LA Times Crossword 4 Jul 19, Thursday

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Constructed by: Ed Sessa
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Hidden Tax

Happy 4th of July, everyone! Themed answers each include a type of TAX as a HIDDEN word:

  • 56A Income-reducing inequity, or what can be found in the four other longest puzzle answers : HIDDEN TAX
  • 17A Meets unexpectedly : BUMPS INTO (“sin” tax)
  • 23A Works with one’s private tutor, say : TAKES A LESSON (“sales” tax)
  • 34A Emergency run-through opening : THIS IS JUST A TEST (“state” tax)
  • 46A Utah’s state tree : QUAKING ASPEN (“gas” tax)

Bill’s time: 4m 47s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 “A revolution is not a dinner party” statesman : MAO

According to Mao Zedung:

A revolution is not a dinner party, or writing an essay, or painting a picture, or doing embroidery; it cannot be so refined, so leisurely and gentle, so temperate, kind, courteous, restrained and magnanimous. A revolution is an insurrection, an act of violence by which one class overthrows another.

14 Petting zoo critter : LLAMA

Many female mammals lick off their newborn. That’s not an option for llamas as their tongues only reach out of their mouths about half an inch. Instead, llama dams nuzzle their young and hum to them.

16 Lexus rival : ACURA

Acura is the luxury brand of the Honda Motor Company. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

17 Meets unexpectedly : BUMPS INTO (“sin” tax)

A sin tax is a levy placed goods that are considered to be harmful. Examples might be taxes placed specifically on alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, sweetened beverages, fast food and gambling. Sin taxes are imposed to discourage use. The related Pigovian tax is imposed to offset the cost to society of using the “sinful” goods or services.

20 Rock band need : AMP

An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

21 Board game with rooms : CLUE

Clue is board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as “Cluedo”. Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it’s a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

25 Emily Dickinson’s hometown : AMHERST

On a road trip around the country a few years ago, my wife and I had a very disappointing stop in Amherst, Massachusetts intending to visit the old home of Emily Dickinson. We hadn’t done our homework and failed to note that the home was only open for tours on certain days of the week, and not the day we were there (so be warned!). Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily’s younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades.

28 Longtime nighttime host : LENO

Jay Leno was born James Leno in New Rochelle, New York. Jay’s father was the son of Italian immigrants, and his mother was from Scotland. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts and actually dropped out of school on the advice of a high school guidance counsellor. However, years later he went to Emerson college and earned a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy. Leno also started a comedy club at Emerson in 1973. Today Jay Leno is a car nut and owns about 200 vehicles of various types. You can check them out on his website: www.jaylenosgarage.com.

29 Bread brushed with ghee : NAAN

Ghee is clarified butter used in South Asian cuisines. “Ghee” comes from Sanskrit, and translates as “sprinkled”.

34 Emergency run-through opening : THIS IS JUST A TEST (“state” tax)

There are seven states in the US that don’t collect state income tax: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming.

39 Tennis’ Andy Murray’s title : SIR

Andy Murray is a tennis player from Scotland who became British number in 2006, rising to world number one in 2016. Much to the delight of the locals, Murray won the Wimbledon Championship in 2013, making him the first British male player to win in 77 years. Murray also won Olympic gold in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, and again in the Rio Games in 2016. Sir Andy Murray was knighted in 2017.

41 Sign of holiness : HALO

The Greek word “halos” is the name given to the ring of light around the sun or moon, which gives us our word “halo” that is used for a radiant light depicted above the head of a saintly person.

46 Utah’s state tree : QUAKING ASPEN (“gas” tax)

The “quaking” aspen tree is so called because the structure of the leaves causes them to move easily in the wind, to “tremble, quake”.

We pay about 50 cents a gallon in federal and state taxes of gasoline. I’ve always considered ourselves very lucky as to me this a low tax rate. We pay about $3.50 a US gallon in taxes in Ireland. Yep, $3.50 a gallon in tax alone …

55 Church offering : TITHE

Traditionally, a tithe is a payment of one tenth of a person’s annual income and is usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions, and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

59 Many a Monopoly sq. : AVE

The street names in the original US version of the board game Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

60 “Live at the Acropolis” keyboardist : YANNI

Yanni is a remarkable Greek musician who is very successful in the world of New Age music. What I find so remarkable is that he is a self-taught musician. Yanni was born Yiannis Chryssomallis in Kalamata, Greece and moved to the US in 1972 to attend the University of Minnesota.

