LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Nov 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Bruce Haight
THEME: Going on a Bender … each of today’s themed answers BENDS through a 90-degree angle, going from the across-direction to the down-direction, and vice versa. The direction taken is hinted at by the answer itself:

58A. Wax eloquent … and what to do to solve eight puzzle clues TURN A PHRASE

1A. Gets hitched TAKES / THE PLUNGE
7A. Unpopular party gal DEBBIE / DOWNER
13A. Goes 0 for 20, say HITS / A SLUMP
48A. How some Niagara stunts are done OVER THE / FALLS
43D. Keep battling PRESS / FORWARD
68D. More than breaking even COMING OUT / AHEAD
74D. Play a trick (on) PUT ONE / ACROSS
76D. Passenger’s direction at the corner HANG A / RIGHT

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Unpopular party gal DEBBIE / DOWNER
“Debbie Downer” is a slang phrase describing someone who knows how to bring down the mood. There was a character on “Saturday Night Live” who took the name Debbie Downer, played by comic actress Rachel Dratch.

23. Maestro Toscanini ARTURO
Arturo Toscanini was an Italian conductor of classical music. Toscanini took up the baton for the first time under sensational circumstances in 1886. He was attending a performance of “Aida” in Rio de Janeiro in the role of assistant chorus master, on a night when a substitute conductor was leading the orchestra. The substitute was in charge because the lead conductor had been forced to step down by striking performers who would not work with him. The disgruntled lead conductor led the audience in booing the unfortunate substitute, forcing him off the stage. Yet another substitute attempted to lead the performance, but he could not overcome the hostility of the crowd. The musicians themselves begged Toscanini to take up the baton, for the first time in his life, and simply because he knew the score by heart. After over an hour of mayhem, Toscanini led the company in a remarkable performance to marvelous acclaim. He had just launched his conducting career.

24. Half of a storybook duo HANSEL
“Hansel and Gretel” is a Germanic fairy tale found in the collection of the Brothers Grimm. It tells of two siblings, Hansel and Gretel, the children of a woodcutter. The youngsters are abandoned in a forest at the behest of an evil stepmother. Clever Hansel hears of the plan and leaves a trail of pebbles so that he and his sister can find their way home, which they do. But the children are abandoned again and this time leave a trail of breadcrumbs. Unfortunately, the crumbs are eaten by birds and so the children do indeed become lost. But eventually they do all live happily ever after …

25. Knocks in the theater PANS
To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

28. Put an edge on WHET
A “whetstone” is stone that is used to sharpen (“to whet”) the edge of blade. Nowadays, the best whetstones are actually artificially made, using a bonded ceramic abrasive such as silicon carbide.

30. Big Ten sch. PSU
The athletic teams of Pennsylvania State University (PSU) are called the Nittany Lions, or in the case of the female teams, the Lady Lions. The Nittany Lion was introduced as a mascot way back in 1904 and is modeled after mountain lions that used to roam Mount Nittany located near the school’s campus.

31. “The Simpsons” disco guy STU
On “The Simpsons” the character of Disco Stu is voiced by Hank Azaria, although he was voiced for a while by Phil Hartman. Disco Stu is described as “a black, wrinkly John Travolta”.

36. Former South African president for whom a gold coin is named KRUGER
The Krugerrand is a gold coin minted in South Africa. The coin takes its name from the Rand, the South African unit of currency, and Paul Kruger, the President of the South African Republic whose face appears on the obverse of the coin. The Krugerrand is made from a gold alloy that is almost 92% pure i.e. 22 karats.

37. Caine captain QUEEG
Herman Wouk won a Pulitzer in 1951 for his novel “The Caine Mutiny”. The story involves mutiny and court-martial aboard a US Navy vessel and reflected, at least partly, the personal experiences of Wouk as he served in the Pacific in WWII aboard a destroyer-minesweeper. The novel was adapted into a marvelous film released in 1954 starring Humphrey Bogart as Philip Queeg, the harsh captain of the USS Caine.

41. Harold’s film partner KUMAR
“Harold & Kumar” is a trilogy of comedy films about two potheads played by John Cho (Harold) and Kal Penn (Kumar). Not my cup of tea …

45. Pac-Man feature MAZE
The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero “Paku”, known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

47. Salad veggies CUKES
Cucumber (cuke)

48. How some Niagara stunts are done OVER THE / FALLS
The mighty Niagara River flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, and forms part of the border between the US and Canada. The river is only about 35 miles long (so some describe it as a “strait”) and has a drop in elevation of 325 feet along its length, with 165 feet of that drop taking place at Niagara Falls.

