LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Apr 17, Sunday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Action Figures

Today’s themed answers are all common phrases that take the form “X-ing Y”. However, the phrases have been reinterpreted so that Y is the family name of a famous showbiz personality whose given name is referenced in the clue. Very punny!

  • 23A. Doris during a workout? : TRAINING DAY (from “Doris Day”)
  • 29A. Director Oliver working on pizza dough? : ROLLING STONE (from “Oliver Stone”)
  • 59A. Comical Samantha busy stitching? : QUILTING BEE (from “Samantha Bee”)
  • 78A. Nicolas taking a swing? : BATTING CAGE (from “Nicolas Cage”)
  • 106A. Singer Al making a strike? : BOWLING GREEN (from “Al Green”)
  • 115A. Nathan at quarterback? : PASSING LANE (from “Nathan Lane”)
  • 3D. Sally having fun? : PLAYING FIELD (from “Sally Field”)
  • 65D. Lucille on a trampoline? : BOUNCING BALL (from “Lucille Ball”)

Bill’s time: 16m 31s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Quaker in the wind : ASPEN

The “quaking” aspen tree is so called because the structure of the leaves causes them to move easily in the wind, to “tremble, quake”.

11. “House” actor Omar : EPPS

Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Forman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Forman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on “ER”. And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

15. Full house, e.g. : HAND

That would be in the card game poker.

19. Pond flower : CALLA

“Calla lily” is a common name for a lily of the genus Zantedeschia. There is a lily genus called calla, but the calla lily isn’t in it. Now that, that is confusing …

23. Doris during a workout? : TRAINING DAY (from “Doris Day”)

The actress and singer Doris Day was born Doris Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio. Day made more than 650 recordings as a singer with Columbia Records, and also appeared in 39 movies. Outside the world of entertainment, she has been an ardent supporter of animal rights. She now lives in Carmel-by-the-Sea in California, along with her many pets and stray animals that she has adopted over the years.

25. Maker of Regenerist skin care products : OLAY

Oil of Olay was developed in South Africa in 1949. When Oil of Olay was introduced internationally, it was given slightly different brand names designed to appeal in the different geographies. In Ireland we know it as Oil of Ulay, for example, and in France it is Oil of Olaz.

26. ‘Vette roof option : T-TOP

The Chevrolet Corvette was introduced to the world in 1953, and was named after the small maneuverable warship called a corvette. The Corvette has legs. It is the only American sports car that has been around for over 50 years.

28. Greenwich Village sch. : NYU

The main campus of the private New York University (NYU) is located right in Manhattan, in Washington Square in the heart of Greenwich Village. NYU has over 12,000 resident students, the largest number of residents in a private school in the whole country. NYU’s sports teams are known as the Violets, a reference to the violet and white colors that are worn in competition. Since the 1980s, the school’s mascot has been a bobcat. “Bobcat” had been the familiar name given to NYU’s Bobst Library computerized catalog.

29. Director Oliver working on pizza dough? : ROLLING STONE (from “Oliver Stone”)

Oliver Stone came to prominence as a film director in the 1980s when he came out with a string of war films such as “Salvador”, “Platoon” and “Born on the Fourth of July”. Stone dropped out of Yale University in the sixties and spent six months in South Vietnam teaching English. A few years later he signed up with the US Army and requested combat duty in South Vietnam and completed a 15-month tour. His movie “Platoon” is a semi-autobiographical account of his experiences during the Vietnam War.

32. Cymbals with a pedal : HI-HAT

In a drum kit, a hi-hat is a pairing of cymbals that sits on a stand and is played by using a foot pedal. The top cymbal is raised and lowered by the foot, hence creating a crashing sound.

36. Perfect Sleepers, e.g. : SERTAS

Serta was founded in 1931 when a group of 13 mattress manufacturers came together, essentially forming a cooperative. Today, the Serta company is owned by eight independent licensees in a similar arrangement. Serta advertisements feature the Serta Counting Sheep. Each numbered sheep has a different personality, such as:

  • #1 The Leader of the Flock
  • #½ The Tweener
  • #13 Mr. Bad Luck
  • #53 The Pessimist
  • #86 Benedict Arnold

37. Yoga class greeting : NAMASTE

In the Hindu tradition, “namaste” is a respectful greeting meaning “I bow to the divine in you”. The greeting usually includes a slight bow made with the palms of the hand pressed together, pointing upwards in front of the body.

