LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Nov 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Pam Amick Klawitter
THEME: Forced Re-entry … today’s themed answers are all common phrases, but with a “ree” sound added to the end of one word:

23A. Forgetting to put the milk in the fridge? GROCERY NEGLIGENCE (from “gross negligence”)
51A. Backdrop for a gangster film? CRIME SCENERY (from “crime scene”)
83A. Warning sign for an art dealer? FORGERY AHEAD (from “forge ahead”)
111A. Ultra-safe garment room? BULLETPROOF VESTRY (from “bulletproof vest”)
16D. A little Egyptian magic? SORCERY OF THE NILE (from “source of the Nile”)
37D. Well-designed room for a tot? PRACTICAL NURSERY (from “practical nurse”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Italian seaport BARI
Bari is a major port city on the Adriatic coast of Italy. Bari has the unfortunate distinction of being the only city in Europe to experience chemical warfare during WWII. Allied stores of mustard gas were released during a German bombing raid on Bari in 1943. Fatalities caused by the chemical agent were reported as 69, although other reports list the number as maybe a thousand military personnel and a thousand civilians.

5. Lupone on Broadway PATTI
The singer Patti LuPone won Tonys for playing Eva Peron in “Evita ” and Rose in “Gypsy”.

10. Alligator relative CAIMAN
Caimans are relatively small, crocodile-like reptiles that inhabit Central and South America. That said, the largest species can grow to 13 feet in length, but many are about 3 feet long.

16. Old boomer SST
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Famously, the Concorde routinely broke the sound barrier, and cruised at about twice the speed of sound. Above Mach 2, frictional heat would cause the plane’s aluminum airframe to soften, so airspeed was limited.

20. Like most people ASIAN
Most of the world’s population lives in Asia (60%), and Asia is the largest continent in terms of landmass (30% of the world). Asia also has the highest population density (246 people per square mile), and the most populous city on the continent is Shanghai, China.

21. Shout from Speedy Gonzales ANDALE!
When I was a kid, Speedy Gonzales was one of my favorite cartoon characters. He was billed as “The Fastest Mouse in all Mexico” and tore around the place yelling “¡Ándale! ¡Ándale! ¡Arriba! ¡Arriba! ¡Epa¡ ¡Epa! ¡Epa! Yeehaw!”

22. “… the native hue of resolution / Is sicklied __ with the pale cast of thought”: Hamlet O’ER

And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought

That above are two lines from Hamlet’s famous “To be or not to be” soliloquy.

To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous fortune;
Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles …

There has been centuries of debate about how one interprets Hamlet’s soliloquy that begins “To be or not to be …”. My favorite opinion is that Hamlet is weighing up the pros and cons of suicide (“to not be”).

27. Flights connect them STORIES
Flights of stairs connect stories in a building.

28. Country rocker Steve EARLE
Steve Earle is an American songwriter and performer, with a reputation as a man who has lived a hard life. Earle’s brushes with the law and drug addiction problems have earned him the nickname “the hardcore troubadour”.

29. Actress Dash STACEY
Stacey Dash is an actress from the Bronx, New York. Dash is best known for playing one of the lead roles in the 1995 movie “Clueless”, as well as in the TV spinoff series also called “Clueless”.

34. Pieces of pizza in Plymouth? ZEDS
Two pieces (letters) of the word pizza are the letter Z (zee), which is referred to as the letter “zed” in Plymouth, England.

The letter named “zed” has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of “zee” used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

Plymouth is a port city on the coast of Devon in the UK. Plymouth was the point of departure of the Mayflower Pilgrims.

38. “Arbitrage” star GERE
Richard Gere has played such great roles on the screen, and I find him to be a very interesting character off the screen. Gere has been studying Buddhism since 1978 and is a very visible supporter of the Dalai Lama and the people of Tibet.

“Arbitrage” is an entertaining drama released in 2012 that stars Richard Gere and Susan Sarandon, two favorite actors of mine. Gere plays a none-too-honest hedge fund manager who gets himself into a lot of trouble.

42. “Catch-22” pal of Yossarian ORR
Orr has no other name, just “Orr”, in Joseph Heller’s novel “Catch 22”.

Captain John Yossarian is the protagonist in Joseph Heller’s novel “Catch 22”. Yossarian’s story is based on the author’s own experiences when stationed in Italy during World War II.

