeb” may have been chosen as JEB are the initials of John Ellis Bush.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Bass-baritone role in an 1885 Savoy Theatre premiere : MIKADO

7. King Features Syndicate parent : HEARST

13. Brown world? : ACADEME

15. “I have a bad feeling about this” : OH DEAR

16. Strike a chord : RESONATE

18. There’s one right in front of you : PUZZLE

19. MSN, for one : ISP

20. Wore with jaunty confidence : ROCKED

22. Scuttle : NIX

23. Most of a pool cue : SHAFT

26. 11, at times: Abbr. : NOV

27. Cooked : DONE

28. Vital vessels : AORTAS

30. W-9 filers : NEW HIRES

33. Look for business? : WORK CLOTHES

35. Panasonic flat-screen : VIERA

36. Welsh herder : CORGI

38. Peruse, as a catalog : LOOK THROUGH

41. Majesty : SPLENDOR

44. Four-time WWE World Champion Brock __ : LESNAR

46. Wharf : QUAY

47. Dressy accessory : TIE

49. Curling piece : STONE

50. Audible pauses : UMS

51. How cherries jubilee is served : FLAMBE

54. Dungeons & Dragons bird : ROC

55. Shout on arrival : I’M HERE!

57. 1984 Winter Olympics city : SARAJEVO

60. Strongly suggest : REEK OF

61. Alito and Thomas : YALE MEN

62. Danny, vis-à-vis the “Bloodline” siblings : ELDEST

63. Sharp weapons : SABERS

Down

1. Best Supporting Actress two years after Whoopi : MARISA

2. Exhibition with blades : ICE SHOW

3. ’90s loser to Deep Blue : KASPAROV

4. Flap : ADO

5. Forest digs : DEN

6. “Rubáiyát” poet : OMAR

7. Word before and after against : HOPE

8. Israel’s Olmert : EHUD

9. Sharp-edged tool : ADZ

10. Nine Inch Nails founder Trent : REZNOR

11. Briny : SALINE

12. Natural history museum attractions, briefly : T REXES

14. School with trimesters called halves : ETON

17. Cheap opening : ECONO-

21. Bellyache : KVETCH

24. Kan. Army installation : FT RILEY

25. Go up against : TAKE ON

27. Turn off and then some : DISGUST

29. Cape Cod catch : SCROD

31. Forensics ridge : WHORL

32. Stallone roles, e.g. : HEROES

34. Sitting Bull’s people : LAKOTA

37. “Forget I said anything” : IGNORE ME

39. Downsizes : TRIMS

40. German royal house, 1714-1901 : HANOVER

41. Knight aide : SQUIRE

42. Buffet : PUMMEL

43. Tied up : LASHED

45. Scouting ops : RECONS

48. Weird Al song that wonders, “Tell me why I bid on Shatner’s old toupee” : EBAY

51. Picked dos : ‘FROS

52. Took off : LEFT

53. Noteworthy times : ERAS

56. Stretch (out) : EKE

58. Like : A LA

59. Politico with a father, brother and son named George : JEB

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12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Aug 2017, Saturday”

  1. 24 minutes, no errors on this. WSJ (partially done last night), and Newsday Stumper (aka Matthew Sewell Round 2) to come when I get a chance.

    @Carrie
    Superman and Clark Kent are technically the same person, but Clark Kent is what Superman does when he’s not being Superman so he can blend into the world. As far as people know about him, Clark Kent was born in Smallville out somewhere in the middle of the USA. Just like any other person.

    @Megan
    Friday WSJ puzzles have what’s called a meta puzzle attached to them. It’s a question that’s answered by doing some degree of logical manipulation to the puzzle in some way to find certain oddities. You should have seen it. What we were saying is that Joe gave a hint to how to answer the meta question. Since there’s a contest involved, it’s typically considered somewhat bad form to offer hints/answers until the contest has expired (Sunday night, 11:59pm Eastern).