48. Subj. for Janet Yellen : ECON

The economist Janet Yellen was appointed Chair of the Federal Reserve in 2014 by President Obama. When her appointment was confirmed by the US Senate, Yellen became the first woman to hold the position.

51. Diaper cream additive : ALOE

“Diaper” is another word that I had to learn when I moved to America. What are called “diapers” over here, we call “nappies” back in Ireland. The term “diaper” is actually the original term that was used in England for the garment, where “diaper” referred to the cloth that was used. The term diaper was brought to the New World where it stuck. Back in Britain, diaper was displaced by the word “nappy”, a diminutive of “napkin”.

54. Quisling’s crime : TREASON

Treason is a serious crime committed against the nation (or the sovereign). One who commits “treason” is called a “traitor”. In the past, the term treason also applied to lesser crimes (like a woman killing her husband) so there was a differentiation between high treason against the king, and “petit treason”, against a more common citizen.

We use the word “quisling” for a person who is a collaborator with enemy forces during wartime. The term comes from Norwegian Vidkun Quisling, who led a regime during WWII that collaborated with the occupying Nazi forces.

57. 1688 coffeehouse founder Edward better known in the insurance world : LLOYD

Back in the 17th and 18th centuries, members of the shipping industry community were in the habit of meeting regularly in Lloyd’s Coffee House in London, an establishment owned by one Edward Lloyd. The coffee house’s owner catered to his clientele by providing regular news about the shipping industry. The shipping merchants discussed deals among themselves, forming syndicates that insured vessels and cargo, for each other and for others in the business. The members of the group eventually relocated to a permanent headquarters, but maintained the name “Society of Lloyd’s”, which exists to this day.

59. Comical Samantha busy stitching? : QUILTING BEE (from “Samantha Bee”)

Samantha Bee is a comedian from Toronto who is best known as a correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” starting way back in 2003. Bee left “The Daily Show” in 2015 to host her own late-night talk show “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” on TBS.

62. Masterful move : COUP

A coup d’état (often just “coup”) is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for “stroke of state”. The Swiss-German word “putsch” is sometimes used instead of “coup”, with “Putsch” translating literally as “sudden blow”.

64. Ski resort sight : GONDOLA

The word “gondola” was originally limited to the famous boats that travel along the canals of Venice. When man started to fly through the air in hot air balloons, “gondola” was used for the basket in which the passenger(s) traveled. By extension, the structure carrying passengers and crew under an airship is also called a gondola, as are the cars suspended from a cable at a ski resort.

68. Some battered rings : CALAMARI

“Calamaro” is the Italian word for “squid” (plural “calamari”).

70. Mumbai mister : SRI

Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

71. Baker’s gluten-free choice : OAT FLOUR

Gluten is a protein mixture found in foods processed mainly from wheat. The sticky properties of gluten are used in making bread, giving dough its elasticity and making the final product chewy. “Gluten” is the Latin word for “glue”.

73. JFK : New York :: __ : Chicago : ORD

O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII.

74. Singer Laine : FRANKIE

The singer Frankie Laine was known for singing the theme songs from Western movies and shows, although he wasn’t a country & western singer. Laine released a version of the theme for “High Noon” for example, and “Champion the Wonder Horse”, and they became bigger hits than the originals.

77. Lara’s love : YURI

“Doctor Zhivago” is an epic novel by Boris Pasternak, first published in 1957. I haven’t tried to read it the book, but the 1965 film version is a must-see, directed by David Lean and starring Omar Sharif in the title role. The story centers on Yuri Zhivago, a doctor and poet, and how he is affected by the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War.

The heroine of Boris Pasternak’s epic novel “Doctor Zhivago” is Lara. The Lara character was inspired by Pasternak’s mistress Olga Ivinskaya.

