LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Aug 2017, Friday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Breaking News

Today’s themed answers sound like common phrases with an “a” sound changed to a short “o” sound:

  • 17A. Why St. Peter owns darning needles? : FOR HEAVEN’S SOCKS (from “for heaven’s sakes”)
  • 31A. Museum of Home Security exhibits? : THE GREAT LOCKS (from “the Great Lakes”)
  • 37A. What a shepherd sees after a snowstorm? : FROSTED FLOCKS (from “Frosted Flakes”)
  • 57A. Consumer reactions to big price hikes for brownies? : CHOCOLATE SHOCKS (from “chocolate shakes”)

Bill’s time: 14m 51s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Verne voyager : NEMO

In the 1954 movie version of “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”, Captain Nemo goes down with his ship. In the novel by Jules Verne the fate of Nemo and his crew isn’t quite so cut and dry, although the inference is perhaps that they did indeed head for Davy Jones’ Locker.

Jules Verne really was a groundbreaking author. Verne pioneered the science fiction genre, writing about space, air and underwater travel, long before they were practical and proved feasible. Verne is the second-most translated author of all time, with only Agatha Christie beating him out.

10. Campus hangout : QUAD

A university often features a central quadrangle (quad).

14. “Things are never quite as scary when you’ve got __ friend”: Bill Watterson : A BEST

Cartoonist Bill Watterson is best known for the widely syndicated comic strip “Calvin and Hobbes”. He drew that strip from 1985 until 1995, at which point Watterston effectively withdrew into private life. He now values his privacy, and spends a lot of time painting.

15. Old Roman poet : OVID

The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil. Although he was immensely popular during his own lifetime, he spent the last ten years of his life in exile. He fell foul of Emperor Augustus, although what led to this disfavor isn’t truly understood.

16. “Once more __ the breach”: Shak. : UNTO

Shakespeare’s play “Henry V” is more correctly called “The Life of Henry the Fifth”. The story mainly focuses on his life before and immediately after the king’s celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Agincourt. “Henry V” includes one of Shakespeare’s most celebrated speeches, an address by the king to his troops at the siege of Harfleur, with the opening lines:

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead …

17. Why St. Peter owns darning needles? : FOR HEAVEN’S SOCKS (from “for heaven’s sakes”)

In the Christian tradition, Saint Peter is often depicted as the keeper of the gates of heaven. This depiction arises from a passage in the Gospel of Matthew:

I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hell will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.

20. Actor Idris __ : ELBA

The English actor Idris Elba is probably best known in North America for playing the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally works as a disk jockey using the name DJ Big Driis.

22. Naturally lit indoor spaces : ATRIA

In modern architecture an atrium (plural “atria” or “atriums”) is a large open space usually in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

23. CV inclusion : BIO

A curriculum vitae (CV) is a listing of someone’s work experience and qualifications, and is used mainly in making a job application. The term “curriculum vitae” can be translated from Latin as “course of life”.

26. “Ah, Wilderness!” mother : ESSIE

“Ah, Wilderness!” is a comedy play by Eugene O’Neill that was first stage in 1933, on Broadway. “Ah, Wilderness!” was adapted into the musical film called “Summer Holiday” that was released in 1948.

28. Future D.A.’s hurdle : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

30. Fresno-to-L.A. dir. : SSE

Fresno is the largest inland city in the state of California. The city was named for the many ash trees that lined the San Joaquin River, as “fresno” is the Spanish for “ash tree”.

The California city of Los Angeles (L.A.) is the second most populous city in the country, after New York. L.A. was established in 1781 as a pueblo named “El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula”, which translates as “The Town of Our Lady the Queen of Angels of the Porciúncula River”. This name evolved into “Los Angeles”, and the Porciúncula River is now called the Los Angeles River.

31. Museum of Home Security exhibits? : THE GREAT LOCKS (from “the Great Lakes”)

A well-known mnemonic for remembering the names of the Great Lakes is HOMES: standing for Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie and Superior.

