LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Aug 2017, Tuesday










Constructed by: Lonnie Burton & Nadine Anderton

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Spare Change

Each of today’s themed answers includes a string of circled letters. Those letters are the word SPARE with the letters CHANGED around:

  • 58A. Pocket coins, or what can literally be seen in each set of puzzle circles : SPARE CHANGE
  • 17A. Microsoft Excel tool : SPREADSHEET
  • 24A. Like lutes and mandolins : PEAR-SHAPED
  • 36A. Gentle hose setting : FINE SPRAY
  • 49A. Stain remover for wrinkle-resistant fabric : PERMA PRESS

Bill’s time: 5m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Pesto herb : BASIL

The term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as pesto sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, pesto from Genoa in northern Italy. I love, love pesto sauce …

11. NYC financial newspaper : WSJ

“The Wall Street Journal” (WSJ) is a daily newspaper with a business bent that is published in New York City by Dow Jones & Company. The WSJ has a larger US circulation than any other newspaper, with “USA Today” coming in a close second place.

14. Dodgers and Giants : TEAMS

The Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team were known as the Brooklyn Dodgers before the franchise moved to California. Before being called as the Dodgers, the team was known in Brooklyn as the Robins, the Superbas, the Trolley Dodgers, the Bridegrooms/Grooms, the Grays and the Atlantics.

Today’s San Francisco Giants baseball team was founded in 1883 as the New York Gothams. The team’s name was changed to the Giants in 1885, and the franchise moved to San Francisco in 1958.

15. Spanish girl : CHICA

In Spanish, a “niña” is a young girl, a child. The term “chica” applies to an older girl or perhaps a young woman.. The term “muchacha” applies to girls in general, I think …

17. Microsoft Excel tool : SPREADSHEET

Microsoft Excel is the spreadsheet program included in the Microsoft Office suite of applications. Microsoft’s first spreadsheet program was introduced back in 1982 and called Multiplan. Multiplan’s popularity waned due to the success of the competing product Lotus 1-2-3. Microsoft then introduced Excel, initially just for the Macintosh. When Excel was extended to Windows, Lotus was slow to respond and Microsoft took over the market.

19. It’s found in lodes : ORE

A lode is a metal ore deposit that’s found between two layers of rock or in a fissure. The “mother lode” is the principal deposit in a mine, usually of gold or silver. “Mother lode” is probably a translation of “veta madre”, an expression used in mining in Mexico.

23. Mount sacred to Judaism : ZION

Mount Zion is a hill in Jerusalem that his home to a number of important sites including King David’s Tomb, the Room of the Last Supper and the Chamber of the Holocaust. The Catholic cemetery on Mount Zion is also where Oskar Schindler was buried, the German national who saved over 1,000 Jews during the Holocaust.

24. Like lutes and mandolins : PEAR-SHAPED

The lute is a stringed instrument with a long neck and usually a pear-shaped body. It is held and played like a guitar, and was popular from the Middle Ages right through to the late Baroque era. A person who plays the lute can be referred to as a “lutenist”.

A mandolin is a stringed instrument in the lute family. There is also a mandola, a similar instrument that is a little larger. In fact, “mandolin” comes from the Italian for “little mandola”.

29. Beer drinker’s option, briefly : IPA

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

30. River from Lake Victoria : NILE

Lake Victoria is the largest lake by surface area on the continent of Africa. It was named by English explorer John Hanning Speke in honor of Queen Victoria of the UK. Speke was the first European to set eyes on the lake.

31. First animal rescue vessel? : ARK

The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah’s life-preserver during the flood.

32. Ex-Yankee Martinez : TINO

First baseman Tino Martinez has retired from Major League Baseball. Martinez played for a number of teams including the Mariners, Yankees, Cardinals and Devil Rays. Martinez was born and raised in Tampa, Florida and as a boy he worked in his father’s cigar factory.

34. John of Monty Python : CLEESE

The magnificent actor and comedian John Cleese came to the public’s attention as a cast member in the BBC’s comedy sketch show “Monty Python’s Flying Circus”. Cleese then co-wrote and starred in the outstanding comedy “Fawlty Towers”. He even had a role in two “James Bond” films.

41. New Mexico art hub : TAOS

The town of Taos, New Mexico is named for the Native American village nearby called Taos Pueblo. Taos is famous for its art colony. Artists began to settle in Taos in 1899, and the Taos Society of Artists was founded in 1915.

42. Chicken __: itchy malady : POX

Chicken pox is a viral infection, a classic disease of childhood most commonly caught by 4-10 year olds. There is a complication that can arise later in life as the virus sometimes reactivates to cause shingles.