78. Nicolas taking a swing? : BATTING CAGE (from “Nicolas Cage”)

The actor Nicolas “Nic” Cage was born Nicolas Coppola. Cage is the nephew of director Francis Ford Coppola and actress Talia Shire, both of whom are his father’s siblings.

81. Painter of dancers : DEGAS

Edgar Degas was a French artist, famous for his paintings and sculptures. Some of Degas’ most beautiful works feature female ballet dancers, and others depict women bathing.

88. Disc golf obstacle : TREE

Disc golf is also known as Frisbee golf.

The Frisbee concept started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

89. Dürer, e.g. : ETCHER

Albrecht Dürer was a German artist who was noted for his etchings and engravings as well as for his paintings.

91. They, in Cognac : ILS

Cognac is a famous variety of brandy named after the town of Cognac in the very west of France. To be called cognac, the brandy must be distilled twice in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in very specific French oak barrels.

92. One typing a’s and z’s : PINKIE

The use of “pinkie” or “pinky” for the little finger or toe comes into English from “pinkje”, the Dutch word for the same digit. Who knew …?

97. Certain triathlete : IRONMAN

An Ironman Triathlon is a race involving a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride, and a marathon run of just over 26 miles. The idea for the race came out of a debate between some runners in the 1977 Oahu Perimeter Relay. They were questioning whether runners, swimmers or bikers were the most fit athletes. The debaters decided to combine three local events to determine the answer, inviting athletes from all three disciplines. The events that were mimicked to come up with the first triathlon were the Waikiki Roughwater swim (2.4 miles), the Around-Oahu Bike Race (115 miles) and the Honolulu Marathon (26.2 miles). The idea was that whoever finished first would be called “the Iron Man”. The first triathlon was run in 1978, with fifteen starters and only twelve finishers. The race format is used all over the world now, but the Hawaiian Ironman is the event that everyone wants to win.

102. Linguine sauce : PESTO

The term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as “pesto” sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, pesto from Genoa in northern Italy. I love, love pesto sauce …

106. Singer Al making a strike? : BOWLING GREEN (from “Al Green”)

Al Green is a gospel and soul music singer. Green was born in Arkansas, where he started out as a gospel singer and moved into R&B. In 1974, he was assaulted by a girlfriend who burned him badly on much of his body by pouring boiling grits over him (and then she committed suicide). The incident changed Green’s life and he turned to the church, becoming a pastor in Memphis in 1976. He continued to record music, but never really enjoyed the same success that he had in the early seventies with hits like “Let’s Stay Together” and “I’m Still In Love With You”.

113. Eurasian border river : URAL

The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

115. Nathan at quarterback? : PASSING LANE (from “Nathan Lane”)

Nathan Lane is a wonderful actor, one perhaps most associated with musical theater. Famous roles include Albert in “The Birdcage” and Max in “The Producers”. Best of all though to me, is Lane’s performance in the 1996 film “The Birdcage”.

119. Exiled Roman poet : OVID

The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil. Although he was immensely popular during his own lifetime, he spent the last ten years of his life in exile. He fell foul of Emperor Augustus, although what led to this disfavor isn’t truly understood.

122. Florist’s creation : POSY

A “poesy” was the name given to a line of verse engraved on the inner surface of a ring. The related word “posy”, meaning a bouquet of flowers, arose with the notion that giving a posy might be a message of love, just as a poesy inside a ring could have the same meaning.

124. “Spider-Man” actress : DUNST

Kirsten Dunst is a Hollywood actress from Point Pleasant, New Jersey. Dunst is perhaps best known for playing the love interest and female lead in the “Spider-Man” series of movies opposite Tobey Maguire. Personally, my favorite Dunst films are “Wimbledon” and “Marie Antoinette”. Dunst is a dual citizen of the US and Germany, as her father is from Hamburg.

125. Shoelace protector : AGLET

An aglet is a plastic or metal sheath that is found on the end of a shoelace or perhaps a drawstring. The name “aglet” comes from the Old French word “aguillette” meaning “needle”.

