LA Times Crossword 15 Jul 19, Monday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Gary Larson
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Cold Front

Themed answers each have a COLD FRONT (start):

  • 56A Harbinger of lower temperatures, and a hint to the answers to starred clues : COLD FRONT
  • 16A *Metaphorical tablet for the overly nervous : CHILL PILL
  • 37A *Flattering deception : SNOW JOB
  • 10D *2005 Disney figure-skating film : ICE PRINCESS
  • 24D *Stop-action effect : FREEZE-FRAME

Bill’s time: 5m 36s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Chums : PALS

A chum is a friend. The term “chum” originated in the late 1600s as an alternative spelling for “cham”. In turn, “cham” was a shortened form of “chambermate”, a roommate at university.

9 Not spicy, as wings : MILD

There are a few stories about how Buffalo wings were first developed, most of them related to the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, New York. If you’re looking for Buffalo wings on a menu in Buffalo, you’ll note that in and around the city they’re just referred to as “wings”.

13 On the Pacific : ASEA

The Pacific Ocean was given its name by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan. When Magellan sailed into the ocean on his 1521 circumnavigation of the globe, he encountered favorable winds and so called it “Mar Pacifico” meaning “peaceful sea”.

14 China’s continent : ASIA

The world’s most populous country is the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The Republic of China (ROC) is the official name of the sovereign state that we usually call Taiwan.

15 Potato-prep kitchen tool : RICER

A potato ricer is a kitchen tool used to force potato through small holes that are about the diameter of a grain of rice. It usually looks like a large garlic press.

18 Ancient Greek theater : ODEON

In ancient Greece an odeon (also “odeum”) was like a small theater, with “odeon” literally meaning a “building for musical competition”. Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

20 Trinidadian music genre : CALYPSO

The musical style known as calypso originated in Trinidad and Tobago, but there seems to be some debate about which influences were most important as the genre developed. It is generally agreed that the music was imported by African slaves from their homeland, but others emphasize influences of the medieval French troubadours. To me it sounds more African in nature. Calypso reached the masses when it was first recorded in 1912, and it spread around the world in the thirties and forties. It reached its pinnacle with the release of the famous “Banana Boat Song” by Harry Belafonte.

Trinidad and Tobago is a republic in the southern Caribbean that largely comprises the two main islands of Trinidad and Tobago. Something related to Trinidad is Trinidadian.

22 Batman’s butler : ALFRED

Alfred J. Pennyworth is the loyal butler to Bruce Wayne, aka Batman. Alfred is sometimes referred to as “Batman’s batman”. Sir Michael Caine played Alfred in three movies: “Batman Begins”, “The Dark Knight” and “The Dark Knight Rises”.

26 Fishing boat : DORY

A dory is a small boat that’s around 20 feet long with a shallow draft, a flat bottom and a sharp bow. Dories are commonly used for fishing.

27 Actress Pinkett Smith : JADA

Jada Pinkett Smith is an actress from Baltimore, Maryland. Pinkett Smith’s most famous role is the human rebel Niobe in “The Matrix” series of movies. Back in 1990, she auditioned for the TV show “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air”, to play the girlfriend of the character played by Will Smith. She didn’t get the role but did get Will Smith, as the couple were married in 1997.

34 C.S. Lewis’ fantasy world : NARNIA

Apparently it’s not certain how C. S. Lewis came to choose Narnia as the name of the fantasy world featured in his series of children’s books, including “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”. There was an ancient city in Umbria that the Romans called Narnia, but there is no evidence of a link.

39 Disney collectible : CEL

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

43 “Bambi” doe : ENA

Ena is Bambi’s aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

45 Riyadh resident : ARAB

Riyadh is the capital of Saudi Arabia, and is located near the center of the country. The name “Riyadh” translates from Arabic as ‘the gardens”.

47 Played for a sap : USED

“Sap” is slang for “fool, someone easily scammed”. The term arose in the early 1800s in Britain when it was used in “saphead” and “sapskull”. All these words derive from “sapwood”, which is the softwood found in tree trunks between the bark and the heartwood at the center.

50 Tousles, as hair : MUSSES

A “muss” is state of disorder, and a term that probably evolved from “mess”. The phrase “no muss, no fuss” means “no bother, no mess made, no excessive hustle and bustle”.

52 Old-fashioned, close-fitting undergarments : CORSETS

A corset is a close-fitting undergarment that is stiffened with a material such as whalebone. Corsets are more usually worn by women, to shape the body. The word “corset” is a diminutive of the Old French “cors” meaning “body”.