35. Peanut product : OIL

I have to say it, but it drives me crazy. Peanuts aren’t nuts, they’re legumes, a plant in the bean and pea family. The flowers of the peanut plant last only one day and then wither. The fertilized ovary develops an elongated “peg” that grows downwards, pushing the ovary down into the soil. The ovary develops underground into a mature peanut pod containing between one and four seeds, which we call “nuts”. But they aren’t nuts. Did I say that already …?

36. Fraser or Douglas : FIR

The Fraser fir is a species of fir tree that is related to the balsam fir. The tree was named for Scottish botanist John Fraser. The Fraser fir is a popular Christmas tree, and has been used as the official tree in the White House more than any other variety of tree.

Various species of Douglas fir are native to North and Central America, and to Asia. The tree gets its name from the Scottish botanist David Douglas, who introduced the species into Europe.

37. What a shepherd sees after a snowstorm? : FROSTED FLOCKS (from “Frosted Flakes”)

Tony the Tiger has been the mascot of Frosted Flakes cereal since the product’s introduction in 1951. As Tony would say, “They’re Gr-r-reat!” Well, I thought they were when I was a lot younger …

46. Sol preceder : AERO-

Strictly speaking, the term “aerosol” defines a suspension of either liquid droplets or solid particles in a gas. A good example of an aerosol is smoke. We tend to use the “aerosol” to describe what comes out of a spray can, even though the liquid droplets usually fall out of the gas and don’t stay suspended.

48. Frigga portrayer in “Thor” : RUSSO

The lovely and very talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to highschool (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting. I am so glad she did, as Rene Russo is one of my favorite actresses …

The 2011 movie “Thor” is yet another film based on a comic book hero. Even though I won’t be seeing it (I don’t do comics), I must admit it does have an impressive cast. Chris Hemsworth plays Thor, supported by Natalie Portman, Rene Russo and Anthony Hopkins. And to crown it all, Kenneth Branagh is the director.

54. Perfumer’s ingredient : ATTAR

Attar is a fragrant essential oil obtained from flowers, and the term often particularly refers to attar of roses.

55. Red-coated security force: Abbr. : RCMP

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Mounties, RCMP) is an unusual police force in that it provides all policing for the whole country. The RCMP works on the national level, and right down to the municipal level. The force’s distinctive uniform of red serge tunic, blue pants with a yellow stripe, stetson hat etc. is known internally as “Review Order”. The red uniform dates back to the days of the North-West Mounted Police, which was one of the existing forces that were merged in 1920 to form the RCMP.

57. Consumer reactions to big price hikes for brownies? : CHOCOLATE SHOCKS (from “chocolate shakes”)

Apparently the first brownies were created for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The recipe was developed by a pastry chef at the city’s Palmer House Hotel. The idea was to produce a cake-like dessert that was small enough and dainty enough to be eaten by ladies as part of a boxed lunch.

61. O or Jay : ALER

The Baltimore Orioles are one of the eight charter teams of MLB’s American League, so the franchise dates back to 1901. Prior to 1901, the team has roots in the Minor League Milwaukee Brewers, and indeed entered the American League as the Brewers. In 1902 the Brewers moved to St. Louis and became the Browns. The team didn’t fare well in St. Louis, so when it finally relocated to Baltimore in the early fifties the team changed its name completely, to the Baltimore Orioles. The owners so badly wanted a fresh start that they traded 17 old Browns players with the New York Yankees. The trade didn’t help the team’s performance on the field in those early days, but it did help distance the new team from its past.

The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

62. Author Calvino : ITALO

As well as being an author, Italo Calvino was a famous Italian journalist. He was a supporter of communism and so wasn’t very popular in the US nor in Britain.

63. Coastal raptors : ERNS

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also called the white-tailed eagle, or the sea-eagle.

“Raptor” is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

64. Cutlass, e.g. : OLDS

Oldsmobile made the Cutlass Ciera from 1982 to 1996. The Ciera was the brand name’s most successful model.