Down

2. 2002 skating gold medalist Hughes : SARAH

American figure skater Sarah Hughes won the Ladies Singles’ gold medal at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games.

3. Sally having fun? : PLAYING FIELD (from “Sally Field”)

Actress Sally Field first came to the public’s attention in the sixties with title roles in the TV shows “Gidget” and “The Flying Nun”. She has two Best Actress Oscars: one for “Norma Rae” (1979) and one for “Places in the Heart” (1984).

4. Cuthbert of “24” : ELISHA

Elisha Cuthbert is a Canadian actress who came to world attention playing Kim Bauer, Jack Bauer’s daughter on TV’s “24”. After “24”, Cuthbert played one of the lead characters on the sitcom “Happy Endings” that ran from 2011 to 2013.

5. Editor Talese with her own Doubleday imprint : NAN

Nan Talese is an editor working at Doubleday. She is married to author Gay Talese, who is apparently in the process of writing a non-fiction book documenting their life together.

6. Stylish : TONY

Something described as “tony” is elegant or exclusive. “Tony” is derived from the word “tone”.

7. Amen Corner golf course, familiarly : AUGUSTA

The Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia was founded in 1933 by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Famously, Augusta hosts the Masters Tournament each year. Augusta is very much a private club, and some of its policies have drawn criticism over the years. Prior to 1959, the club had a bylaw requiring that all caddies be African American. There were no African-American club members admitted until 1990, and no women until 2012.

One section of the course at Augusta National has been nicknamed as Amen Corner since 1958. It comprises the second shot at the 11th hole, all of the 12th hole, and the first couple of shots at the 13th.

10. Pooh’s mopey pal : EEYORE

Eeyore is the donkey character in A. A. Milne’s “Winnie-the-Pooh”. Eeyore is very lovable, but has a gloomy and pessimistic outlook on life.

11. “Silent Spring” subj. : ECOL

DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don’t forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book “Silent Spring”, suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

12. Canines with corded coats : PULIS

The puli is a small herding dog that is noted for its coat with tight curls that resemble dreadlocks. Pulik (the plural) originated in Hungary.

15. Spicy steamed Mexican food : HOT TAMALE

A tamale is a traditional dish from Central America composed of a starchy dough that is steamed or boiled in a wrapper made from a corn husk or banana leaf. The dough is called masa, and can include many different ingredients including meat, cheese fruit and vegetables.

16. “He Was Despised,” in Handel’s “Messiah” : ALTO SOLO

George Frideric Handel was the King of the Oratorio. Handel’s most famous oratorio is “Messiah”, which had its debut performance in Dublin, Ireland back in 1742.

17. Strip gas : NEON

The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

31. Amtrak stop: Abbr. : STN

Amtrak is the name used commercially by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation. “Amtrak” comes from a melding of the words “America” and “track”.

33. “__ Schoolchildren”: Tracy Kidder book : AMONG

Tracy Kidder is a writer from New York City. Kidder was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1981 for his book called “The Soul of a New Machine”, which is a non-fiction work about the creation of a new design of computer.

38. Google Maps lines: Abbr. : STS

Google Maps was developed as a web mapping service for desktops. The (wonderful!) Google Maps mobile app was released in 2008, and is now the most popular smartphone app in the world.

42. Tofurky protein source : SOY

Tofurky is the brand name of a turkey “replacement” made from wheat protein and tofu. I am a vegan and have tried Tofurky, and it is disgusting …

43. Newsman Koppel : TED

The broadcast journalist Ted Koppel is most associated with his long run as anchor for the “Nightline” program on ABC. Koppel was actually born in England, to a Jewish family that had fled from Germany. He emigrated with his family to the US when he was 13 years old. Koppel is great friends with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger who was a frequent guest on his television show.

44. Debacle : FIASCO

Back in the mid-1800s, “fiasco” was theater slang meaning “failure in performance”. The meaning morphed soon after into any kind of failure or flop. The term evolved from the Italian “far fiasco”, a phrase that the same meaning in Italian theater, but translated literally as “make a bottle”. It turns out that “fiasco” and “flask” both derive from the Latin “flasco” meaning “bottle”.