52. Buttermilk rider EVANS
Dale Evans was the stage name of actress and singer Lucille Wood Smith, famous as the third wife of Roy Rogers. Evans was from Uvalde, Texas, and had a rough start in life. She eloped with her first husband when she was just 14 years old, and had her first child at 15. That first marriage ended in divorce when she was 17 in 1929, the same year she started on her second marriage. Roy Rogers was Evans’ fourth husband and they married in 1947, a marriage that lasted for 51 years, until Rogers passed away in 1998. Dale Evans rode a buckskin quarter horse called Buttermilk.

53. Bee output QUILT
Back in 18th-century America, when neighbors would gather to work for the benefit of one of their group, such a meeting was called a “bee”. The name “bee” was an allusion to the social nature of the insect. In modern parlance, a further element of entertainment and pleasure has been introduced, for example in a “quilting bee”, or even a “spelling bee”.

54. Rains cats and dogs POURS
It has been “raining cats and dogs” at least since the 1700s, but no one seems to know the origin of the expression.

60. “The Clan of the Cave Bear” heroine AYLA
Ayla is a little Cro-Magnon girl who is orphaned and then adopted by a Neanderthal tribe, as told in “The Clan of the Cave Bear”, the first of a series of novels written by Jean Auel that set in prehistoric times. I haven’t read any of Auel’s books myself, but they are on my reading to-do list as my wife recommends them. They sound interesting …

61. __-Cat SNO
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four, independently-mounted tracks.

62. Beauty’s admirer BEAST
“Beauty and the Beast” is a fairy tale was that was written by novelist Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. Titled “La belle et la bête” in French, the story was first published in 1756.

67. Violin-playing comedian BENNY
The comedic great Jack Benny’s real name was Benjamin Kubelsky. Benny was born in 1894 and passed away in 1974 at the age of 80. Although, when Benny was on stage he always claimed to be just 39 years old!

68. Price-fixing bloc CARTEL
A “cartel” is a group of independent businesses that cooperate to regulate production, pricing and marketing of their common product(s).

70. Physics particle QUARK
Quarks are elementary atomic particles that combine to make composite particles called “hadrons”. I’m really only familiar with the really stable hadrons i.e. protons and neutrons. There are six types of quarks (referred to as “flavors”). These flavors are up, down, strange, charm, bottom and top. The term “quark” was taken from James Joyce’s book “Finnegans Wake”. However, the word coined by Joyce is pronounced “kwark”, and the particle’s name is pronounced “kwork”.

74. __ willow PUSSY
Pussy Willow is the name given to small willow and sallow shrubs, but only when their furry catkins are young in early spring. The flowering shoots of pussy willow are used as substitutes for palm branches on Palm Sunday in regions too far north for palms to grow.

75. “Now We Are Six” author AA MILNE
“Now We Are Six” is a collection of children’s verses by A. A. Milne, the creator of Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends. It was published in 1927, and illustrated by E. H. Shepard, the man behind the illustrations for the Winnie-the-Pooh stories as well as Kenneth Graham’s equally famous story “The Wind in the Willows”. Indeed, eleven of the verses in “Now We Are Six” are illustrated with images of Winnie the Pooh. Sounds like one for the grand-kids …

76. __ Sack HACKY
Wham-O was founded in 1948, with the company’s first product being the Wham-O slingshot. Since then, Wham-O has market a string of hit toys including the Hula Hoop, the Frisbee, the Slip ‘N Slide, Silly String, the Hacky Sack and the Boogie Board.

80. “Designing Women” actress Annie POTTS
Annie Potts is an actress from Nashville, Tennessee. She had roles in successful films such as “Ghostbusters” and “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and did voice work for “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 2”. Potts was lucky to survive a car crash when she was 21 years old, as she broke nearly every bone in her lower body.