65. City on the Ruhr : ESSEN

Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany.

Down

4. Org. concerned with ladder safety : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

5. GPS datum : RTE

A global positioning system (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

6. “An ill-defined and disreputable literary banana republic”: Stephen King : NOVELLA

Stephen King referred to the novella as “an ill-defined and disreputable literary banana republic” in the afterword to his work “Different Seasons”. Said work is a collection of four of King’s own novellas.

7. High point of Hillary’s career : EVEREST

Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

9. “__ bodkins!”: old oath : ODS

“Odds bodkins!” (sometimes “ods bodkins!”) is a minced oath, a euphemistic version of “God’s body!”.

10. “The Raven” verb : QUOTH

“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

12. Diet doctor : ATKINS

The eating of relatively few carbohydrates is central to the diet proposed by Robert Atkins. Atkins first laid out the principles behind the Atkins diet in a research paper published in 1958 in the “Journal of the American Medical Association”. He popularized his diet starting in 1972 with his book “Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution”.

24. Dental procedure, for short : PERIO

Periodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with the gums and the tissue supporting a tooth. The word “periodontal” was coined in the mid-19th century. The term comes from the Greek for “around the tooth”.

27. Composer Stravinsky : IGOR

The composer Igor Stravinsky’s most famous works were completed relatively early in his career, when he was quite young. His three ballets “The Firebird”, “Petrushka” and “The Rite of Spring” were published in 1910-1913, when Stravinsky was in his early thirties.

29. Devonshire dandy : TOFF

A toff is a well-dressed gentleman of the upper class.

Devon (formerly “Devonshire”) is a county in the southwest of England. The county town of Devon is Exeter, and the largest city in the county is Plymouth, the port from which the Mayflower Pilgrims departed.

32. “Born Free” lioness : ELSA

The life story of Elsa the lion was told by game warden Joy Adamson, who had a very close relationship with the lioness from when Elsa was orphaned as a young cub. Adamson wrote the book “Born Free” about Elsa, and then “Living Free” which tells the story of Elsa and her three lion cubs. In the 1966 film based on “Born Free”, Adamson is played by the talented actress Virginia McKenna.

33. Paramecium movers : CILIA

A “paramecium” is a single-celled organism that moves around in water using the tightly-spaced cilia that surrounds its body.

34. McDonald’s founder : KROC

The original McDonald’s restaurant was opened in 1940 by Richard and Maurice McDonald as a barbecue restaurant. The brothers then moved into fast food hamburgers, eventually selling out to one of their franchise agents, Ray Kroc. It was Ray Kroc who really led the company to its worldwide success. He was played by Michael Keaton in the movie about Ray Kroc’s business life called “The Founder”.

38. Controversial political cartoonist : TED RALL

Ted Rall is a political cartoonist whose cartoons are syndicated in many newspapers across North America. Several of Rall’s cartoons have created a lot of controversy.

40. Projecting architectural features : DORMERS

A dormer window is a window in a dormer! A dormer is a roofed structure that protrudes from the slope of the main roof.

41. Capital NE of Bogotá : CARACAS

Caracas is the capital of Venezuela, and is located in the north of the country. The original settlement of Caracas was named by the Spanish using the name of a local indigenous tribe.

Bogotá is the capital city of Colombia. Noted for having many libraries and universities, Bogotá is sometimes referred to as “The Athens of South America”.

43. Big hat : STETSON

Stetson is a brand name of hat, manufactured by the John B. Stetson Company of St. Joseph, Missouri. The so called “cowboy hat” that Stetson pioneered was such a success that the company became the largest hat maker in the world, producing over 3.3 million hats per year.

44. Ancient prophet : ORACLE

In Ancient Greece and Rome, an oracle was someone believed inspired by the gods to give wise counsel. The word “oracle” derives from the Latin “orare” meaning “to speak”, which is the same root for our word “orator”.