A “debacle” is a disaster, and is a French word with the same meaning. In French, the term originally was used for the breaking up of ice on a river.

53. Ottawa-born songwriter Paul : ANKA

Canadian-born Paul Anka’s big hit was in 1957, the song entitled “Diana”. Anka was the subject of a much-lauded documentary film in 1962 called “Lonely Boy”.

55. “View of Toledo” painter : EL GRECO

“El Greco” (“the Greek”, in Spanish) was the nickname of the artist whose real name was Domenikos Theotokopoulos. El Greco was born in Crete in 1541, and moved to Venice to study art when he was in his early twenties. A few years later he moved to the city of Toledo in central Spain, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life.

56. Yours, in Cognac : A TOI

“À toi” is the French term for “yours”, when talking to someone with whom one is familiar. “À toi” literally means “to you”.

57. Romaine bit : LEAF

Romaine is also known as cos lettuce, with the “romaine” name being most common here in North America.

59. Tonic ingredient : QUININE

The original tonic water was a fairly strong solution of the drug quinine dissolved in carbonated water. It was used in tropical areas in South Asia and Africa where malaria is rampant. The quinine has a prophylactic effect against the disease, and was formulated as “tonic water” so that it could be easily distributed. In British colonial India, the colonial types got into the habit of mixing in gin with the tonic water to make it more palatable by hiding the bitter taste of the quinine. Nowadays, the level of quinine in tonic water has been dropped, and sugar has been added.

65. Lucille on a trampoline? : BOUNCING BALL (from “Lucille Ball”)

Lucille Ball was at the height of her success while she was married to Desi Arnaz. The couple met in 1940 and not long afterwards eloped. Lucy had several miscarriages before she gave birth to her first child in 1951, just one month before her fortieth birthday. A year and a half later, while “I Love Lucy” was garnering large audiences, she became pregnant with her second child, a pregnancy that was written into the television show’s script. In fact, the day that Lucy gave birth on the show, was the same day that she gave birth in real life.

66. Pass good in 28 countries : EURAIL

In my days as a student, the way to backpack around Europe was using a Europass. Nowadays that is known as a Eurail pass. The Eurail pass gives you access to most trains (and some shipping lines) right across the continent.

69. Degs. for writers : MFAS

Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

70. Something flashed by a catcher : SIGN

That would be baseball.

72. The Eagles’ “__ Eyes” : LYIN’

The Eagles song “Lyin’ Eyes” was recorded in 1975. Written by band members Don Henley and Glenn Frey, the lyrics were inspired by a meeting between a man and a woman the composers witnessed in Dan Tana’s Bar & Restaurant in Los Angeles. Henley and Frey imagined a scenario of secret love, and “Lyin’ Eyes” was born.

79. Had Subway fare : ATE

The SUBWAY chain of fast food restaurants is the largest single-brand restaurant in the world. I’m a big fan of SUBWAY sandwiches, especially the toasted ones …

80. Physics Nobelist of 1938 : FERMI

Enrico Fermi was born in Rome, Italy. Fermi moved to the US just before WWII, largely to escape the anti-Semitic feelings that were developing in Italy under Mussolini. It was Fermi’s work at the University of Chicago that led to the construction of the world’s first nuclear reactor. Fermi died at 53 years of age from stomach cancer . Cancer was a prevalent cause of death among the team working on that first nuclear pile.

81. Tango move : DIP

The dramatic dance called the tango originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay. Dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires in particular traveled to Europe and beyond in the early twentieth century and brought the tango with them. The tango craze first struck Europe in Paris in the 1910s, and from there spread to London and Berlin, crossing the Atlantic to New York in 1913.

82. London’s Virgin __ Records : EMI

Virgin EMI Records is a label that formed in 2013 with the merger of Mercury Records UK and Virgin Records. The list of artists recording with Virgin EMI includes Justin Bieber, Elton John, Rihanna, Katy Perry, Taylor Swift, Paul McCartney, U2, Willie Nelson and Red Hot Chili Peppers.

