LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Nov 15, Saturday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Barry C. Silk
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Musical group founded by a Civil War vet BOSTON POPS
The marvelous Boston Pops orchestra specializes in playing light classical and popular music. The Boston Pops Orchestra grew out of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO), founded in 1885 by Henry Lee Higginson. Higginson instituted a series of performances by the BSO of lighter classics for the summer months, starting in 1885. These performances were originally known as the “Promenade Concerts”, and soon became year-round events. The name evolved into “Popular Concerts”, which was shortened to “Pops” and officially adopted in 1900.

Henry Lee Higginson was a businessman who was raised and lived in Boston. Higginson served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and fought at the First Battle of Bull Run and the Battle of Aldie. After the war, He made his fortune in his father’s brokerage business. Higginson is best known for founding the Boston Symphony Orchestra, in 1881, and then the Boston Pops Orchestra in 1885.

11. Some email attachments PDFS
Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

15. Symbol for the NFL’s Bears UPPER-CASE C
The Chicago Bears were founded in Decatur, Illinois in 1919 and moved to Chicago in 1921. The Bears are one of only two franchises in the NFL that were around at the time of the NFL’s founding (the other is the Arizona Cardinals, who were also based in Chicago in 1921).

16. 1970 Kinks hit LOLA
“Lola” is a fabulous song, written by Ray Davies and released by the Kinks back in 1970. Inspired by a real life incident, the lyrics tell of young man who met a young “lady” in a club, danced with her, and then discovered “she” was actually a transvestite. The storyline isn’t very traditional, but the music is superb.

17. School uniform part dating to the 1800s ETON COLLAR
An Eton collar is a wide, stiff, buttoned collar that is still part of the formal school uniform at Eton College near Windsor in England.

18. Presently ANON
“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

19. Strip lighting NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

20. Partly roasted treat S’MORE
S’mores are treats peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s’more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called “Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts”. Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

21. Consequences of too many blows TKOS
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can’t get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly “knocked out”. A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter’s safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

22. Wing it AD LIB
“Ad libitum” is a Latin phrase meaning “at one’s pleasure”. In common usage the phrase is usually shortened to “ad lib”. On the stage the concept of an “ad lib” is very familiar. For example, an actor may substitute his or her own words for forgotten lines using an ad lib, or a director may instruct an actor to use his or her own words at a particular point in a performance to promote a sense of spontaneity.

“To wing it” is to improvise, to do something with sufficient preparation. There is some debate about the terms etymology, but I like the idea that it came from the theater. An actor would be described as “winging it” if he or she learned lines while standing in the wings just before going on stage.

26. Big name in investment banking SACHS
The investment banking firm of Goldman Sachs was founded in New York in 1869 by Marcus Goldman. Samuel Sachs joined the firm in 1882, the same year that he married Louisa Goldman, Marcus’s daughter. The name “Goldman Sachs” was adopted by the firm in 1885. Goldman Sachs made out like bandits during the subprime mortgage crisis of 2007-08 as the company actually short-sold subprime mortgage bonds. As the price of the bonds nose-dived, Goldman Sachs made huge profits.

30. King of pop CAROLE
Carole King is a marvelous singer-songwriter from Manhattan, New York. King started her career writing a string of hit songs with her partner and eventual husband Gerry Goffin (although they later divorced). King’s first composition to get to number one was “Will You Love Me Tomorrow”, which she wrote at 18 years of age for the Shirelles. Not so long ago, my wife and I saw the stage musical “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical”, which tells the story of King’s music and life. I highly recommend “Beautiful” …

31. IRA components CDS
A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

34. Complex pipes HOOKAHS
A hookah is a waterpipe, a device for smoking tobacco in which the smoke is passed through a water basin before it is inhaled.

37. Civil Rights Memorial architect LIN
The Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama remembers forty people who died over the years in the struggle for equal rights between the years 1954 (the year of the Brown v. Board of Education decision) and 1968 (the year Martin Luther King was assassinated). The memorial was designed by Maya Lin, whose most famous work is the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial in Washington, D.C.