    @Jeff
    But do you have health problems? Caffeine isn’t healthy to habitually consume by a long shot. I’m figuring that out.

  2. 14:59, no errors, several guesses (notably, LESNAR and REZNOR – sheesh).

    I haven’t started today’s Newsday and WSJ puzzles, but I did figure out the meta from yesterday’s WSJ (so at least I won’t have that itch in my brain for the entire weekend). To Glenn’s comments, I would only add that, in addition to a little blurb specifying the generic nature of the meta (“contest”) answer (like this week’s “famous 20th-century American”), the Friday WSJ also provides little clues suggesting what to look for. Often, the title of the puzzle gives a hint. Check for starred clues and oddly-worded ones. And the longest answers are often involved, so look for similarities and/or oddities in them. The best way to become familiar with the sorts of gimmicks used is to check out the answers, which are published at the beginning of the following week. I’ve been trying to do the metas for about a year now and I have improved to the point of getting about 2 out of every 3.

    @Carrie … I would have addressed your question about Clark Kent vs. Kal-El, but I didn’t want to reveal that I read comic books as a kid … ? (Actually, I’m more than a little surprised that I did: I had a rather fundamentalist Christian upbringing. For example, the first movie that I was allowed to see was “The Ten Commandments” and I was only allowed to see that as part of a church group that arranged a special showing for all of us little would-be angels … ? )

    @Glenn … I think that coffee, in moderation, offers some health benefits. Since my recent appendectomy, I have been able to drink coffee again, which I had not been able to do for 20 years because of a certain symptom it would cause. (I have asked three doctors to explain why the appendectomy made a difference, but they are as baffled by it as I am.) In any case, I’m enjoying immensely having a couple of cups a day and trying not to abuse the privilege.

  3. 39:00 no errors, but I needed about 15 of those minutes in the NE. What on earth is a TREX?? And why are museums full of TREXES?? Then I saw T REX and felt appropriately foolish. Sheesh. PUZZLE for “There’s one right in front of you” wins the prize today.
    Several missteps including thinking I was clever in getting “Popeye” for “Kings Feature Syndicate parent”..as Popeye was a parent in one of their comics. Hilarity ensued in that corner for a while. Second puzzle in recent memory to hinge on my getting KVETCH (I think there was a similar situation in a NYT puzzle a few weeks ago) in order for the rest of the dominoes to fall.

    Agree about “Bloodline”. Great series, but the state of Florida changed some sort of law that makes filming there prohibitively expensive (so they say), and Netflix has discontinued it. Sigh. They did end it in a manner so that, if desired, some other network could pick it up. We’ll see. Currently I’d recommend “Ozark” that just came out. It’s about a financial specialist dealing with drug cartels. Willie especially needs to see it as it takes place in Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. It brought back a lot of childhood memories of that area.

    @Glenn
    Just making a joke out of my own caffeine use and using your forgoing it as a vehicle. But you’re right, I have no health issues that would prevent me from consuming it, thankfully.

    @Dave
    Wild story about an appendectomy allowing you to drink coffee again. Never heard of such a thing, but enjoy. Now we just need to get you to go back to the occasional cigar…..Having dinner with a colleague tonight who just came back from visiting Cuba. Apparently I’m getting some Cubans from Cuba he brought me…..I only have a few cigars per year, but I enjoy each of them.

    @Carrie
    I guess that’s sort of subjective, but it isn’t a dramatic darkening at 65% ish. I was in high school for the last one, and I had a science teacher who was so worried about kids looking at the sun he denied knowing anything about it. “Don’t look at the sun. Ever!” was his mantra. We’ll see how dark it does or doesn’t get.

    Pardon my verbosity today…

    Best –

  4. My, my, you all had a lot to says today. Meta must be something in the digital puzzle that I don’t do. Sure I’d be bad at it anyway. Today’s puzzle was out of my range of “fun”, so I quit. Fri. was OK. Won’t be viewing the eclipse on Mon. as I failed to get the glasses needed. Saw an eclipse back in ’69 on Long Island where I was living, so I’m sure this will be the same. (See, you made me write more than I usually do too.)