45. Comics villain since 1940 : LUTHOR

Lex Luthor is the arch-nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

49. Gives the heave-ho : SACKS

The term “to sack” meaning to dismiss someone from a job, used to be phrased as “to give the sack”. The expression probably came from the idea of firing a worker and sending him or her off with tools in a sack.

50. Conquistador’s treasure : ORO

In Spanish, “oro” (gold) is a “metal precioso” (precious metal).

“Conquistador” is the Spanish for “conqueror”.

52. Speed meas. : MPS

Miles per second (mps), perhaps.

56. “Chopped” array : POTS

In the world of poker, a pot might be “chopped”, split among two or more players.

58. Southeast Asian tongue : LAO

Lao is the official language of Laos. Lao is also spoken in the northeast of Thailand, but there the language is known as Isan.

59. Move it, quaintly : HIE

“To hie” is to move quickly, to bolt.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Enjoy deeply : SAVOR

6. Verne voyager : NEMO

10. Campus hangout : QUAD

14. “Things are never quite as scary when you’ve got __ friend”: Bill Watterson : A BEST

15. Old Roman poet : OVID

16. “Once more __ the breach”: Shak. : UNTO

17. Why St. Peter owns darning needles? : FOR HEAVEN’S SOCKS (from “for heaven’s sakes”)

20. Actor Idris __ : ELBA

21. “Take this” : HERE

22. Naturally lit indoor spaces : ATRIA

23. CV inclusion : BIO

24. Not as good-looking? : PALER

25. Minimalist beachwear : THONG

26. “Ah, Wilderness!” mother : ESSIE

28. Future D.A.’s hurdle : LSAT

30. Fresno-to-L.A. dir. : SSE

31. Museum of Home Security exhibits? : THE GREAT LOCKS (from “the Great Lakes”)

35. Peanut product : OIL

36. Fraser or Douglas : FIR

37. What a shepherd sees after a snowstorm? : FROSTED FLOCKS (from “Frosted Flakes”)

44. Appreciative cry : OLE!

46. Sol preceder : AERO-

47. “Not possible” : I CAN’T

48. Frigga portrayer in “Thor” : RUSSO

51. Prefix in makeup product names : DERMA-

53. Feel sorry about : RUE

54. Perfumer’s ingredient : ATTAR

55. Red-coated security force: Abbr. : RCMP

56. Diplomacy result : PACT

57. Consumer reactions to big price hikes for brownies? : CHOCOLATE SHOCKS (from “chocolate shakes”)

60. Pointer’s cry : LOOK!

61. O or Jay : ALER

62. Author Calvino : ITALO

63. Coastal raptors : ERNS

64. Cutlass, e.g. : OLDS

65. City on the Ruhr : ESSEN

Down

1. It’s in the bag : SAFE BET

2. Void : ABOLISH

3. Like a motormouth : VERBOSE

4. Org. concerned with ladder safety : OSHA

5. GPS datum : RTE

6. “An ill-defined and disreputable literary banana republic”: Stephen King : NOVELLA

7. High point of Hillary’s career : EVEREST

8. __ spring : MINERAL

9. “__ bodkins!”: old oath : ODS

10. “The Raven” verb : QUOTH

11. Straighten, as one’s legs : UNCROSS

12. Diet doctor : ATKINS

13. Pharmacist’s concern : DOSAGE

18. “Now it’s clear!” : AHA!

19. Didn’t rise : SAT

24. Dental procedure, for short : PERIO

27. Composer Stravinsky : IGOR

29. Devonshire dandy : TOFF

32. “Born Free” lioness : ELSA

33. Paramecium movers : CILIA

34. McDonald’s founder : KROC

37. Bit of suspended decoration : FESTOON

38. Controversial political cartoonist : TED RALL

39. Put up : ERECTED

40. Projecting architectural features : DORMERS

41. Capital NE of Bogotá : CARACAS

42. Get to work, with “down” : KNUCKLE

43. Big hat : STETSON

44. Ancient prophet : ORACLE

45. Comics villain since 1940 : LUTHOR

49. Gives the heave-ho : SACKS

50. Conquistador’s treasure : ORO

52. Speed meas. : MPS

56. “Chopped” array : POTS

58. Southeast Asian tongue : LAO

59. Move it, quaintly : HIE

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17 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Aug 2017, Friday”

  1. Hi everyone! I have enjoyed reading this blog and all of your comments for some time now but have never commented. You are an interesting group and I like the camaraderie y’all have.