“Yanni Live at the Acropolis” is an album and music video featuring Greek New Age musician Yanni. The album and video was recorded live in 1993 at a concert in the Herodes Atticus Theatre that was built in 161 AD on the southwest slope of the Acropolis in Athens. The event was billed as a fundraising project for PBS television and the video is still used to bring in cash for the TV network. “Yanni Live at the Acropolis” is the second best-selling music video of all time, behind “Thriller” by Michael Jackson.

Down

1 Idris of “Luther” : ELBA

English actor Idris Elba plays the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and played the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally appears as a disk jockey using the name “DJ Big Driis”.

“Luther” is a British television series starring Idris Elba in the title role as Detective Chief Inspector John Luther. There has been talk about developing a US version of “Luther”, and a Russian version first broadcast in 2016 using the title “Klim”.

3 Pack (down) : TAMP

To tamp is to pack down tightly by tapping. “Tamp” was originally used to specifically describe the action of packing down sand or dirt around an explosive prior to detonation.

4 Little dickens : IMP

A little dickens is a little devil, an imp.

5 Brickyard 400 acronym : NASCAR

National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR)

The Brickyard 400 is a NASCAR race held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the same place that the Indy 500 has been run since 1911. The inaugural Brickyard 400 was run in 1994, and is now NASCAR’s most attended event. “Brickyard” is a nickname for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, as for many years the track was paved with actual bricks. The bricks were covered over with asphalt some time ago, but there is a one-yard wide strip of bricks still exposed at the start/finish line.

6 Courtly dance : MINUET

A minuet is a dance that originated in France. At some point, the middle section of the minuet was routinely scored for just a trio of instruments. The resulting composition was known as a minuet and trio. In the Classical Era, a minuet and trio was often chosen as the third movement of a symphony.

8 Middle name adopted by John Lennon : ONO

John Lennon and Yoko Ono married at the height of the Vietnam War in 1969. The couple decided to use the inevitable publicity surrounding their wedding and honeymoon to promote peace in the world. They honeymooned in the Presidential Suite of the Amsterdam Hilton, inviting the world’s press to join them and to witness their “bed-in”. They spent the week talking about peace, and an end to war. The marriage and bed-in is chronicled by the Beatles in their song “The Ballad of John and Yoko”. A few weeks after the marriage, Lennon adopted the middle name “Ono” by deed poll.

9 Mexicali mansion : HACIENDA

Mexicali is a Mexican city in the state of Baja that lies on the US border, adjacent to Calexico, California. Mexicali is the most northerly city in Latin America.

12 Poetry Muse : ERATO

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry. She is often depicted with a wreath of myrtle and roses, and playing a lyre.

22 Icy forecast : SLEET

Apparently, “sleet” is a term used to describe two different weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets that are smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls.

24 “Heidi” setting : ALPS

“Heidi” is a children’s book written by Swiss author Johanna Spyri and published in two parts. The first is “Heidi’s years of learning and travel”, and the second “Heidi makes use of what she has learned”. The books tell the story of a young girl in the care of her grandfather in the Swiss Alps. The most famous film adaptation of the story is the 1937 movie of the same name starring Shirley Temple in the title role.

25 Armadillo meal : ANTS

The nine-banded armadillo is the most common species of armadillo found in the Americas. The “bands” are bits of armor that circle the body of the armadillo. The term “nine-banded” is a bit of misnomer as there aren’t always nine bands, but there are usually seven to eleven.

26 When repeated, fish on a menu : MAHI

“Mahi-mahi” is the Hawaiian name for the dolphinfish, which is also called the dorado. The mahi-mahi is an ugly looking creature if ever I saw one …

30 Dim __: traditional Chinese food : SUM

Dim sum is a Chinese cuisine made up of small portions of various dishes. The tradition of serving dim sum is associated with the serving of tea, when small delicacies were offered to travelers and guests along with tea as a refreshment. The name “dim sum” translates as “touch the heart” implying that dim sum is not a main meal, just a snack “that touches the heart”.