54 Diamond Head’s island : OAHU

Diamond Head on the Hawaiian island of Oahu was given its name by British sailors in the 1800s. These sailors found calcite crystals in the rock surrounding the volcanic tuff cone and mistook the crystals for diamonds.

56 Harbinger of lower temperatures, and a hint to the answers to starred clues : COLD FRONT

A cold front is the leading edge of a relatively cold mass of air that is replacing a warmer mass of air at ground level. In the presence of sufficient moisture in the air, a cold front can bring rain and perhaps thunderstorms.

61 Nero or Claudius : ROMAN

Nero was Emperor of Rome from 54 to 68 CE, and towards the end of his reign participated in the Olympic Games in the year 67. The Roman leader raced in a ten-horse chariot, of which he lost control and nearly perished after being thrown from the vehicle. Acting and singing were Olympic events back then, and Nero also took part in those competitions. By all accounts, Nero performed badly in every event in which he vied, and yet somehow still managed to win Olympic crowns that he paraded around Rome on his return from Greece.

I find Claudius to be the most fascinating of all the Roman Emperors. Claudius had a lot going against him as he walked with a limp and was slightly deaf. He was put in office by the Praetorian Guard (the emperor’s bodyguards) after Caligula was assassinated. Claudius had very little political experience and yet proved to be very forward-thinking and capable.

62 Running shoe brand : AVIA

The “Avia” brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

63 __ Lackawanna Railway : ERIE

The Erie Lackawanna Railway operated between New Jersey and Chicago, and ran from 1960 to 1976. Although some of the routes are still in service today, the original company went bankrupt in the seventies, partly due to the completion of Interstate 80.

Down

1 Lobbying gp. : PAC

A political action committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent, expenditure-only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

3 Luau garland : LEI

“Lei” is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

4 Weekly pay, say : SALARY

It has been suggested that out term “salary” comes from the Latin “sal” meaning “salt”. The idea is that a Roman soldier’s “salarium” might have been an allowance to purchase salt.

8 Sprinkled with baby powder : TALCED

Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

10 *2005 Disney figure-skating film : ICE PRINCESS

“Ice Princess” is a 2005 Disney movie about a teenage girl who dreams about being a professional figure skater. The title character was played by actress Michelle Trachtenberg, who trained for eight months to be able to pull off the many skating scenes.

11 Some July babies : LEOS

The constellation named Leo can be said to resemble a lion. Others say that it resembles a bent coat hanger. “Leo” is the Latin for “lion”, but I’m not sure how to translate “coat hanger” into Latin …

12 Bond villain who attended med school : DR NO

“Dr. No” may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you’ve read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you’ll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. Julius No and Fu Manchu. By the way, author Ian Fleming tells us that Julius No attended medical school in Milwaukee.

15 Sushi __ : ROLL

Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If we want raw fish by itself, then we have to order sashimi.

17 Corrosive chemical : LYE

What we call “lye” is usually sodium hydroxide, although historically the term was used for potassium hydroxide. Lye has many uses, including to cure several foodstuffs. Lye can make olives less bitter, for example. The chemical is also found in canned mandarin oranges, pretzels and Japanese ramen noodles. More concentrated grades of lye are used to clear drains and clean ovens. Scary …

21 Support group for families of drinkers : AL-ANON

Al-Anon and Alateen are fellowships for relatives and friends of alcoholics. Alateen specifically supports teens who are affected by another’s drinking, whereas Al-Anon focuses on people of all ages.

22 Pop-up-producing program : ADWARE

Adware is “advertising-supported software”, an application that includes ads in some form so that the developed can generate revenue. Sometimes deceptive practices can be used to entice a user to install such programs, so adware can sometimes be classed as malware (malicious software).

23 Like a lasso’s business end : LOOPED

Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

27 Former “Idol” judge, familiarly : J.LO

“J.Lo” is the nickname of singer and actress Jennifer Lopez. “J.Lo” is also the title of her second studio album, one released in 2001.

“American Idol” is a spin-off show that was created after the amazing success of the British television show “Pop Idol”. Aired on Fox from 2002 to 2016, the show “jumped ship” and moved to ABC starting in the 2018 season.