87. Motley, as a crew RAGTAG
“Ragtag and bobtail” is a colorful phrase that’s used to describe the lowest classes, or the rabble. A “bobtail” is a horse that has had its tail cut short, a word that goes back as least as far as Shakespeare as he used it in “King Lear”. A “tag” is a piece of cloth that is torn and hanging, which was readily combined with “rag” in the original phrase “tag, rag and bobtail”. This idiom, perhaps originally quoted from Samuel Pepys in his diary in 1659, referred to the lower classes as “tag, rag and bobtail, dancing, singing and drinking”. The phrase evolved, giving us our contemporary word “ragtag” meaning ragged and unkempt.

91. Ewan’s “Moulin Rouge!” co-star NICOLE
Nicole Kidman is an Australian-American actress whose breakthrough role was the female lead in 1989’s “Dead Calm”. Kidman was actually born in Hawaii, to Australian parents. As a result, she has dual citizenship of Australia and the US.

Ewan McGregor is a very talented Scottish actor, one who got his break in the 1996 film “Trainspotting”. McGregor’s first big Hollywood role was playing the young Obi-Wan-Kenobi in the “Star Wars” prequels. Less known is his televised marathon motorcycle journey from London to New York via central Europe, Ukraine, Siberia, Mongolia and Canada. The 2004 trip was shown as “Long Way Round” on TV. McGregor did a similar trip in 2007 called “Long Way Down”, which took him and the same travelling companion from the north of Scotland to Cape Town in South Africa.

“Moulin Rouge!” is musical film that was released in 2001, starring Nicole Kidman as the star of the Moulin Rouge cabaret, and Ewan McGregor as the young man who falls in love with her. Although set in the early 1900s, the film uses many, many contemporary songs. There were so many that it took the producers almost two years to secure the rights to use the music.

Down
1. Recipe amts. TBSPS
Tablespoon (tbsp)

2. Buddhist who has attained Nirvana ARHAT
“Arhat” is a Sanskrit word, the exact translation of which is somewhat disputed, with the various Buddhist traditions assuming different meanings. Translations vary from “worthy one” to “vanquisher of enemies”.

Nirvana is a philosophical concept in some Indian-based religions. In the Buddhist tradition, nirvana is the state of being free from suffering i.e. not experiencing craving, anger or other afflicting states.

3. Reeves of “The Lake House” KEANU
Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989), a cop in “Speed” (1994) and the main antagonist Neo in “The Matrix” series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name “Keanu” is Hawaiian for “the coldness”.

“The Lake House” is a marvelous 2006 film starring Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock as two residents of a lake house who fall in love. The pair never actually meet, as they are separated by time, having lived in the house two years apart. They correspond by leaving letters for each other in the lake house’s mailbox. The 2006 film is remake of a South Korean movie “Il Mare” that was released in 2000. Clever plot, well presented …

5. Indy letters STP
STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

7. Bureau division DRAWER
“Bureau” is the French word for “office, desk”. The term was originally used in French for the cloth covering put on the work surface of a desk, from “burel”, a coarse woolen cloth used for that covering.

10. __-ray Disc BLU
A CD player reads the information on the disc using a laser beam. The beam is produced by what’s called a laser diode, a device similar to a light-emitting diode (LED) except that a laser beam is emitted. That laser beam is usually red in CD and DVD players. Blu-ray players are so called as they use blue lasers.

13. Cops HEAT
“To cop” was northern British dialect for “to seize, catch”. This verb evolved in the noun “copper”, describing a policeman, someone who catches criminals. “Copper” is often shortened to “cop”.

14. Creator of Q and M IAN
James Bond was of course the creation of the writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized “007” to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

In military circles a quartermaster is an officer responsible for supplying equipment and supplies to troops. The term “quartermaster” comes from “quartier-maître”, a ship’s officer in the French navy who was responsible for stowing cargo and supplies in the hold. In the James Bond stories, the character called “Q” is named for “quartermaster”.

The character “M” in the James Bond stories is the head of Secret Intelligence Service, also called MI6. The name “M” is chosen as a nod to former head of MI5 Maxwell Knight who routinely signed his memos simply as “M”.

27. Taiwan-based computer company ACER
I owned several Acer laptops, which are for my money the most reliable machine at the best price. Acer is a Taiwanese company that I used to visit a lot when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed with the company’s dedication to quality, and haven’t been let down since.

36. Tigers Hall of Fame outfielder Al KALINE
Al Kaline is a former Major League Baseball player. Kaline played his whole career with the Detroit Tigers, and then became a sportscaster for the team when he retired. He now works as a front office official for Detroit. Given the years that Kaline has devoted to the same team, it’s perhaps not surprising that he has the nickname “Mr. Tiger”.