“Catch-22” is a novel by Joseph Heller set during WWII. The title refers to absurd bureaucratic constraints that soldiers had to suffer. Heller’s “Catch 22” was invoked by an army psychiatrist to explain that any pilot requesting to be evaluated for insanity, to avoid flying dangerous missions, had to be sane as only a sane man would try to get out of such missions. The term “catch-22 has entered the language and describes a paradoxical situation from which one can’t escape due to contradictory rules; one loses, no matter what choice one makes.

43. Between, in Bordeaux ENTRE
Bordeaux is perhaps the wine-production capital of the world. Wine has been produced in the area since the eighth century. Bordeaux has an administrative history too. During WWII, the French government relocated from Paris to the port city of Bordeaux when it became clear that Paris was soon to fall to the Germans. After the German’s took France, the capital was famously moved to Vichy.

49. Omani money RIAL
The rial is the currency of Oman (as well as that of Yemen , Iran, Cambodia and Tunisia!).

60. Some PX patrons PFCS
Private First Class (PFC)

A PX is a Post Exchange, a retail store operating on a US Army Base. The equivalent store on an Air Force Base is called a Base Exchange (BX). At a Navy installation it’s a Navy Exchange (NEX), at a Marine Corps installation it’s a Marine Corps Exchange (MCX) and at a Coast Guard Installation it’s a CGX.

73. “The Beverly Hillbillies” dad JED
The actor Buddy Ebsen is best known for playing Jed Clampett in television’s “The Beverly Hillbillies”, as wells the title character on the seventies detective series “Barnaby Jones”. Ebsen had been cast in the role of the Tin Man in the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, but he developed an allergy to the aluminium dust that was used in the makeup. He ended up in hospital and had to walk away from the part. Ebsen blamed “The Wizard of Oz” on persistent problems that he had with his lungs in subsequent years. But Ebsen lived 16 years longer that any of the other major cast members of the film, so maybe he got the last laugh!

“The Beverly Hillbillies” was a rags-to-riches sitcom that aired from 1962 to 1971, a creation of writer Paul Henning. Buoyed by the success of “Hillbillies”, Henning created another sitcom in 1965, one that was a complete opposite in terms of plot, the riches-to-rags story of “Green Acres”.

74. Blood-filtering organs SPLEENS
The spleen has a couple of functions in the human body. It removes old red blood cells, and recycles the iron contained therein. The waste product of this recycling is bile. It also holds a reserve of blood that can be released when necessary (if the body goes into “circulatory shock”). Greek and Roman physicians ascribed to the theory that the body had four basic substances, the so-called four humors. All diseases were caused by these four substances getting out of balance. The four humors were:

– Black bile (melancolia)
– Yellow bile (cholera)
– Phlegm (phlegma)
– Blood (sanguis)

82. NBC weekend fixture SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

85. In __: unmoved SITU
“In situ” is a Latin phrase meaning “in the place”, and we use the term to mean “in the original position”.

88. Auditing giant __ & Young ERNST
Ernst & Young is one of the Big Four accountancy firms, alongside Deloitte, KPMG and PricewaterhouseCoopers. Ernst & Young is headquartered in London.

91. Credit __: Zurich-based financial group SUISSE
Credit Suisse is a financial services company that is headquartered in Zurich. It was founded in 1856 by Alfred Escher, with the intent providing funds for the Switzerland’s railroad system.

92. Razor brand ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

94. Wiesbaden wheels OPELS
Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we’d say “estate car” in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

Wiesbaden is the capital city of the federal state of Hesse in southwestern Germany. Wiesbaden is one of the oldest spa towns in Europe, and its name translates literally to “meadow baths”.

97. Honeymoon options SAFARIS
“Safari” is a Swahili word, meaning “journey” or “expedition”.

101. Islamic branch SHIA
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

103. Mary Hartman portrayer Louise LASSER
“Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman” is a TV show that aired in the mid-seventies. It was produced by Norman Lear and is a parody on soap operas. Actress Louise Lasser played the title role. Lasser was married to Woody Allen at the time the show was originally broadcast.

106. Desi’s daughter LUCIE
The actress and singer Lucie Arnaz is the daughter of Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. Arnaz started acting at an early age, appearing frequently on her mother’s television show “Here’s Lucy”. Lucie’s most famous appearance on the big screen was opposite Neil Diamond in 1980’s “The Jazz Singer”.

107. Players with masks GOALIES
Hockey goalkeepers wear protective masks.

110. Keats’ “__ to Psyche” ODE
The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

111. Ultra-safe garment room? BULLETPROOF VESTRY (from “bulletproof vest”)
A vestry is where a priest dresses for services. Like so many English words, “vestry” came into our language via Anglo-Norman, from the Latin “vestarium” meaning “wardrobe”.