29 One with a collateral loan : LIENEE

A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

30 Caesar and Cobb : SALADS

The caesar salad was created by restaurateur Caesar Cardini at the Hotel Caesar’s in Tijuana, Mexico. The original recipe called for whole lettuce leaves that were to be lifted up by the stem and eaten with the fingers.

Ty Cobb’s first cousin, Robert H. Cobb, owned the Brown Derby chain of restaurants. One of his regular customers was the famous Sid Grauman, who ran Grauman’s Chinese Theater. Late one night, Grauman asked for a snack, and Cobb came up with a chopped salad simply made from ingredients he happened to have in the refrigerator. Grauman liked it so much that continued to request it, and the Cobb salad was born.

32 TV shopper’s channel : HSN

The Home Shopping Network (HSN) was the first national shopping network, and was launched locally as the Home Shopping Club in Florida in 1982.

35 Tummy muscles : ABS

The abdominal muscles (abs) are more correctly referred to as the rectus abdominis muscles. They might be referred to as a “six-pack”, or even a “ten-pack”, in a person who has developed the muscles and who has low body fat. In my case, more like a keg …

38 Ex-Florida governor Bush : JEB

Jeb Bush is the son of President George H. W. Bush, and the brother of President George W. Bush. I always thought that Jeb was an American nickname for James or Joseph but I must be wrong, because George and Barbara’s son John Ellis Bush is called “Jeb”. A kind blog reader has suggested the name “Jeb” may have been chosen as JEB are the initials of John Ellis Bush.

47 Loan shark : USURER

Usury used to be the practice of simply lending money at interest, but the term now refers to lending at rates of interest that are excessive.

50 Palindromic title : MADAM

The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

  • Able was I ere I saw Elba
  • A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
  • Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite words is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

51 Old TV dial letters : UHF

TV frequencies here in North America are divided into two bands. The VHF band covers channels 2 through 13; the UHF band covers channels 14 through 83.

52 Kvetch like a fish? : CARP

Carp are freshwater fish that are used as food around the world, although they aren’t very popular in North American kitchens. The ornamental fish that we know as goldfish and koi are all types of carp.

The word “carp” used to mean simply “talk” back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian “karpa” meaning “to brag”. A century later, the Latin word “carpere” meaning “to slander” influenced the use of “to carp” so that it came to mean “to find fault with”.

The word “kvetch” comes to us from Yiddish, with “kvetshn” meaning “to complain” or “squeeze”.

53 Bassoon kin : OBOE

The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name “oboe” comes from the French “hautbois” which means “high wood”.

54 Varied mixture : OLIO

“Olio” is a term meaning “hodgepodge, mixture” that comes from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish “olla”, the clay pot used for cooking.

57 Ab __: from the beginning : OVO

“Ab ovo” translates literally from Latin as “from the egg”, and is used in English to mean “from the beginning”.

58 Salem is its cap. : ORE

Salem is the state capital of Oregon. It is thought that the city takes its name from the older city of Salem, Massachusetts.

59 Actress Long : NIA

Nia Long is an American actress who is probably best known for playing Will Smith’s sometime girlfriend and fiancee Lisa Wilkes on the TV show “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air”.

60 Texas senator Cruz : TED

US Senator Ted Cruz served as Solicitor General for the state of Texas before heading to Washington. Cruz was appointed Solicitor General in 2003 at the age of 32, making him the youngest solicitor general in the country. Famously, Cruz is an opponent of the Affordable Care Act and made a speech in 2013 in the US Senate on the subject that lasted for 21 hours and 19 minutes. It was the fourth longest speech in the history of the Senate.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Chums : PALS
5 Lacks the ability to : CAN’T
9 Not spicy, as wings : MILD
13 On the Pacific : ASEA
14 China’s continent : ASIA
15 Potato-prep kitchen tool : RICER
16 *Metaphorical tablet for the overly nervous : CHILL PILL
18 Ancient Greek theater : ODEON
19 Sailors’ yeses : AYES
20 Trinidadian music genre : CALYPSO
22 Batman’s butler : ALFRED
25 Buyer’s opposite : SELLER
26 Fishing boat : DORY
27 Actress Pinkett Smith : JADA
28 Troubles : AILS
31 Trouble : WOE
32 Sacred : HOLY
34 C.S. Lewis’ fantasy world : NARNIA
36 Mimic : APE
37 *Flattering deception : SNOW JOB
39 Disney collectible : CEL
40 Do a city planner’s job : REZONE
42 Farm cluckers : HENS
43 “Bambi” doe : ENA
44 Biblical garden site : EDEN
45 Riyadh resident : ARAB
47 Played for a sap : USED
48 Influential moneybags : FAT CAT
50 Tousles, as hair : MUSSES
52 Old-fashioned, close-fitting undergarments : CORSETS
54 Diamond Head’s island : OAHU
55 Let up : ABATE
56 Harbinger of lower temperatures, and a hint to the answers to starred clues : COLD FRONT
61 Nero or Claudius : ROMAN
62 Running shoe brand : AVIA
63 __ Lackawanna Railway : ERIE
64 Look intently (at) : PEER
65 Come dramatically into view : LOOM
66 __ between the lines : READ