47. Yankee manager Joe with four World Series wins : TORRE

As a manager, Joe Torre was part of four World Series wins, all of them with the New York Yankees baseball team. Torre is an Italian American who was born in Brooklyn, New York. During the run up (pun intended!) to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Torre carried the Olympic flame part of the way through Florence in Italy, handing it over to the next runner at the famous Ponte Vecchio. I’d guess that was quite a thrill for him …

49. Stain remover for wrinkle-resistant fabric : PERMA PRESS

Perma Press is a laundry product, a stain-removing spray designed to work effectively on permanent-press and wrinkle-free fabrics in particular.

62. Animation frame : CEL

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

63. Prohibit, legally : ESTOP

The term “estop” means to block or stop by using some legal device. The word “estop” comes from Old French, in which “estopper” means “to stop up” or “to impede”.

65. Masthead VIPs : EDS

The masthead is a list often found on the editorial page of a newspaper that gives the members of a newspaper’s editorial board.

67. Actress Streep : MERYL

Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an Academy Award than any other actor, a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mamma Mia!” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

Down

1. 42nd and Wall: Abbr. : STS

42nd Street is a major thoroughfare in Manhattan that is home to many of New York’s theaters, particularly around Times Square, where 42nd Street intersects with Broadway. It’s the association with the theater district that led to the naming of 1932 novel and 1933 film “42nd Street”, which follows the staging of a Broadway musical. That same intersection of 42nd Street with Broadway was the eastern terminus for the famed Lincoln Highway that crossed the continent, terminating on the West Coast at Lincoln Park in San Francisco.

3. Dinghy attachment : OARLOCK

Oarlocks are swivelling braces on the sides of a rowing boat that hold the oars as the boat is being propelled. Back in Ireland, we call them “rowlocks” (pronounced “rollox”).

Our word “dinghy” comes from the Hindi “dingi”, the word for a small boat.

5. J.D.-to-be’s exam : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

The law degree abbreviated to “J.D.” is more fully known as “Juris Doctor”.

6. Former NCAA football ranking sys. : BCS

The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) was the ranking system used to match up the top ten ranked NCAA football teams for five bowl games. The BCS was abandoned in 2014 with the introduction of the College Football Playoff tournament.

8. Mountain chain : SIERRA

“Sierra” is Spanish for “mountain range”. The term also translates as “saw”, and so can particularly describe a jagged mountain range.

9. Fruity frozen drinks : ICEES

Slush Puppie and ICEE are brands of frozen, slushy drinks. Ostensibly competing brands, ICEE company now owns the Slush Puppie brand.

11. __ pie: cream-filled chocolate cake : WHOOPIE

A whoopie pie is sometimes referred to as a “BFO”, standing for Big Fat Oreo. The latter term is quite descriptive as a whoopie pie is made from two mound-shaped pieces of chocolate cake placed above and below a white creamy filling. There is some evidence that the confection originated in the with the Pennsylvania Amish. Apparently, when farmers found the pie in their lunch bags they shouted “whoopie!”, hence the name.

12. Reddish-brown horses : SORRELS

The sorrel color of horse is a copper-red, although the term is often used these days to describe any horse with chestnut coloring.

13. “Peppermint Twist” lead singer : JOEY DEE

Joey Dee and the Starliters (sometimes “starlighters”) are a pop music group best known for the 1961 hit “Peppermint Twist”.

18. ATM transaction: Abbr. : DEP

Deposit (dep.)

22. Dred Scott decision Chief Justice : TANEY

Roger B. Taney was Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1836 until 1864 (when he passed away). Taney’s most notable decision was in the case of Dred Scott v. Sandford, in which he delivered the majority opinion that African Americans could not be considered citizens of the US. Taney was the second-longest serving Chief Justice (Chief Justice John Marshall served for 34 years, from 1801 to 1835).

The landmark case of Dred Scott vs. Sandford came before the US Supreme Court in 1857. Scott had been born a slave, but lived with his owner in a free state for several years before returning to the slave state of Missouri. Scott’s argument was that living in a free state entitled him to emancipation. A divided US Supreme Court sided with Scott’s owner John Sandford. The decision was that no African American, free or enslaved, was entitled to US citizenship and therefore Scott was unable to petition the court for his freedom. The decision heightened tensions between the North and South, and the American Civil War erupted just three years later.