    Regarding yesterday’s puzzle, I’m surprised no one commented on the use of circles. (I like the snarky comments some make).

    Regarding today’s puzzle, I thought “Chopped” was referring to the cooking show on Food Network in which there are also a lot of POTS used by the chefs. 🙂

    Hope everyone has a great day!

    -Megan

  2. Chopped pots are not that common in poker. Also, an array of (poker) pots really doesn’t make sense. I think that the cooking show reference is much more apt.

  3. Welcome, Meghan ….. now Carrie has some company in her gender. ( Where, oh where has Pookie gone ???)

    Meghan, we are a friendly group and we welcome all comments. Even those not about the crosswords, and many about crosswords in other newspapers and forums. While some of us are apparently dedicated experts and connoisseurs, some of us are just bit players ( ummm, that would be me …. ) and we read Bill’s notes intensely, with an aim to find out his factual errors, and generally, spelling mistakes …. each such misteak (!) and/ or error will earn you ….. Bill’s eternal gratitude ….

    Please continue to post !!

  4. 14:15, no errors. I made quite a few missteps on this one, but finally stumbled over the finish line and fell to the ground, panting.

    I have an answer for the WSJ meta, but I’m not entirely happy with it: it doesn’t have that clicked-smoothly-into-place feeling …

    1. I’m impressed that you have any sort of meta answer for the WSJ, smooth or not. I haven’t even got a WAG for the meta today. I went through all the teams and came up with a perfectly blank mind (tabula rasa being my normal state when contemplating the meta).

      But I will say that both grids today, LAT’s and WSJ, were much easier than Friday normally demands.

  5. 24:31 sin errores, but a fun theme and puzzle from Mr. Wechsler. I liked the misdirection on Hillary. The last to fall for me was POTS. I just couldn’t think of any letter other than “T” there so I tried it and got the success banner. I don’t know if that’s cheating or not, but it worked. If it hadn’t, I’d have kept trying letters until I had no errors….

    Megan – Welcome to the blog. I usually gripe about the circles because they don’t show up on the mensa site I use to do these. But yes – it’s definitely conspiratorial.

    @Vidwan
    I believe neutrinos travel nearly the speed of light. In order to exceed the speed of light a neutrino (or anything) would need infinite energy, in theory. Some have speculated that they travel at the speed of light, but I believe that has been disproven as well.

    If you’re (or anyone is) interested in this subject, a brilliant (IMVHO) theoretical physicist by the name of Matt Strassler does a wonderful blog on these subjects (www.profmattstrassler.com ). I’ve spent hours on that site for a variety of reasons. I tend to feel more comfortable with the math portion of things, but the majority of his articles are written for non scientists who just want to know about the subject of theoretical physics. You can even post questions and have him answer them. Some extremely accomplished people visit that blog. It’s quite impressive.

    Best –

  6. So basically, the clue Wechsler wrote about Ray KROC was a lie–he didn’t “found” it.

    And of course, who can forget Dr. Atkins and his silly diet. How many of these crocks die from their own diets? Atkins had a heart attack and bounced his head off a NY street curb. Probably not such a great idea to cram your body full of unsaturated fat all those years. And the dude in the 70s with the running fad–yep, he died (you guessed it) while running.

    Bill, thanks for the Stringer Bell reference. “The Wire” was the greatest TV series ever made.

    1. @Willie –
      Ditto on The Wire. I just watched it all a couple of months ago, and I’m still having withdrawals. I hear watching it a second time you see a lot you missed the first time. I may try that someday.

      best –

  7. Jeff, thanks for the site – I will check it out – although I’m not the scientific type – especially where involved abstract math is concerned. I’ve never been able to understand the basic concept on how mere math can actually predict particles and conjectures – I’m sure there is solid logic involved, but the concept entirely escapes me.