32 Peace Prize city : OSLO

The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded “in memory of Alfred Nobel”. Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and that award is presented in Oslo.

37 Freud contemporary : JUNG

Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist, and the founder of analytical psychology. Jung was very much associated with the analysis of dreams, and also introduced us to the psychological concepts of introversion and extroversion.

42 Schusser’s topper : SKI HAT

A schuss is a very fast run downhill in skiing, one with no turns taken to slow the pace of the descent. “Schuss” is a German word for “shot”.

44 Columnist’s page : OP-ED

“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

45 Overnight flight : RED-EYE

A red-eye flight is one departing late at night and arriving early the next morning. The term is a reference to tired passengers disembarking with red eyes.

46 Saudi Arabia’s neighbor : QATAR

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

52 Italian peak : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcano in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts. It is sometimes referred to as “Mongibello” in Italian, and as “Mungibeddu” in Sicilian. The English name “Etna” comes from the Greek “aitho” meaning “I eat”.

53 McNally’s mapmaking partner : RAND

Rand McNally is a company long associated with the city of Chicago. Its roots go back to 1856 when William Rand opened a printing shop in the city. Two years later he hired an Irish immigrant named Andrew McNally and the pair turned to printing tickets and timetables for the railroad industry. They diversified into “railroad guides” in 1870, including the first Rand McNally map in the December 1872 edition. When automobile travel started to become significant, Rand and McNally turned their attention to roads and they published their first road map in 1904, a map of New York City. Rand and McNally popularized the use of highway numbers, and indeed erected many roadside highway signs themselves, long before the state and federal authorities adopted the idea.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Settle for leftovers : EAT IN
6 “A revolution is not a dinner party” statesman : MAO
9 Additions to the staff : HIRES
14 Petting zoo critter : LLAMA
15 Wayfarer’s stop : INN
16 Lexus rival : ACURA
17 Meets unexpectedly : BUMPS INTO (“sin” tax)
19 Connecting waterway : CANAL
20 Rock band need : AMP
21 Board game with rooms : CLUE
22 Woo with a tune : SING TO
23 Works with one’s private tutor, say : TAKES A LESSON (“sales” tax)
25 Emily Dickinson’s hometown : AMHERST
28 Longtime nighttime host : LENO
29 Bread brushed with ghee : NAAN
30 Zipped : SPED
31 Feathery wrap : BOA
34 Emergency run-through opening : THIS IS JUST A TEST (“state” tax)
39 Tennis’ Andy Murray’s title : SIR
40 Bud : CHUM
41 Sign of holiness : HALO
42 Facial tissue? : SKIN
43 Opposite of engagement : BOREDOM
46 Utah’s state tree : QUAKING ASPEN (“gas” tax)
50 When many workdays start : AT NINE
51 Said, “The dog ate my homework,” probably : LIED
52 Notable period : ERA
55 Church offering : TITHE
56 Income-reducing inequity, or what can be found in the four other longest puzzle answers : HIDDEN TAX
58 Fake handle : ALIAS
59 Many a Monopoly sq. : AVE
60 “Live at the Acropolis” keyboardist : YANNI
61 Takes it easy : RESTS
62 “Let’s do it!” : YES!
63 Mild oath : EGADS