23. When doubled, a Gabor : ZSA

Zsa Zsa Gabor was a Hungarian American actress, born in Budapest as Sári Gábor (the older sister of the actress Eva). Zsa Zsa Gabor was married a whopping nine times, including a 5-year stint with Conrad Hilton and another 5 years with the actor George Sanders. One of Gabor’s famous quips was that she was always a good housekeeper, as after every divorce she kept the house!

25. German article : EINE

“Eine” is the German indefinite article used with feminine nouns.

33. Suffix with chlor- : -INE

Chlorine is a yellow-green gas that is very poisonous at high concentrations. As such, chlorine gas was used in WWI, earning the shameful title of the world’s first gaseous chemical weapon. Chlorine was mistakenly believed to be an oxide for many years, until English chemist Sir Humphry Davy correctly concluded that the gas was an element. Davy coined the name “chlorine”, from the Greek “chloros” meaning “”green-yellow”.

34. Zagreb’s country, to the IOC : CRO

The Republic of Croatia is a Balkan country. The Croats declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Croatia became a member of NATO in 2009, and a member of the European Union in 2013.

Zagreb is the capital city of the European Republic of Croatia. Zagreb has been around a long, long time, and dates back to the diocese of Zagreb that was founded at the end of 11th century.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

36. Terra __: solid land : FIRMA

“Terra firma” is Latin for “solid ground”.

40. FedEx deliveries : PARCELS

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it’s more catchy, abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its “SuperHub” at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world’s largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

43. Like a bad fake tan : ORANGEY

The most effective fake tans available today are not dyes or stains. Instead, they are sprays with the tactive ingredient dihydroxyacetone (DHA). DHA reacts chemically with amino acids in the dead layer of skin on the surface of the body. Sounds a little risky to me …

44. Gen-__: millennial preceder : XER

The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

The Millennial Generation are sometimes referred to as “Generation Y” (Gen-Y). Millennials were born after the “Gen-Xers”, from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

46. Fake : ERSATZ

Something described as ersatz is a copy, and usually not a good one. “Ersatz” comes from the German verb “ersetzen” meaning “to replace”.

50. Church recesses : APSES

The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

51. Cola choice : PEPSI

The Pepsi-Cola formulation was developed by one Caleb Bradham who made the drink at home and sold it as “Brad’s Drink”. Bradham’s aim was to provide a drink that was pleasant to taste, that would aid digestion and boost energy. Included in the formula were pepsin (a digestive enzyme) and kola nuts. These two ingredients inspired the brand name we use today: Pepsi-Cola.

60. Mini-albums, for short : EPS

An extended-play record, CD or download (EP) contains more music than a single, but less than an LP.