38. Tahrir Square city CAIRO
Cairo is the capital city of Egypt. It is the largest city on the continent of Africa and is nicknamed “The City of a Thousand Minarets” because of its impressive skyline replete with Islamic architecture. The name “Cairo” is a European corruption of the city’s original name in Arabic, “Al-Qahira”.

Tahrir Square is a major location in Cairo, Egypt. The name “Tahrir” translates to “Liberation” in English. The square was a focal point in the 2011 Egyptian Revolution staged against former president Hosni Mubarak.

39. 1979 Pa. newsmaker TMI
The Three Mile Island (TMI) accident was a meltdown of a reactor core that took place at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station just outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1979. The accident was caused by a mechanical failure, compounded by human error.

40. Altar on high ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for “altar”.

41. “Happening Now” airer FOX NEWS
The Fox News Channel was launched in 1996 by Australian media mogul Rupert Murdoch. According to Nielsen statistics, Fox now attracts more viewers than any other cable news channel. Also according to Nielsen, the median viewer of Fox News is over the age of 65.

43. Lotion letters SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

46. Peabody Essex Museum city SALEM
The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts is considered by many to be one of the oldest continually-operating museums in the country. Although the PEM was only founded in 1992, it has its roots in the East India Marine Society founded way back in 1799.

48. Course outlines SYLLABI
“Syllabus” is the Latin word for “list”.

50. Seat of Greene County, Ohio XENIA
Xenia, Ohio is in effect a suburb of Dayton. The name “Xenia” is the Greek word for “hospitality”. In terms of population, Xenia is the largest city in the US with a name beginning with the letter X.

61. Like emus AUSTRALIAN
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an “Emu War” in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the “invading force”. The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of “war”, the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

65. Red Rose PETE
Pete Rose was a talented baseball player who holds the record for all-time Major League hits. In recent years of course his reputation has been tarnished by admissions that he bet on games in which he played and managed.

Down
1. Lake __ Vista BUENA
Lake Buena Vista is the Florida city that is home to Walt Disney World. The city takes its name from Buena Vista Street in Burbank, California, which is home to Disney’s main studio.

5. Tolkien monster ORC
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

6. Base figs. NCOS
An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

7. Where to get a date PALM
Date palms can be either male or female. Only the female tree bears fruit.

8. Vigeland Museum city OSLO
The Vigeland Museum in Oslo is named for sculptor Gustav Vigeland, who donated his body of works to the city at the time of his death. The museum was built as a workshop for Vigeland during his lifetime, in return for the pledge to donate his works. Work on the atelier started in 1921, Vegeland died in 1943, and the museum opened in 1947.

10. Predator known for its piercing call SCREECH OWL
There are over twenty species of screech owls, all of which are native to the Americas. Named for their eerie trill heard mainly during the night, screech owls are about the size of a pint glass.

12. Five-time 1960s Emmy-winning actor DON KNOTTS
Don Knotts was a comedic actor who played two major roles on television: Barney Fife on “The Andy Griffith Show” in the sixties, and Ralph Furley on “Three’s Company” in the seventies and eighties. Knotts appeared with child actor Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”, and in fact the two are sixth cousins.

14. Literally, “without lines” SANS-SERIF
Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif, using the French word “sans” meaning “without” and “serif” from the Dutch “schreef” meaning “line”. Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I’m not so sure though …

27. Florida surfing mecca COCOA BEACH
The coastal town of Cocoa Beach in Florida was known as Oceanus until the name was changed in 1925. The contemporary name comes from the nearby city of Cocoa that was chartered in 1895. Cocoa Beach’s economy has depended on NASA since the sixties, as the John F. Kennedy Space Center is located 15 miles north of the town. Cocoa Beach was also the setting for “I Dream of Jeannie”, although no filming was done locally.

32. Traditional Cajun dish DIRTY RICE
“Dirty rice” is a white rice made to look “dirty” by cooking it with chicken liver, green peppers, celery and onion, as well as cayenne and black pepper. Dirty rice is a traditional Cajun dish.