Down

1 Idris of “Luther” : ELBA
2 College benefactor : ALUM
3 Pack (down) : TAMP
4 Little dickens : IMP
5 Brickyard 400 acronym : NASCAR
6 Courtly dance : MINUET
7 Pays for a hand : ANTES
8 Middle name adopted by John Lennon : ONO
9 Mexicali mansion : HACIENDA
10 “Just you watch me” : I CAN SO
11 Steps up a ladder : RUNGS
12 Poetry Muse : ERATO
13 Place for a makeover : SALON
18 Sorts : ILKS
22 Icy forecast : SLEET
23 Change for a 50 : TENS
24 “Heidi” setting : ALPS
25 Armadillo meal : ANTS
26 When repeated, fish on a menu : MAHI
27 Tresses : HAIR
30 Dim __: traditional Chinese food : SUM
31 Spot on a sweater? : BEAD
32 Peace Prize city : OSLO
33 Minute matter : ATOM
35 Gross quality : ICKINESS
36 Stand out : SHINE
37 Freud contemporary : JUNG
38 If so : THEN
42 Schusser’s topper : SKI HAT
43 They’re usually not hits : B-SIDES
44 Columnist’s page : OP-ED
45 Overnight flight : RED-EYE
46 Saudi Arabia’s neighbor : QATAR
47 Of practical value : UTILE
48 Voices against : ANTIS
49 Vibrant : ALIVE
52 Italian peak : ETNA
53 McNally’s mapmaking partner : RAND
54 Geometric reference line : AXIS
56 __ fever : HAY
57 Scraggly horse : NAG

16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 4 Jul 19, Thursday”

  1. LAT: 6:34, no errors (online, for once, because I was sitting in the dark beside my chimenea, listening to bombs going off in my neighborhood 😳); I guess one of the signs that you’re getting old is that you don’t enjoy fireworks (either that, or you’re a dog 😜). Newsday: 8:51, no errors. BEQ: 12:25, no errors.

    1. We had the first mortar blasts around 9, and they continued to about 11. Par for the course… for the 3rd. Tonight, our neighborhood will probably remind us of Iraq (along with any people unlucky enough to have PTSD).

      I don’t think it’s age that makes one “anti-fireworks”. I think it’s *compassion*. I don’t understand why so many people cling to their right to be able to “blow sh*t up”, even for ONE day, when it has such terrible effects on pets, veterans, a few of the people handling the fireworks each year, and on the environment (we had a large swath of our lovely Columbia Gorge burnt out by casually tossed fireworks a few years back). If I had my way, if you want to see a fireworks display, you head out to one of the professional ones at the baseball park, or near a riverfront, and “ooh and aah” to your heart’s content. There’s no reason for most cities to turn into “temporary war zones” with the M-80s, mortars and gunfire we have to endure.

  2. 9 mins 7 seconds: glacial when compared with Bill’s time! He went inside 5 minutes for the second time this week!!!

    No mistakes, though, that’s the important thing.

    Once again, an invisible theme that doesn’t help while solving, and isn’t worth going back into the puzzle for when you’re done. I really don’t know why the constructors bother sometime.

  3. No Googles nor errors, but didn’t know SIR or NASCAR (sports).

    Had shAKING before QUAKING and “nine am” before AT NINE.

    Kept trying to find X’es in the theme lines. Duh.

    Still old school about noting abbrevs, as in AMP, ALUM.

    Have a great 4th. My mother would have been 100 today.

  4. 9:24. Happy Birthday, America. Nothing July 4th-ish in either this or the NYT today…..except taxation, I suppose. It’s not an accident when I moved from Texas that I moved to Nevada – two of the states without a state income tax. Nevada has low taxes everywhere as so much of its revenue comes from gaming and the tourist industry. Texas, however, has awful (very high) property taxes which essentially serve as a state income tax in terms of outgoing dollars.

    One more uninteresting note on state taxes, those 7 listed in the write up have no state taxes. Tennessee and New Hampshire don’t either on employment derived income, but they do have a state tax on dividend income and investment income.

    And one more even less interesting fact about rabies (from yesterday) – the rabies shots of old into the stomach haven’t been done since the 80’s. Now it’s “just” 4 shots in the arm over a 2 week period. What I found interesting is that if you’re able to catch the animal that bit you, they can observe it for 10 days before deciding whether you need the shots or not. I was surprised that you could wait so long. You can’t kill the animal, however. Apparently if it’s dead, it’s harder (impossible?) to determine whether it had rabies or not.

    Hope everyone finds a way to have a safe and fun 4th of July

    Best –

    1. As a doctor, I always recommend getting the shots because rabies is a fatal disease with only one rare exception!

  5. LAT: 5:45, no errors. Bill indeed did very well to get under 5 with this. Newsday: 12:04, no errors. Got a BEQ and Fireball that will have to wait until later.