61. Subj. for immigrants : ESL

English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Ruin : SPOIL

6. Pesto herb : BASIL

11. NYC financial newspaper : WSJ

14. Dodgers and Giants : TEAMS

15. Spanish girl : CHICA

16. Boo follower : -HOO

17. Microsoft Excel tool : SPREADSHEET

19. It’s found in lodes : ORE

20. Disc in the dishwasher : PLATE

21. Parish residence : RECTORY

23. Mount sacred to Judaism : ZION

24. Like lutes and mandolins : PEAR-SHAPED

27. Splinter groups : SECTS

29. Beer drinker’s option, briefly: IPA

30. River from Lake Victoria : NILE

31. First animal rescue vessel? : ARK

32. Ex-Yankee Martinez : TINO

34. John of Monty Python : CLEESE

36. Gentle hose setting : FINE SPRAY

38. Shoot for, with “to” : ASPIRE

41. New Mexico art hub : TAOS

42. Chicken __: itchy malady : POX

45. Paper mishap : TEAR

46. Building wing : ELL

47. Yankee manager Joe with four World Series wins : TORRE

49. Stain remover for wrinkle-resistant fabric : PERMA PRESS

53. Close by : NEAR

54. Gets away : ESCAPES

55. When many take coffee breaks : AT TEN

57. “__ you listening?” : ARE

58. Pocket coins, or what can literally be seen in each set of puzzle circles : SPARE CHANGE

62. Animation frame : CEL

63. Prohibit, legally : ESTOP

64. Fencing swords : EPEES

65. Masthead VIPs : EDS

66. Small and large : SIZES

67. Actress Streep : MERYL

Down

1. 42nd and Wall: Abbr. : STS

2. More lively : PEPPIER

3. Dinghy attachment : OARLOCK

4. “That is to say … ” : I MEANT …

5. J.D.-to-be’s exam : LSAT

6. Former NCAA football ranking sys. : BCS

7. Spa sigh : AHH

8. Mountain chain : SIERRA

9. Fruity frozen drinks : ICEES

10. Fastening device : LATCH

11. __ pie: cream-filled chocolate cake : WHOOPIE

12. Reddish-brown horses : SORRELS

13. “Peppermint Twist” lead singer : JOEY DEE

18. ATM transaction: Abbr. : DEP

22. Dred Scott decision Chief Justice : TANEY

23. When doubled, a Gabor : ZSA

25. German article : EINE

26. Biblical disciple : APOSTLE

28. Verb in a recipe : STIR

33. Suffix with chlor- : -INE

34. Zagreb’s country, to the IOC : CRO

35. Bringing up the rear : LAST

36. Terra __: solid land : FIRMA

37. Friends : PALS

38. Content (with) : AT PEACE

39. Becomes incensed : SEES RED

40. FedEx deliveries : PARCELS

42. Feather-fixing bird, e.g. : PREENER

43. Like a bad fake tan : ORANGEY

44. Gen-__: millennial preceder : XER

46. Fake : ERSATZ

48. Already recorded : ON TAPE

50. Church recesses : APSES

51. Cola choice : PEPSI

52. Anatomical pouch : SAC

56. Those folks : THEM

59. Fish eggs : ROE

60. Mini-albums, for short : EPS

61. Subj. for immigrants : ESL

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8 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Aug 2017, Tuesday”

  1. I had an easy time, and actually looked for the theme – now what sort of
    ‘change’ ? I looked for pennies, nickels and dimes ( and other more ancient coins …? ) …. maybe I should have thought more literally ….

    I knew of sorrel as a spice ( I am obsessed with spices – that is how indian I am – ! ) … and it is a spice of a form of the leaves of a particular variety of a Hibiscus plant. The leaves, and the fruit-like calyx, which is bright red, is a popular souring agent, in S E Asia, and is bright red, to boot. So, the fruit can also be used as an organic red food coloring agent, even in Germany. The bad news is that the sour taste is not due to citric, maleic or ascorbic ( Vitamin C ) acids but due to oxalic acid, which can be quite toxic, especially to the kidneys and gout ( calcium oxalates etc., ) etc., and could lead to renal failure, if eaten, in large quantities …. like rhubarb leaves.
    But now I know that sorrel is also a copper red brown color of horse.

    Estoppel, a common enough term in law, is based on the principle, that if you don’t enforce your rights, …. you will lose them. If you allow your neighbor to say, build a hut in your back yard, after a good degree of time has passed, ( say, five years – ) , you cannot use the law to evict him … he can estop you from evicting him. You have to enforce your rights in a timely fashion.

    Have a nice day all.

  2. It took me a while to click into this puzzle, but made it to the finish. Jeff: Let us know the status of your property when you return to Houston. It’s just an awful situation and will go on for a long and costly cleanup. Good Luck!

  3. No crosswords today. I’ve been in contact with someone who is near my street. They say a friend in a boat went by the street and by their estimates there is about 2-4 feet of water in my house – every house on my street in fact. Essentially, aside from what I’m carrying in one suitcase and my computer bag, almost everything I own has been destroyed…almost. I’m assuming everything on the 2nd floor is ok.

    BUT – the good news is I’m safe and sound at a nice resort in Las Vegas waiting it all out. It certainly beats waiting on a rooftop waiting to be rescued. After speaking with my insurance company (USAA – there’s a plug) and a slew of other similar related calls, I’ve found out I”m covered 100% for everything they’ll have to repair as well as all contents of the house. They even cover my lodging and expenses in the meantime. Additionally – my car is sitting on the 7th floor of the parking garage at Bush Intercontinental Airport so it’s about as safe as anything in the city….whenever I can get to it.

    It will take several months for all these repairs to be done. Meanwhile, I’ll be out west and managing the rebuilding process from here – going back and forth like a yo-yo.

    Overall, I consider myself one of the lucky ones. Thank you all for your thoughts.

    Best –

  4. Hiya folks! ? (That’s a hibiscus!)
    Jeff, so glad to hear what is comparatively good news. As I said yesterday– I’m glad you weren’t there for the worst of it– and of course there’s more to come. ?
    It’s so inspiring to see all the volunteers out helping to rescue people, across the whole affected area. People with water crafts going door to door.
    Easy puzzle, tho I thought that the scrambled word would be SPEAR!! ? I always thought PERMA PRESS was a fabric. Wonder how well it works? Must find on Amazon.
    Dave, agree about AAH/AHH! I always have to write A_H til I get the cross. !!!
    Be well~~™?

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