85. “Billions” network, briefly : SHO

“Billions” is a Showtime drama series starring Paul Giamatti and Damian Lewis. It’s about a federal prosecutor going after a hedge fund manager in New York. I haven’t seen this one, but hear good things. Must be good with Giamatti and Lewis starring …

86. Muscle-bone connector : TENDON

Tendons are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle.

88. “16 and Pregnant” spin-off : TEEN MOM

“Teen Mom” is an MTV reality TV show. Not for me …

90. King known for his wealth : CROESUS

Croesus was the king of Lydia from 560 to 547 BC. He was noted for his fabulous wealth. As a result, the name “Croesus” entered the English language as a synonym for a wealthy man in expressions such as “rich as Croesus” and “richer than Croesus”.

93. “Lord, is __?”: Matthew : IT I

At the Last Supper, Jesus told his apostles that one of them would betray him that day. According to the Gospel of Matthew:

And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

95. Big primate : APE

Apes and monkeys both belong to the order of primates. The most obvious way to distinguish apes from monkeys is by the presence or lack of a tail. Almost all apes have no tail, and almost all monkeys have tails.

100. __ nectar: sugar substitute : AGAVE

Agave nectar (also “agave syrup”) is sweeter than honey, but is much more fluid. The nectar’s sweetness comes from its high fructose content. A lot of agave nectar comes from the blue agave, the same species that is used to make tequila.

101. Wrinkly fruits : UGLIS

The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

103. Major snag : SNAFU

SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that’s the “polite” version!). As one might perhaps imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

105. Broadway matchmaker : YENTE

Yenta (also “Yente”) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater “yenta” came to mean a busybody, gossip.

107. Sister brand of Nilla : OREO

The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

As one might expect, “Nilla” is a shortened form of “vanilla”. However, you won’t find any vanilla in Nilla brand cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred …?

116. Scott Eastwood, to Clint : SON

Actor Scott Eastwood is the youngest son of Clint Eastwood. Scott has appeared in quite a few movies that his father directed, including “Gran Torino”, “Invictus” and “Flags of Our Fathers”.

117. “Today” alternative, for short : GMA

“Good Morning America” (GMA) is ABC’s morning show, and has been since 1975. There was even a spinoff show called “Good Afternoon America”, although that only lasted for a few months in 2012.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Quaker in the wind : ASPEN