116. Panini cheese ASIAGO
Asiago is a crumbly cheese, named after the region in northeastern Italy from where it originates.

In Italy, a sandwich made from sliced bread is called a “tramezzino”, while sandwiches made from non-sliced breads are called “panini” (singular “panino”). We’ve imported the term “panini” into English to mean a pressed and toasted sandwich.

117. Skateboarding leap OLLIE
An “ollie” is a skateboarding trick invented in 1976 by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. Apparently it’s a way of lifting the board off the ground, while standing on it, without touching the board with one’s hands. Yeah, I could do that …

119. Round Table knight KAY
According to Arthurian legend, Sir Kay was one of the first Knights of the Round Table. He was also King Arthur’s foster brother. Over time, Sir Kay came to be described as a boor and bully, having started out as valiant warrior.

King Arthur (and his Round Table) probably never really existed, but his legend is very persistent. Arthur was supposedly a leader of the Romano-British as they tried to resist the invasion of the Anglo-Saxons in the late 5th and early 6th centuries.

120. Trojan War sage NESTOR
A nestor is a wise old man, named for Nestor, the sage who gives counsel in Homer’s “Iliad”.

122. Bread often served with ghee NAAN
Naan (also “nan”) bread is very popular in Indian restaurants, as well as in other West, Central and South Asian cuisines. Indian Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

Ghee is clarified butter used in South Asian cuisines.

Down
2. Car loan nos. APRS
Annual percentage rate (APR)

5. Métro home PARIS
The Paris Métro is the busiest underground transportation system in western Europe, carrying about 4.5 million passengers a day, about the same as the New York City Subway. The system took its name from the company that originally operated it, namely “La Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris”, which was shorted to “Métro”. The term “Metro” was then adopted for similar systems in cities all over the world.

7. Spam holders TINS
Spam is a precooked meat product that is sold in cans. It was introduced by Hormel Foods in 1937. The main meat ingredients are pork shoulder meat and ham. The name “Spam” was chosen as the result of a competition at Hormel, with the winner earning himself a hundred dollars. According to the company, the derivation of the name “Spam” is a secret known by only a few former executives, but the speculation is that it stands for “spiced ham” or “shoulders of pork and ham”.

8. The Wizard of Menlo Park, initially TAE
Thomas Alva Edison (TAE) was nicknamed “The Wizard of Menlo Park” by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

10. Stone memorial CAIRN
A cairn is a man-made pile of stones that can have various uses. A cairn might be a prosaic trail marker, or a distinctive landmark or monument. Our term “cairn” derives from the Gaelic “carn” meaning “rocky hill, heap of stones”.

12. Brest brainstorms IDEES
In French, one’s head (tête) might produce an idea (idée).

14. World Series qualifier: Abbr. ALCS
American League Championship Series (ALCS)

15. Hair removal choice NEET
The hair removal product “Neet” was launched in Canada in 1901, and was also sold as “Immac”. Today it is sold under the name “Veet”.

16. A little Egyptian magic? SORCERY OF THE NILE (from “source of the Nile”)
Africa’s River Nile has two main tributaries, the Blue Nile and White Nile, with the White Nile deemed to be the headwaters of the Nile itself. The most distant source of the White Nile is unknown, so I suppose one might argue that the “source of the Nile” is a mystery.

25. Work on the docks LADE
The verb “lade” meaning “to load” comes from an Old English word “hladan”. Lade also used to mean “to draw water” and indeed gave us our word “ladle”. So “lade” and “ladle” are close cousins.

30. Mer shade AZUR
The word “azure” came into English from Persian via Old French. The French word “l’azur” was taken from the Persian name for a place in northeastern Afghanistan called “Lazhward” which was the main source of the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli. The stone has a vivid blue color, and “azure” has been describing this color since the 14th century.

“Mer” is the French word for “sea”.

33. Seine sun SOLEIL
The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

35. “It Wasn’t All Velvet” memoirist TORME
Mel Tormé was a jazz singer, with a quality of voice that earned him the nickname “The Velvet Fog”. Tormé also wrote a few books, and did a lot of acting. He was the co-author of the Christmas classic known as “The Christmas Song”, which starts out with the line “Chestnuts roasting on an open fire …”

36. Suffix with Unit -ARIAN
Central to the Christian theological tradition of Unitarianism is the principle that God is one entity, as opposed to Trinitarianism that defines God as three person in one, a trinity.