41. Rx overseer FDA
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) started out as the Food, Drug and Insecticide organization in 1906, after President Theodore Roosevelt signed into law the Food and Drug Act. The main driver behind the Act was concern over public hygiene.

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

42. “I can remember when the air was clean and __ was dirty”: George Burns SEX
George Burns was the stage name of comedian and actor Nathan Birnbaum. Famously, Burns was married to Gracie Allen, who initially acted as “straight man” in their double act. The duo found that they got more laughs with Gracie acting as “Dumb Dora”, an arrangement that Burns and Allen stuck to for decades.

45. Ethylene, for one ALKENE
An alkene is an organic compound made up of carbon and hydrogen atoms. It differs from an alkane in that it has at least one C=C double bond. The simplest alkene is the gas ethylene, a major raw material used in the manufacture of plastics (like polyethylene).

47. Legendary speller? MERLIN
Merlin is a figure of legend, most famous as the wizard in the stories of King Arthur.

51. Dark times abroad NUITS
In French, the “soir” (evening) leads into the “nuit” (night).

52. Novelist Calvino ITALO
As well as being an author, Italo Calvino was a famous Italian journalist. He was a supporter of communism and so wasn’t very popular in the US nor in Britain.

53. Longtime Moore co-star ASNER
Ed Asner is most famous for playing the irascible but lovable Lou Grant on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and on the spin-off drama “Lou Grant”. Off-screen, Asner is noted for his political activism. He served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and was very involved in the 1980 SAG strike. When “Lou Grant” was cancelled in 1982, despite decent ratings, there was a lot of talk that the cancellation was a move by the network against Asner personally. In fact one of Asner’s activist colleagues, Howard Hesseman (who played Johnny Fever), found that his show “WKRP in Cincinnati” was also canceled … on the very same day.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Musical group founded by a Civil War vet BOSTON POPS
11. Some email attachments PDFS
15. Symbol for the NFL’s Bears UPPER-CASE C
16. 1970 Kinks hit LOLA
17. School uniform part dating to the 1800s ETON COLLAR
18. Presently ANON
19. Strip lighting NEON
20. Partly roasted treat S’MORE
21. Consequences of too many blows TKOS
22. Wing it AD LIB
24. Larger-than-life types LEGENDS
26. Big name in investment banking SACHS
30. King of pop CAROLE
31. IRA components CDS
34. Complex pipes HOOKAHS
36. Pitch TAR
37. Civil Rights Memorial architect LIN
38. Tahrir Square city CAIRO
39. 1979 Pa. newsmaker TMI
40. Altar on high ARA
41. “Happening Now” airer FOX NEWS
43. Lotion letters SPF
44. Italian road STRADA
46. Peabody Essex Museum city SALEM
48. Course outlines SYLLABI
50. Seat of Greene County, Ohio XENIA
54. Long haul TREK
55. Do away with ERASE
59. Low spots RUTS
60. Taunt RIDE
61. Like emus AUSTRALIAN
63. Positive assertion I CAN
64. Ownership issue CLEAR TITLE
65. Red Rose PETE
66. Home safety feature HEAT SENSOR

Down
1. Lake __ Vista BUENA
2. Didn’t sit around OPTED
3. String holder SPOOL
4. __ elbow TENNIS
5. Tolkien monster ORC
6. Base figs. NCOS
7. Where to get a date PALM
8. Vigeland Museum city OSLO
9. Bit of wisdom PEARL
10. Predator known for its piercing call SCREECH OWL
11. Certain metalworker PLATER
12. Five-time 1960s Emmy-winning actor DON KNOTTS
13. Outdoor security item FLOOD LAMP
14. Literally, “without lines” SANS-SERIF
23. Crotchety remark BAH!
25. Atmosphere makeup GAS
27. Florida surfing mecca COCOA BEACH
28. Fake HOAX
29. Potato __ SKINS
31. Museum visit, perhaps CLASS TRIP
32. Traditional Cajun dish DIRTY RICE
33. Warned, in a way SNARLED AT
35. Neighborhood AREA
41. Rx overseer FDA
42. “I can remember when the air was clean and __ was dirty”: George Burns SEX
45. Ethylene, for one ALKENE
47. Legendary speller? MERLIN
49. Cry of domination I RULE!
51. Dark times abroad NUITS
52. Novelist Calvino ITALO
53. Longtime Moore co-star ASNER
56. Completely lost ASEA
57. Fantasy player’s concern STAT
58. Stumbles, say ERRS
62. Bolted down ATE