6. Little bite : TASTE

11. “House” actor Omar : EPPS

15. Full house, e.g. : HAND

19. Pond flower : CALLA

20. Navel type : OUTIE

21. Selectively remove : CULL

22. Butterlike topping : OLEO

23. Doris during a workout? : TRAINING DAY (from “Doris Day”)

25. Maker of Regenerist skin care products : OLAY

26. ‘Vette roof option : T-TOP

27. Claims : SAYS

28. Greenwich Village sch. : NYU

29. Director Oliver working on pizza dough? : ROLLING STONE (from “Oliver Stone”)

32. Cymbals with a pedal : HI-HAT

34. Tire for emergencies : SPARE

36. Perfect Sleepers, e.g. : SERTAS

37. Yoga class greeting : NAMASTE

39. Place for a bud? : EAR

41. Deepest, as feelings : INMOST

44. Tiny bit : FIG

46. Many a pizza slice : OCTANT

48. Subj. for Janet Yellen : ECON

51. Diaper cream additive : ALOE

52. Labor day deliveries : INFANTS

54. Quisling’s crime : TREASON

57. 1688 coffeehouse founder Edward better known in the insurance world : LLOYD

58. Cause of some lines : AGING

59. Comical Samantha busy stitching? : QUILTING BEE (from “Samantha Bee”)

61. Look for : SEEK

62. Masterful move : COUP

64. Ski resort sight : GONDOLA

65. Avoid, as an issue : BEG

68. Some battered rings : CALAMARI

70. Mumbai mister : SRI

71. Baker’s gluten-free choice : OAT FLOUR

73. JFK : New York :: __ : Chicago : ORD

74. Singer Laine : FRANKIE

76. Troubles : ILLS

77. Lara’s love : YURI

78. Nicolas taking a swing? : BATTING CAGE (from “Nicolas Cage”)

80. Big 112-Down : FINAL

81. Painter of dancers : DEGAS

84. Lacking variety : ONE-NOTE

85. Silkscreen aid : STENCIL

87. Computer with a Magic Keyboard : IMAC

88. Disc golf obstacle : TREE

89. Dürer, e.g. : ETCHER

91. They, in Cognac : ILS

92. One typing a’s and z’s : PINKIE

94. Used a bench, say : SAT

97. Certain triathlete : IRONMAN

99. French sponge cake : GATEAU

102. Linguine sauce : PESTO

104. Squalid : DINGY

106. Singer Al making a strike? : BOWLING GREEN (from “Al Green”)

109. Spanish pronoun : ESO

111. Provide a bank floor plan for, say : ABET

113. Eurasian border river : URAL

114. Alpha __ : MALE

115. Nathan at quarterback? : PASSING LANE (from “Nathan Lane”)

118. Inconsequential : MERE

119. Exiled Roman poet : OVID

120. Clashing with, with “of” : AFOUL

121. Sheds : MOLTS

122. Florist’s creation : POSY

123. State of disarray : MESS

124. “Spider-Man” actress : DUNST

125. Shoelace protector : AGLET

Down

1. Accomplishments : ACTS

2. 2002 skating gold medalist Hughes : SARAH

3. Sally having fun? : PLAYING FIELD (from “Sally Field”)

4. Cuthbert of “24” : ELISHA

5. Editor Talese with her own Doubleday imprint : NAN

6. Stylish : TONY

7. Amen Corner golf course, familiarly : AUGUSTA

8. Benchmark: Abbr. : STD

9. Pageant sparkler : TIARA

10. Pooh’s mopey pal : EEYORE

11. “Silent Spring” subj. : ECOL

12. Canines with corded coats : PULIS

13. Flier : PLANE

14. Con man’s expression : SLY GRIN

15. Spicy steamed Mexican food : HOT TAMALE

16. “He Was Despised,” in Handel’s “Messiah” : ALTO SOLO

17. Strip gas : NEON

18. Suss (out) : DOPE

24. In one piece : INTACT

30. Grassy expanse : LEA

31. Amtrak stop: Abbr. : STN

33. “__ Schoolchildren”: Tracy Kidder book : AMONG

35. Unreleased : PENT-UP

38. Google Maps lines: Abbr. : STS

40. Varnish component : RESIN

42. Tofurky protein source : SOY

43. Newsman Koppel : TED

44. Debacle : FIASCO

45. Engaged : IN GEAR

47. Hexa- halved : TRI-

49. Express sympathy (with) : CONDOLE

50. Needing to be saved? : ON GOAL

53. Ottawa-born songwriter Paul : ANKA

55. “View of Toledo” painter : EL GRECO

56. Yours, in Cognac : A TOI

57. Romaine bit : LEAF

59. Tonic ingredient : QUININE

60. Layered lunches : BLTS

62. Golf course rental : CART

63. Soapbox user : ORATOR

65. Lucille on a trampoline? : BOUNCING BALL (from “Lucille Ball”)

66. Pass good in 28 countries : EURAIL

67. Tailgating fixtures : GRILLS

69. Degs. for writers : MFAS

70. Something flashed by a catcher : SIGN

72. The Eagles’ “__ Eyes” : LYIN’

75. Prayer supports : KNEES

76. Following remark? : I GET IT

78. Place for shady transactions : BACK ALLEY

79. Had Subway fare : ATE

80. Physics Nobelist of 1938 : FERMI

81. Tango move : DIP

82. London’s Virgin __ Records : EMI

83. Turf disputes : GANG WARS

85. “Billions” network, briefly : SHO

86. Muscle-bone connector : TENDON