40. Twain contemporary HARTE
Bret Harte was a storyteller noted for his tales of the American West, even though he himself was from back East, born in Albany, New York. One work attributed to him is “Ah Sin”, a disastrously unsuccessful play written by Bret Harte and Mark Twain. The two writers didn’t get on at all well during the writing process, and when the play was produced for the stage it was very poorly received. Nevertheless, Twain suggested a further collaboration with Harte, and Harte downright refused!

44. Boot camp VIPs NCOS
An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

45. Word with turkey or fox TROT
The turkey trot is a dance step that was popular in the early 1900s, often performed to ragtime music. It was a dance denounced by the Vatican, as some of the positions assumed were deemed suggestive and offensive.

Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-wife team of ballroom dancers who regularly performed on Broadway at the start of the 20th century. The Castles have been credited with creating or at least popularizing the dance called the “foxtrot”.

50. Posse members LAWMEN
Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

52. Periodical with a URL E-MAG
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

53. Early rock horn SAX
The saxophone was invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax’s grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

56. “Four Quartets” monogram TSE
T. S. Eliot was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948, largely due to his “Four Quartets”, a set of four poems that Eliot himself considered to be his life’s masterpiece.

58. Big name in morning talk RIPA
When Kelly Ripa secured the co-host spot on morning television with Regis Philbin, she was still acting in “All My Children” in a role she had been playing for over ten years. After a year of holding down two jobs, she eventually gave up the acting job.

60. Leisurely walks PASEOS
A paseo is a slow stroll or walk taken outdoors. The term comes from the Spanish “pasear” meaning “to take a stroll”.

62. Parsons’ places MANSES
A manse is a minister’s home in various Christian traditions. “Manse” derives from “mansus”, the Latin for “dwelling”. The term can also be used for any stately residence.

64. Sadie Hawkins Day suitors GALS
Sadie Hawkins was a character in Al Capp’s comic strip “Li’l Abner”. Sadie was still a spinster at the age of 35 so declared a “Sadie Hawkins Day” in which she chased the local men in a footrace, with marriage as the prize when one was caught.

66. Supermodel Cheryl TIEGS
Cheryl Tiegs was only 17-years-old when she appeared as a model on the cover of “Glamour” magazine. After that Tiegs became famous for sequential appearances in the “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue” throughout the seventies.

67. Testing stage BETA
In the world of software development, the first tested issue of a new program is usually called the “alpha” version. Expected to have a lot of bugs that need to be fixed, the alpha release is usually distributed to a small number of testers. After reported bugs have been eliminated, the refined version is called a “beta” and is released to a wider audience, but with the program clearly labeled as “beta”. The users generally check functionality and report further bugs that are encountered. The beta version feeds into a release candidate, the version that is tested just prior to the software being sold into the market, bug-free. Yeah, right …

69. Meditation sounds OMS
“Om” is a sacred mystic word from the Hindu tradition. “Om” is sometimes used as a mantra, a focus for the mind in meditation.

70. Reims rejection NON
“Oui” is “yes” in French, and “non” is “no”.

The city of Reims is the de facto capital of the Champagne region of France, being the biggest city in the area. Reims was badly damaged during both world wars, including extensive damage to the much loved cathedral during WWI by German bombardment. It’s perhaps fitting that Reims was the location where the German forces surrendered to General Eisenhower on the 7 May 1945, ending the war in Europe.

71. Suffolk slammers GAOLS
Both “jail” and “gaol” are pronounced the same way, mean the same thing and are rooted in the same Latin word for “cave”. The spelling “gaol” is seen quite often in the UK, although it is gradually being replaced with “jail”. The “gaol” spelling has Norman roots and tends to be used in Britain in more formal documentation.

Suffolk is a county on the east coast of England that is home to Felixstowe, which is one of the largest container ports in Europe. Suffolk lies just south of the county of Norfolk. Back in the day, the “north folk” lived in “Norfolk” and the “south folk” lived in Suffolk.

74. John in Dublin SEAN
The name “John” translates into Irish as “Seán”.

81. Hospital fluids SERA
Blood serum is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell or a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to some disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

83. Some NFL ball carriers FBS
Fullback (FB)

89. Fabric often decorated with pastoral scenes TOILE
Toile fabric can be used as upholstery, or as a wallpaper, or even as a fabric for clothing.