  5. DNFed both the WSJ and Stumper (too much nonsense to get past). Also see nothing as to the meta, so I’m going to have to give that up. I just don’t have the ESP to do anything with a lot of that kind of stuff as some here do.

    @Dave
    There’s several movies and TV shows that could have gotten you out of the “comic book world”

    @Jeff
    It’s not so much health issues preventing use, it’s more health issues caused by use. I noticed a few, so I decided to quit.

    @kay kramer
    It’s a thing that certain puzzle providers do every once in a while. More specifically we were talking about the Friday WSJ, but others will do them too.

    Meanwhile, I have a direct drive to the direct epicenter of the solar eclipse. But still debating whether I want to fuss with it or not.

  6. I struggled with today’s puzzle (even though it was right in front of my face – harhar). Had to Google more than I’d like to admit.

    @David – Thanks for the advice on working the meta. It always sounded like fun but I didn’t know what y’all were referring to. Now that I worked one, thought I had a good answer, then read some of the comments, I feel like I definitely need more practice. And I’m sure my answer is probably wrong now that I’ve looked at a few past puzzles and their answers. Oh well, practice makes perfect. Or in the case of crosswords – faster and more thoughtful. ?

    Have a great weekend everyone!
    -Megan

    Ps. I live in an area where the eclipse will be well viewed but was bummed when I learned I would be out of town for it. Then I checked out the path and saw Spokane was probably an even better place to view it! Score!

  7. Okay … Today’s WSJ: 38:36, one (letter) in error, due to a personal near-Natick at the intersection of 13A and 16D. Today’s Newsday: 42:49, no errors, and the usual surreal progression from undoable to done. And I’m now about puzzled out for the week … (but tomorrow is another day … ? … ? )

  8. @ Carrie – Just to expand on the Superman birther question: As I remember the comic, Superboy came down to earth as a baby in a rocket launched from Kal-El and landed in the farmyard of Ma and Pa Kent, who were an older, childless couple. They were unaware of his super powers at the time, but decided he was a gift from heaven and they would adopt him. In order to make the story believable to their neighbors and others, they invented a birth story that he was theirs and had been born right there in Smallville. The rest is (Superboy) history.

  9. Took me an hour and a half but I got it without errors. Had a lot of problems in the middle where I had LeafTHROUGH, which messed things up for quite a while. I also insisted on Smelt before I remembered SCROD. Also had trouble in the NE where I finally put in PUZZLE and that got me HOPE, OHDEAR and ADZ.

    @Carrie I can only add to what everyone else wrote, that putting POB: Planet Krypton, would certainly raise a few eyebrows when Clark was looking to launch his journalism career.

  10. Hi gang!!! ?
    Thank you so much for the Superman info, everyone!! I never knew the basics. I could have googled it but I prefer the kindness of my fellow solvers. Maybe I will Google — I’m now curious as to whether we ever see ma and Pa Kent, among other things. Superman — very much a guy thing. I read “Archie” comics as a kid.

    Success on today’s puzzle!!! Yay! ? I worked it sporadically thru the day (my usual approach to Saturdays — or I’d never get them.) I was initially thrown by VIERA… it’s the only name that fit, but it didn’t sound right. Once again noticed how long answers on Saturday puzzles are often unexpectedly simple: e.g., WORK CLOTHES and LOOK THROUGH.

    DAVE! I may have mentioned this here before: when I had my appendix out, I somewhat lost my taste for rich foods. Just couldn’t eat as much. Lost 12 pounds!! (Kept it off for more than a decade, but then….Well….?) Had the same experience. I’d tell doctors that the appendectomy had changed my eating habits, and none could understand why.

    Y’all have got me meta-curious now, tho I’m kinda scared to try it. Kay, let me know how it goes if you try one!

    Be well~~™???

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