88. “16 and Pregnant” spin-off : TEEN MOM

90. King known for his wealth : CROESUS

93. “Lord, is __?”: Matthew : IT I

95. Big primate : APE

96. One of 18 on a disc golf course : TEE PAD

98. Like sundials : ANALOG

100. __ nectar: sugar substitute : AGAVE

101. Wrinkly fruits : UGLIS

103. Major snag : SNAFU

105. Broadway matchmaker : YENTE

106. Speed deterrent : BUMP

107. Sister brand of Nilla : OREO

108. Wine list heading : REDS

110. Bank deposit : SILT

112. See 80-Across : TEST

116. Scott Eastwood, to Clint : SON

117. “Today” alternative, for short : GMA

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7 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Apr 17, Sunday”

  1. 24:36, no errors. Led off on the wrong foot in the upper left, so had to erase it and backfill from the bottom up. Otherwise, a pleasant solve, with a helpful theme.

  2. Nice Goldilocks puzzle for Easter Sunday – not too easy, not too difficult. 43 minutes with one error. I had NAMArTE/rTS (as in routes) instead of NAMASTE/STS. I’m really taking to Pookie’s Mensa site for these.

    Who would have thought that something called Tofurky would be disgusting? New piece of info on Bill being a vegan. I too am a vegan except for all the meat, cheese and eggs I eat with them… 🙂

    Most people remember that EEYORE doesn’t have a birthday. In honor of this fact Austin, TX celebrates EEYORE’s birthday the last Saturday of April. It’s become a huge party and supposedly raises money for charities as well. It’s mostly an excuse for live music, food and drink. I’m going to it in 2 weeks. Should be fun, but hotel rates in Austin whenever an event is going on are outrageous enough to make even San Francisco blush.

    Sadly, I watched the series finale of The Wire last night. It’s an amazing series. You really need to look at all 60 episodes as a whole to truly appreciate it. It took me about halfway through the first season to get a handle on it, but I’m glad I stuck with it. Maybe I’ll start on Billions.

    Best –

  3. 1 error (bad guess on 125A-105D), 54 minutes. Didn’t push myself too hard in the course of doing this. Sometimes I wonder how my online time would look for all the writing one has to do for 21x21s, but I still know from my other 21×21 times (33 minutes on last Sunday’s Newsday) that I have a lot of work to do in order to do these well.

    For the “catching up” I’m doing with the WSJ, if anyone hasn’t tried it yet, the 01/12/2017 puzzle is a definite shouldn’t miss.

    Anyhow, on to see how my trip through NYT land will go.

  4. 26:14, 1 (or 2, I suppose) error(s). Had “yenta” instead of “yente” for 105D, which I thought was right, but that gave “aglat ” for 125A, which I should’ve known was wrong. So close! Ah well, happy Easter!

  5. I didn’t ‘do’ the puzzle. busy as a bee – or busy as a sloth …. take your choice.

    But reading your blog letters is certainly very informative. I, too, did not know that Bill is a vegan. Very commendable. ( …. I am not).

    I have been reading a book, off and on, ( it is a lo-ong book – ) by an israeli author, Yuval Noah Harari, titled, Sapiens – a brief history of mankind. Please read JUST this wiki article on this book, it is very short and to the point.
    Aside from his conclusions, that man routinely committed genocide over the centuries, and that religion, money, traditions and legal institutions are total fiction …. read what he has to say about our treatment of animals and how we treat them. Sobering.

    He is himself, a vegan.

    Shamelessly, I still eat meat. Nightmares and all.
    The book itself, is like Guns Germs and Steel – too profound to be read in less than one calender year.
    I am truly amazed and confounded that there are people like this, alive, at this very moment, on the surface of this earth.
    Over and out.
    Happy Easter, all. Don’t all eat the chocolate Easter bunny, all in one sitting.

  6. Finished everything but the darned NW corner! I had GAY Talese.
    So I couldn’t figure out ASPEN, although we’ve seen that several times before. 🙁
    Didn’t know ELISHA or SARAH, so I was doomed.
    Happy Easter. We had a really good service this morning and the choir didn’t mess up!!! (They sound good in rehearsal, but get nervous in performance).

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