39. Two-time U.S. Open champ TREVINO
Lee Trevino is an American golfer of Mexican descent, and so has the nicknames “The Merry Mex” and “Supermex”. He is well known for his great sense of humor and for playing pranks on the golf course. For many years, Trevino wore a Band-Aid on his arm while playing, covering the tattoo with the name of his ex-wife.

41. One of Fran’s puppets KUKLA
“Kukla, Fran and Ollie” is an early television show that aired from 1947-1957. Kukla and Ollie (Oliver J. Dragon) were puppets and Fran was Fran Allison, usually the only human on the show.

42. Only NFL quarterback with more than 10,000 pass attempts FAVRE
Brett Favre is best known as the former starting-quarterback for the Green Bay Packers. Favre retired in 2010 after playing with the Minnesota Vikings for a short time. Among the many NFL records held by Favre, he has thrown the most career touchdown passes, and has made the most consecutive starts.

44. “Jaws” shark hunter QUINT
Quint is the professional shark hunter in the “Jaws” novel and film, the owner of the boat named the Orca that is used to track down the great white. In the 1975 movie, Quint is played by Robert Shaw.

50. Greek HELLENE
Someone from Greece can be called a Hellene. “Ellas” is the Greek word for “Greece”, the name of the country. Greece is also known as the “Hellenic” Republic.

55. Like some chards OAKY
The Chardonnay grape is believed to have originated in the Burgundy wine region of France. Now it’s grown “everywhere”. Drinkers of California “Chards” seem to be particularly fond of “oak” flavor, so most Chardonnay wines are aged in oak barrels.

58. Shore fliers TERNS
Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

59. Name of eight English kings HENRY
There have been eight kings of England with the name Henry. Henry I of England was a son of William the Conqueror. According to legend, Henry died from eating “a surfeit of lampreys”, or more likely food poisoning. Lampreys look like a cross between a fish and an eel. Henry VIII was the last male to lead the the House of Tudor, as his daughter Queen Elizabeth I died without issue.

64. Filling fully SATING
“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

71. Rock band 10,000 __ MANIACS
10,000 Maniacs is a rock band from Jamestown, New York that formed in 1981. Perhaps the most famous former band member is singer-songwriter Natalie Merchant who was the lead vocalist from 1981 until she left in 1993 to pursue her solo career.

72. Captain Morgan rival BACARDI
The Bacardi company is still family-owned and operated, and is based in Hamilton, Bermuda. The company was founded in Santiago de Cuba and became successful by selling a refined form of rum, something new to a market that was used to a crude dark rum. The Bacardi family opposed the Castro regime as it came to power, so the company had to relocate to Bermuda.

The Captain Morgan brand of rum comes from Jamaica in the West Indies. It is named after the privateer from Wales, Sir Henry Morgan, who plied his trade in the Caribbean in the 17th century.

77. Iranian holy city QOM
Qom (also Qum) is a city in Iran located about 100 miles southwest of Tehran. Qom is a holy city in the Shi’a Islam tradition, and a pilgrimage destination.

78. Trigger rider ROGERS
Roy Rogers had a famous horse, a palomino named Trigger. When Rogers met up with Trigger, he was a “horse-for-rent” who appeared regularly in films. He was called Golden Cloud back then, and one of the horse’s roles was as the mount of Maid Marian, played by Olivia de Havilland in “The Adventures of Robin Hood”. After Rogers rode Golden Cloud in his first major movie, he bought him and renamed him Trigger.

80. Toon skunk Le Pew PEPE
Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe painted down her back accidently.

81. Anaheim team, in sportscasts HALOS
The Anaheim Angels are today more correctly called the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. The “Angels” name dates back to 1961 when the team was founded in the “City of Angels”, Los Angeles. When the franchise moved to Anaheim in 1965 they were known as the California Angels, then the Anaheim Angels, and most recently the Los Angeles Angels at Anaheim. The team’s angelic nickname is “the Halos”.

82. Frost lines? VERSE
The wonderful poet Robert Frost was a native of San Francisco, but lived most of life in New England. He also spent a few years in England, just before WWI. Frost was well recognized for his work during his lifetime, and received four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry. He was also Vermont’s first Poet Laureate, a position that he held from 1961 until his death in 1963.