91. Arenas STADIA
The Greek word “stadion” was a measure of length, about 600 feet. The name “stadion” then came to be used for a running track of that length. That “running track” meaning became our contemporary word “stadium”.

93. Steering apparatus part TIE ROD
Tie rods are part of a rack-and-pinion steering mechanism in a car. On the other side of the Atlantic they are referred to as “track rods”.

95. Pal PAISAN
“Paisan” is Italian for “brother, fellow countryman”.

96. Potter’s made him invisible CLOAK
In the J.K. Rowling series of novels, Harry Potter used a Cloak of Invisibility that was passed down to him by his father.

99. En __: on a streak, in sports slang FUEGO
A sports player who is doing really well might be said to be “on fire”. Sometimes “on fire” is translated into Spanish and the person is said to be “en fuego”.

101. Balkan capital SOFIA
Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria. Natives pronounce the name “Sofia” with the emphasis on the “o”, while the rest of us tend to stress the “i”. Bulgarians do agree with us though when it comes to the girl’s name “Sofia”, then they stress the “i” like we do!

104. “Voice of Israel” author EBAN
Abba Eban was an Israeli diplomat and politician, born Aubrey Solomon Meir Eban in Cape Town, South Africa. While working at the United Nations after WWII, Eban changed his given name to “Abba”, the Hebrew word for “father”. He made this change as reportedly as he could see himself as the father of the nation of Israel.

107. Olympian’s prize GOLD
In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

108. Italian hot spot ETNA
Mt. Etna is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Mt Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. The third of Italy’s famous volcanoes is Stromboli.

109. Miss, overseas: Abbr. SRTA
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

112. Fleur-de-__ LIS
“Lys” (also “lis”) is the French word for “lily”, as in “fleur-de-lys”, the heraldic symbol often associated with the French monarchy.

113. Ending with pay -OLA
“Payola” is the illegal practice of paying radio stations or disk jockeys to repeatedly play a particular piece of music. The impetus behind the crime is that the more often a song is played, the more likely it is to sell. The term “payola” comes from the words “pay” and “Victrola”, an RCA brand name for an early phonograph.

114. Yang counterpart YIN
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Italian seaport BARI
5. Lupone on Broadway PATTI
10. Alligator relative CAIMAN
16. Old boomer SST
19. Conversant with UP ON
20. Like most people ASIAN
21. Shout from Speedy Gonzales ANDALE!
22. “… the native hue of resolution / Is sicklied __ with the pale cast of thought”: Hamlet O’ER
23. Forgetting to put the milk in the fridge? GROCERY NEGLIGENCE (from “gross negligence”)
26. HDTV brand RCA
27. Flights connect them STORIES
28. Country rocker Steve EARLE
29. Actress Dash STACEY
31. Sail support MAST
32. Blue state SADNESS
34. Pieces of pizza in Plymouth? ZEDS
35. Secures, as a package TAPES
38. “Arbitrage” star GERE
39. Words from the unconvinced OH SURE
42. “Catch-22” pal of Yossarian ORR
43. Between, in Bordeaux ENTRE
46. Religious zeal IDOLATRY
49. Omani money RIAL
51. Backdrop for a gangster film? CRIME SCENERY (from “crime scene”)
54. __ bran OAT
57. Treat made with ground almonds MACAROON
59. Succeeds MAKES IT
60. Some PX patrons PFCS
61. Braids, e.g. ENTWIST
62. Top (out) MAX
63. Agent DELEGATEE
65. Rascally sort IMP
66. Price place TAG
67. Jump in the pool, perhaps? BET
68. Durable wood ASH
69. Another time ONCE AGAIN
73. “The Beverly Hillbillies” dad JED
74. Blood-filtering organs SPLEENS
78. Sound of the wind, perhaps MOAN
79. Skin blemish AGE SPOT
81. Working for Christmas, say SEASONAL
82. NBC weekend fixture SNL
83. Warning sign for an art dealer? FORGERY AHEAD (from “forge ahead”)
85. In __: unmoved SITU
86. French royalty NOBLESSE
88. Auditing giant __ & Young ERNST
90. Delay LAG
91. Credit __: Zurich-based financial group SUISSE
92. Razor brand ATRA
94. Wiesbaden wheels OPELS
96. PC key CTRL
97. Honeymoon options SAFARIS
101. Islamic branch SHIA
103. Mary Hartman portrayer Louise LASSER
106. Desi’s daughter LUCIE
107. Players with masks GOALIES
110. Keats’ “__ to Psyche” ODE
111. Ultra-safe garment room? BULLETPROOF VESTRY (from “bulletproof vest”)
115. Flat filler AIR
116. Panini cheese ASIAGO
117. Skateboarding leap OLLIE
118. Pro foe ANTI
119. Round Table knight KAY
120. Trojan War sage NESTOR
121. Pops, to tots DADAS
122. Bread often served with ghee NAAN