    The puzzle was very challenging, and the constructor’s name was even more daunting, I must confess. The ‘pots’ clue, I had read in Meghan’s post, so I definitely cheated ( even more than usual – ). I must confess the clue is really very difficult.

    The Great Locks – I can’t understand – checked-in luggage by air, is not supposed to be locked in the US – is that the clue to the answer ? I once travelled from Mumbai, to Cleveland, via Newark, Liberty – about 10 years ago – and checked-in luggage, mostly, around the world, is x-rayed in front of you, and then supposed to be, relocked, for security of your belongings. However at Newark, the TSA didn’t believe or trust the ‘other countries security’ and broke open my suitcase, for no reason, than to prove a point …. it should have to be unlocked.

    I thought Paramecium was yet another trans-uranic element …..

    Fwiw, Bill Watterson used to stay in my zip code district, and his father was a councilman in a nearby suburb city. He is the most intelluctual cartoonist that I have read, I think. His collected works are always worth re-reading.
    In one cartoon, Calvin calls up the local librarian, and tells her that he heard of a ‘bad word’, but he can’t remember it …. so could the librarian, please go through the entire list of bad words, until he can recollect the one that he had actually heard ?

    Have a nice day, all.

  8. Yes, welcome to the “club” Megan. Guess that makes three females as far as we know. I got stuck in the southwest corner. Just couldn’t come up with 57A. Oh, well, the rest of the week wasn’t too bad to me. Have a nice weekend everyone!

  9. @Vidwan –
    I believe the clue is “Museum of home security exhibits”. That’s “home” not “homeland”. In other words such a museum would have exhibits of really nice locks that secure (..or lock up) homes as in houses and house locks

    Best –

  10. Howdy, Megan! To me, anyone who says “y’all” is a good addition to any group?.
    I’m not an everyday commenter here, but I know you’ll find the regulars interesting and well-informed (and they’re always civil and courteous). You’re sure to learn a lot from Bill’s summaries, too.
    Jeffrey Wechsler’s puzzle is typically challenging, but some of the clues and answers were a little beyond me. For example, I’ve played a lot of poker, and never heard of a chopped pot. I’ve never heard a dandy or a fop referred to as a toff, either. And I could name half a dozen political cartoonists off the top of my head, but Ted Rall is a new one on me. The Hillary clue was a gem, though, and the overall theme was clever enough for a Friday.
    So much for my feeble (and 3-down … sorry) opinion. Happy weekend, all.

  11. DNF on this about half way through. I concur wtih the others about “Chopped”. It’s a reality cooking show (back to all that culture stuff I don’t know and won’t know enough to solve these in a few years, case in point several of the clues here).

    @Megan
    Welcome here! We all have our different goals and reasons, but as for me I’m definitely not much of an expert on anything crosswords. That gets proven again and again every time I do something with crosswords. A bit of connoisseur maybe on the things I know, but if you have questions you can always ask. Anyhow, hope to hear from you much more on here!

  12. Hiya folks!
    Welcome, Megan!! ?
    Agree with Megan, Nolanski, and Anon: the Chopped clue must refer to the cooking show.
    Tough Friday Wechsler today! Got most of it, but had to Google for ORACLE, and had a W instead of R…. forgot about the RCMP.
    And what’s with that ALER clue??! I filled it in correctly, but I didn’t get it — who calls an Oriole an O??? I’ve never heard that. I’m rather put out by that clue, being a baseball gal. ⚾
    Hey Willie, Jim Fixx! — the runner. I remember that.
    So, Glenn: we here have reasons and goals?? Wow! Now I need to figure out what mine are….?
    Be well~~™?

    1. @Carrie
      The Orioles and Blue Jays are both in the American League making them AL’ers (American Leaguers). Baseball is usually one subject in these crosswords I have no problem with. 🙂

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