  6. Well I just felt my first earthquake since moving here. I was washing my hands and thought I was getting dizzy. Everything was swaying back and forth. When I saw the towel on the hook on the wall swaying as well, I realized what was happening.

    It wasn’t much here in Las Vegas – just a few seconds of rocking back and forth. Any of youse in LA feel it? It was a 6.4 so no small quake. But it was in the middle of nowhere so not much damage I suppose.

    Best –

  7. I have a sister-in-law that lives in Westlake Village, CA. I am fixing to
    e-mail her and learn how far she is from Kern County. I did just learn
    that her area is taking 9-1-1 calls only at this writing, so they were affected.

    2 errors for 99%. I guess I should put an asterisk, because I looked up the
    State tree of Utah. My dictionary said Blue Spruce, but that didn’t fit. So,
    I Googled it and learned that the change to Quaking Aspen took place in 2014.
    That dates my dictionary. Fun and educational, this puzzle playing.

    Dumb miss; I put CHIN for SKIN. I should have looked harder and seen that chin
    would not be considered to be a tissue. Hindsight, etc. and etc.

    Happy Fourth to everyone and another congrats to Bill for breaking the
    5-minute barrier. I wonder what his record time is? Or other record times.

  8. “It’s nice for a change” to complete a Thursday puzzle with no errors.

    HAPPY 4TH EVERYONE

    Eddie

  9. Speaking of “quaking” aspen’s, we did have a quaker this morning. It’s been a long time since I felt one. This was 100 miles NE of LA & they said 5 miles deep.

    And Jeff, they do make you feel dizzy. I had to grab the counter in the kitchen to steady myself. It was actually close to Vegas. Don’t hang anything heavy over your bed and have flashlights handy. Welcome to our world.

    Have a safe 4th everyone!

  10. We live in the West LA area and the quake was felt as a gentle swaying of our home. It did go on for awhile but nothing anxiety producing (and I lived in the San Fernando Valley for the 1971 Sylmar quake and here for 1994 Northridge quake, both quite severe).

    On my 2:30 to 4:30 AM bike ride this morning I counted 16 wild bunnies running around and across the part of the ride that is sort of off road. I think that sets a new personal best “bunny record”.

  11. Can I tell an earthquake story?! I was visiting Orange Co during the ’86 Palm Springs event-my personal most impressive earthquake. My aunt had a friend who worked at one of the big resorts in Palm Springs. The friend said that as soon as the shaking stopped the front desk phone was flooded with guests saying they were checking out. Hah! Easterners!
    I’ll take an earthquake over a tornado any day. You don’t see it coming, and it’s usually over by the time you figure out what’s happening.

    I was visiting my daughter in Denver once when the tornado sirens went off. I could see the storm cell overhead. It made for a very tense afternoon.

  12. Pretty easy Thursday for me; took 14 minutes with no errors. This one just flowed, except for two entries: MINUte and AT NINE, where I had Nine AM. Didn’t really notice the theme and didn’t bother after I finished.

    On one of my motorcycle tours (2008)(M.P. -> near Bakersfield -> Ridgecrest -> Lone Pine -> Oroville -> M.P.), I spent the night at the epicenter of today’s earthquake, before riding through the Panamint Valley and part of Death Valley. It’s a military town at the entrance to China Lake. The area between there and the ghost town Ballarat is just beautiful. Scariest part was the ride, near a car with a driver texting, between Sacramento and Berkeley…sheesh!

    Happy Fourth everyone!!

  13. Happy 4th!!🇺🇸

    No errors. I also found this one quite easy for a Thursday. Some interesting entries, if you overlook YANNI. 😁

    I didn’t feel the quake! I’m in the Los Feliz area of Los Angeles, and it was felt in my neighborhood, but I’m not even sure I was awake when it occurred…these things usually wake me up. Happened to turn on the TV and that’s how I found out. My first thought was “DID I PAY MY LAST EQ INSURANCE BILL??” Anyway, it’s unnerving. This was a big one. Glad everyone is okay. 👌

    Dirk– sounds like a nice part of the state and one I’ve never visited! Now I’d like to make that drive.

    Be well~~🚋⚾️

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