Down
1. Spy’s favorite plant? BUG
2. Car loan nos. APRS
3. Cheer ROOT
4. It’s often personal INCOME
5. Métro home PARIS
6. So far AS YET
7. Spam holders TINS
8. The Wizard of Menlo Park, initially TAE
9. Ready to roll IN GEAR
10. Stone memorial CAIRN
11. Right __ ANGLE
12. Brest brainstorms IDEES
13. Part of many superhero names MAN
14. World Series qualifier: Abbr. ALCS
15. Hair removal choice NEET
16. A little Egyptian magic? SORCERY OF THE NILE (from “source of the Nile”)
17. Break away SECEDE
18. Cube holders TRAYS
24. Clean the slate ERASE
25. Work on the docks LADE
30. Mer shade AZUR
32. Come across as SEEM
33. Seine sun SOLEIL
35. “It Wasn’t All Velvet” memoirist TORME
36. Suffix with Unit -ARIAN
37. Well-designed room for a tot? PRACTICAL NURSERY (from “practical nurse”)
38. It might be silly GRIN
40. Twain contemporary HARTE
41. Disorderly digs STY
44. Boot camp VIPs NCOS
45. Word with turkey or fox TROT
46. “That’s disgusting!” ICK!
47. Formally turned over, as land DEEDED
48. Beginning ONSET
50. Posse members LAWMEN
52. Periodical with a URL E-MAG
53. Early rock horn SAX
55. Pro ACE
56. “Four Quartets” monogram TSE
58. Big name in morning talk RIPA
60. Leisurely walks PASEOS
62. Parsons’ places MANSES
64. Sadie Hawkins Day suitors GALS
66. Supermodel Cheryl TIEGS
67. Testing stage BETA
69. Meditation sounds OMS
70. Reims rejection NON
71. Suffolk slammers GAOLS
72. Matches AGREES
73. Something to jump for JOY
74. John in Dublin SEAN
75. Protective sports equipment PADS
76. Birth-related NATAL
77. Wallops SLUGS
80. Start to date? PRE-
81. Hospital fluids SERA
83. Some NFL ball carriers FBS
84. Towel specification HERS
87. Spa supplies OILS
89. Fabric often decorated with pastoral scenes TOILE
91. Arenas STADIA
92. “What __!”: “I’ve been had!” A RIP
93. Steering apparatus part TIE ROD
95. Pal PAISAN
96. Potter’s made him invisible CLOAK
98. __ once ALL AT
99. En __: on a streak, in sports slang FUEGO
100. One with a part ACTOR
101. Balkan capital SOFIA
102. They’re loaded HAVES
104. “Voice of Israel” author EBAN
105. Sly tactic RUSE
107. Olympian’s prize GOLD
108. Italian hot spot ETNA
109. Miss, overseas: Abbr. SRTA
112. Fleur-de-__ LIS
113. Ending with pay -OLA
114. Yang counterpart YIN

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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Nov 15, Sunday”

  1. Toughest puzzle of the past week for me. Were there any English words in this puzzle?? Seemed like I was running into a foreign word (including British) every other clue/answer. Setter should go to GAOL for all those words…

    Coincidentally, I just heard this story last night regarding the origin of the word honeymoon. There are many theories on its origin, but I'll choose to believe this one because it's more fun than the others. Apparently the "honey" is a reference to the gift of mead, which of course is made from honey, that was given to the couple that supposedly gave the woman fertility. The couple was given a month's supply (or one moon's worth) of mead as a wedding gift – hence "honeymoon".

    Along those lines, who goes on a SAFARI for a honeymoon???

    Short week this week!

    Best –

  2. @Jeff

    It makes sense to me that couples go on safari for a honeymoon since there will be a whole lot of lion going on…(rim shot!)

    I really thought I was going to DNF this puzzle because of the middle eastern border, but eventually it came together after I figured out that 55 Down's answer was not "for" and finally got "ace" in there. Whew!

    I just did the Sunday puzzle this morning so probably no one other than Bill will see these comments, but hey – that never stopped me before so this time is no exception.

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