83. Jungian principle ANIMA
The concept of anima and animus is found in the Carl Jung school of analytical psychology. The idea is that within each male there resides a feminine inner personality called the anima, and within each female there is a male inner personality known as the animus.

87. Cowboys quarterback Tony ROMO
Tony Romo is a quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Romo is also an avid amateur golfer and has even tried (albeit unsuccessfully) to qualify for the US Open golf championship.

88. Light-loving flier MOTH
It isn’t really understood why moths are attracted to artificial lights. There is one theory that sounds plausible to me though. It is suggested that moths navigate at night by maintaining the moon (the brightest celestial object) at a fixed angle. When a moth finds a brighter light source, like an artificial light, it gets confused.

92. Business magazine INC
“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

93. Monopoly token CAR
There are eight tokens included in the game of Monopoly as of 2013. These are the wheelbarrow, battleship, racecar, thimble, boot, Scottie dog, top hat and cat. The latest to be introduced was the cat in 2013, replacing the iron. The battleship and the cannon (aka howitzer, now retired) had been added to the Monopoly game as part of a recycling exercise. The pieces were intended for the game “Conflict” released in 1940, but when Parker Bros. pulled “Conflict” off the market due to poor sales, they added their excess battleships and cannons to Monopoly.

95. __ Fáil: Irish coronation stone LIA
The “Lia Fáil” is the coronation stone that is found on the Hill of Tara, the traditional seat of the High Kings of Ireland. “Lia Fáil” translates from Irish as “stone of destiny”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Gets hitched TAKES / THE PLUNGE
7. Unpopular party gal DEBBIE / DOWNER
13. Goes 0 for 20, say HITS / A SLUMP
18. Get some fresh air BREATHE
20. Complained RAILED
21. Drives unsteadily WEAVES
22. Give an edge to SHARPEN
23. Maestro Toscanini ARTURO
24. Half of a storybook duo HANSEL
25. Knocks in the theater PANS
26. Seafood entrée PRAWNS
28. Put an edge on WHET
30. Big Ten sch. PSU
31. “The Simpsons” disco guy STU
32. Director’s cry PLACES!
33. Already BY NOW
35. Growth period BOOM
36. Former South African president for whom a gold coin is named KRUGER
37. Caine captain QUEEG
38. Stopped lying? SAT UP
39. One may be personal TRAINER
41. Harold’s film partner KUMAR
42. Leading FIRST
43. Book intros PROLOGS
44. Wisecracks QUIPS
45. Pac-Man feature MAZE
46. Call it a night RETIRE
47. Salad veggies CUKES
48. How some Niagara stunts are done OVER THE / FALLS
52. Buttermilk rider EVANS
53. Bee output QUILT
54. Rains cats and dogs POURS
56. Zebra on a court REF
57. Link clicker’s destination SITE
58. Wax eloquent … and what to do to solve eight puzzle clues TURN A PHRASE
60. “The Clan of the Cave Bear” heroine AYLA
61. __-Cat SNO
62. Beauty’s admirer BEAST
63. Hardly seaworthy LEAKY
64. Divulge SPILL
67. Violin-playing comedian BENNY
68. Price-fixing bloc CARTEL
69. Spots to crash on the road INNS
70. Physics particle QUARK
71. They may be seconded MOTIONS
72. Hogties BINDS
74. __ willow PUSSY
75. “Now We Are Six” author AA MILNE
76. __ Sack HACKY
77. Extremely QUITE
78. Confrontations RUN-INS
79. Vanquishers of kings ACES
80. “Designing Women” actress Annie POTTS
81. Giving an edge to HONING
82. Large vessel VAT
85. Collar NAB
86. Staff note MEMO
87. Motley, as a crew RAGTAG
88. Options list MENU
89. Matured GREW UP
91. Ewan’s “Moulin Rouge!” co-star NICOLE
94. Fill with crayons COLOR IN
96. Commercial charge AD RATE
97. Charm ENAMOR
98. “I’m okay with that” SUITS ME