Down

1 Lobbying gp. : PAC
2 Tapped-off cigarette part : ASH
3 Luau garland : LEI
4 Weekly pay, say : SALARY
5 Dressed like many a superhero : CAPED
6 Without warranty : AS IS
7 No goals, in soccer : NIL
8 Sprinkled with baby powder : TALCED
9 Halfway-through-the-term exam : MIDYEAR
10 *2005 Disney figure-skating film : ICE PRINCESS
11 Some July babies : LEOS
12 Bond villain who attended med school : DR NO
15 Sushi __ : ROLL
17 Corrosive chemical : LYE
21 Support group for families of drinkers : AL-ANON
22 Pop-up-producing program : ADWARE
23 Like a lasso’s business end : LOOPED
24 *Stop-action effect : FREEZE-FRAME
25 “Come again?” : SAY WHAT?
27 Former “Idol” judge, familiarly : J.LO
29 One with a collateral loan : LIENEE
30 Caesar and Cobb : SALADS
32 TV shopper’s channel : HSN
33 Type of short play : ONE-ACT
35 Tummy muscles : ABS
38 Ex-Florida governor Bush : JEB
41 Astronomical way to wish : ON A STAR
46 Imp : RASCAL
47 Loan shark : USURER
49 High-schooler, typically : TEEN
50 Palindromic title : MADAM
51 Old TV dial letters : UHF
52 Kvetch like a fish? : CARP
53 Bassoon kin : OBOE
54 Varied mixture : OLIO
57 Ab __: from the beginning : OVO
58 Salem is its cap. : ORE
59 Actress Long : NIA
60 Texas senator Cruz : TED

15 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 15 Jul 19, Monday”

  1. Monday’s are always fun!

    Does anyone understand Bill’s answer to LIENEE? I do this when I miss a COPY/PASTE.

    1. Even I don’t understand it, Forrest 🙂 As you suggest, it was a copy/paste error. All fixed now, thanks to your much-appreciated help.

      1. Couldn’t it mean one who receives a lien? The one who gives it would be
        the liener? Might be stretching the vocabulary a bit, but that sounds like
        the constructor’s intent. May not be real words, though.

        We are running behind because of Hurricane Barry and possibly won’t
        get a Monday paper. But we got Sunday’s paper today, one day late,
        tried the LAT puzzle and scored a very good 95%.

        Kudos to you, Bill, for scoring your exact average time. A Game.

  2. LAT: 5:51, no errors. Newsday: 4:36, no errors. NYT: 4:47, no errors. WSJ: 8:46, no errors; got Friday’s meta right but, as usual, no word on my mug 😜. New Yorker: 12:50, no errors. CHE: 10:23, no errors.

    BEQ: 1:08:27 (some of which was walk-away time), with a one-square error at the intersection of 14D (a politician from the 80’s whom I barely remembered) and 24A (a rapper I’d never heard of). Surprised I did that well on this puzzle. The clue for 46D contains a misspelling (“presdiential” instead of “presidential”), a thing one seldom sees in crossword puzzles. I would also contend that the clue for 39D (“Nerves, metaphorically” for the somewhat off-color “COJONES”) is not just misleading, but actually wrong: the “s” should be deleted.

    1. Dave! Can I just say thank you for referring to that word as off color!! I really can’t stand when English speakers toss out that word– they wouldn’t do it with the English equivalent! 🤨

  3. Finished, no errors, but without actually knowing ALFRED, OAHU, OVO and ENA. Today my weakness is vowels,

    T G I M

  4. Greetings!!🦆

    Very easy Monday; no errors. Never heard Ab OVO but everything else was straightforward.
    Anyone else remember Nat King Cole’s “Calypso Blues?” Cute song. 😎

    Be well ~~🚋⚾️

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.