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9 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Nov 15, Saturday”

  1. DNF, really couldn't grab enough on this one to get started. Then had to look up some wrong guesses, and still didn't have enough to finish. How this one goes, I suppose. Onward to Sunday, I guess (it's a "ladder" one, interesting from the LA Times).

  2. "Rx" is short for the Latin "recipe" (as in cookbook recipes)- and means "Take…". It comes from bygone days when doctors wrote long (and usually illegible) prescriptions instructing the pharmacist to take a medley of (often useless) substances to make up the therapeutic concoction. The longer the list, the more impressed was the patient. As a third year medical student in 1961 I still studied the last remnants of this fast disappearing practice during our pharmacology course; nowadays it's rare to see a pharmacist actually making up a prescription – he or she is much more concerned with the host of computerized interaction riders that (literally and figuratively) tax harried physicians and pharmacists as they respectively write (or should I say type?) and fill prescriptions for the increasingly expensive made-up drugs manufactured by the pharmaceutical industry. (As an aside, physicians when writing their notes often analogously abbreviate "diagnosis" to "Dx" and "surgery" to "Sx")

  3. As usual I was 2 or 3 lookups from finishing a Saturday puzzle. I won a lot of battles in this puzzle but ultimately lost the war. As my old math teacher used to say about solving prolems, "if it's not completely right, it's completely wrong.." Unfortunately the same goes for crosswords.

    Saw "Happening Now" 41A and thought of the old Flip Wilson show and his classic Church of What's Happening Now skits where he was the con man Reverand Leroy. One of my favorite shows as a kid.

    @Raymond
    Interesting stuff on the Xx notations in medicine. It makes sense for Rx. In Spanish "receta" means both a recipe as well as a prescription. Would Kx denote a kickback on a prescription? 🙂

    Best –

  4. A clean week of solving. That only means that next week will pummel me relentlessly – no doubt! My only bobble with this grid was thinking it was I.M. Pei who the architect for the Civil Rights Memorial…which tripped me up until I figured out it was Lin who did this memorial too

    Hope all of my CWP loving friends out there have a good Saturday. I'll be back here tomorrow for the Sunday grid.

  5. I think this is only the second time that I've finished a
    Saturday puzzle and got all the answers.
    Either Barry Silk has gotten kinder or I'm improving.
    ETON jacket at first. TMI was my answer, but didn't know it was Three Mile Island.
    DON KNOTTS and FLOOD LAMP were last to fall.
    49D….I RULE!

  6. Will the person who has stolen Barry Silk's identity please give it back? There's no way he wrote such an easy grid. :12 for me.

    I remember Three Mile Island. That, Lake Erie Catching fire and the Love Canal all happened in quick order. Combine that with the relocation of everyone in Times Beach, MO and that was about this country's environmental nadir.

    Speaking of radiation, there's a great doco on the Chernobyl disaster, and how close Europe came to being uninhabitable. http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-battle-of-chernobyl/

  7. @Tony Michaels, Thanks!

    But Willie D thinks it was too easy for Barry Silk.
    @ Willie D, You did the puzzle in 12 minutes?

  8. Pookie, nicely done,and you too Tony! This one seemed as challenging as any Saturday, altho I can't really say because I ALWAYS cheat on Saturdays.
    I found it weird to have the Three Mile Island accident reduced to the initials TMI. It was one of the answers I actually knew, but I didn't like writing it.
    Sunday will be better! Onward!
    Be well~~™

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