Down
1. Recipe amts. TBSPS
2. Buddhist who has attained Nirvana ARHAT
3. Reeves of “The Lake House” KEANU
4. Wave catchers? EARS
5. Indy letters STP
7. Bureau division DRAWER
8. Merits EARNS
9. Comic’s routines BITS
10. __-ray Disc BLU
11. Comparative suffix -IER
13. Cops HEAT
14. Creator of Q and M IAN
15. Plugs for tubes? TV SPOTS
16. Escorts to the door SEES OUT
19. Infuriates ENRAGES
21. “That was a close one!” WHEW!
27. Taiwan-based computer company ACER
29. Monopolize HOG
32. Group below abbots PRIORS
33. Removes from the schedule BUMPS
34. Affirmative votes YEAS
35. Having less coverage BARER
36. Tigers Hall of Fame outfielder Al KALINE
37. “Shh” QUIET PLEASE
38. Hat stats SIZES
39. Two-time U.S. Open champ TREVINO
40. __ cuff: shoulder muscles ROTATOR
41. One of Fran’s puppets KUKLA
42. Only NFL quarterback with more than 10,000 pass attempts FAVRE
43. Keep battling PRESS / FORWARD
44. “Jaws” shark hunter QUINT
45. Timid MOUSY
47. Junkyard dogs CURS
49. Fitting comment? TRY IT ON
50. Greek HELLENE
53. Campus areas QUADS
54. Popular frat activity PRANK
55. Like some chards OAKY
58. Shore fliers TERNS
59. Name of eight English kings HENRY
60. Typically wet times APRILS
62. Toss about, as ideas BANDY
64. Filling fully SATING
66. Flirtatious signals WINKS
67. Arrests BUSTS
68. More than breaking even COMING OUT / AHEAD
70. Pack it in QUIT
71. Rock band 10,000 __ MANIACS
72. Captain Morgan rival BACARDI
73. Emotionally cold type ICEBERG
74. Play a trick (on) PUT ONE / ACROSS
75. Close relative AUNT
76. Passenger’s direction at the corner HANG A / RIGHT
77. Iranian holy city QOM
78. Trigger rider ROGERS
80. Toon skunk Le Pew PEPE
81. Anaheim team, in sportscasts HALOS
82. Frost lines? VERSE
83. Jungian principle ANIMA
84. Pitched well? TUNED
86. Many a shelter resident MUTT
87. Cowboys quarterback Tony ROMO
88. Light-loving flier MOTH
90. Nursery noise WAH!
92. Business magazine INC
93. Monopoly token CAR
95. __ Fáil: Irish coronation stone LIA

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9 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Nov 15, Sunday”

  1. Was on the fence of whether or not I liked this quirky theme. I completely missed the second part – ie the vector component of the theme phrases. I guess I liked it then….maybe.

    Very interesting story about Tuscanini's career starter. Sounds like a movie waiting to happen.

    Best –

  2. Thanks for the nice write-up! I wanted to clue OVER THE FALLS as "Cute name for a Niagara cane shoppe?" but Rich didn't go for that……..

  3. @Bruce
    Thanks for stopping by! My favorite was DRAWER for Bureau division. That one made my head hurt.

    Why did Rich nix your clue for OVER THE FALLS? I don't think I would have gotten that one, but I would have liked it…

  4. @Jeff
    I imagine Rich thought it was too difficult. When you have a tricky gimmick like this you pretty much have to clue the theme entries a level easier than normal to give solvers a break…….At one point we had 76-Down clued as "Piper's protection"- (ie HANGAR)- we got confused on our own puzzle!

  5. Watching the Browns get pushed around by the Steelers and slowly filled in the grid. Really didn't have any problem with this puzzle, even though when I first saw the unnumbered blank squared I figured this was going to much tougher than it turned out to be.

    Hope everyone has a relaxing Sunday. See you all tomorrow.

  6. Yeah looking at the NYT puzzle myself now as I witnessed Peyton Manning's probably last game (5-20, 35 yards, 4 INT, 0 TDs scored by Denver while he was in), especially compared to what Osweiler did. As great as he was (he did set the career passing yards mark today, once held by FAVRE), it seems as many, he didn't know when to quit as to go out ahead. Kind of sad to see such a great player (likely) go out with such a bad game.

    Only thinking of this because of 42-Down, though I looked at those stats and Manning really doesn't have a chance of exceeding that stat (about 800 short or so).

    Onto more relaxing grids for Monday.

  7. A relatively easy puzzle, I thought, especially when compared to today's (syndicated) NYT puzzle, which I spent much more time on.

    Perhaps like "Chris in Texas", I think the clue "Play a trick (on)" calls for the phrase PUT ONE OVER rather than PUT ONE ACROSS. Maybe it's a regional idiom?

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