LA Times Crossword 11 Jul 19, Thursday

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Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): This Puzzle’s a Hoot!

Themed answers each sound like a common phrase, but one word has been replaced with a sound made by a bird:

  • 17A Devious nestling’s cry? : CHEEP TRICK (sounds like “cheap trick”)
  • 27A Early-rising duck’s call? : QUACK OF DAWN (sounds like “crack of dawn”)
  • 46A Prizeworthy cornfield sounds? : CAWS CELEBRE (sounds like “cause célèbre”)
  • 62A Elegant dove’s murmur? : COO DE GRACE (sounds like “coup de grâce”)

Bill’s time: 7m 03s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Red ink list : DEBTS

To be in the red is to be in debt, to owe money. The expression “in the red” is a reference to the accounting practice of recording debts and losses in red ink in ledgers. The related phrase “in the black” means “solvent, making a profit”.

6 Editor’s “never mind” : STET

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

14 Naturally lit courtyards : ATRIA

In modern architecture, an atrium (plural “atria” or “atriums”) is a large open space usually in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

15 Mex. title : SRTA

“Señorita” (Srta.) is Spanish, and “Mademoiselle” (Mlle.) is French, for “Miss”.

21 Marriott-owned hotel chain : SHERATON

The Sheraton Hotel chain was started by Ernest Henderson and Robert Moore in 1937. The pair bought a hotel that already had a lighted sign on its roof saying “Sheraton Hotel”, and as it was too big and expensive to change, they decided to adopt the name for the whole chain.

24 Div. won by the Braves 13 times : NLE

National League East (NLE)

26 Besmirch : TAR

“Besmirch” is a derivative of “smirch”, with both words meaning to “make dirty”. In particular, to besmirch is to sully someone’s reputation.

32 __ Maria : TIA

Tia Maria is a coffee liqueur that was invented just after WWII in Jamaica using Jamaican coffee beans, Jamaican rum, vanilla and sugar. The drink’s name translates to “Aunt Maria”.

36 Protected at sea : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

42 Four-time Grammy winners Kings of __ : LEON

Kings of Leon is an American rock band formed in Nashville, Tennessee in 1999. The band members are all related to each other and chose the group’s name in honor of their common grandfather, whose given name is “Leon”.

45 Hosp. areas : ORS

Surgery (surg.) is usually performed in an operating room (OR).

46 Prizeworthy cornfield sounds? : CAWS CELEBRE (sounds like “cause célèbre”)

“Cause célèbre” is a French phrase that we have imported into English to describe an issue that arouses widespread controversy. The expression translates from French as “famous case”. The term originated with a large collection of court decisions published in 1762 called “Nouvelles Causes Célèbres”.

50 Letters from the Civil War : CSA

The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation, and retained the post for the life of the government.

51 Mine bonanza : LODE

A lode is a metal ore deposit that’s found between two layers of rock or in a fissure. The mother lode is the principal deposit in a mine, usually of gold or silver. “Mother lode” is probably a translation of “veta madre”, an expression used in mining in Mexico.

A bonanza is a mine with a rich pocket of ore that can be exploited. “Bonanza” is the Spanish word for a rich lode, and we imported the term into English. “Bonanza” originally meant “fair weather at sea”, and from that came to mean “prosperity, good fortune”. Ultimately, “bonanza” comes from the Latin “bonus” meaning “good”.

62 Elegant dove’s murmur? : COO DE GRACE (sounds like “coup de grâce”)

“Coup de grâce” is a French phrase that we use in English to describe the final blow that puts a person or animal out of their misery. The phrase is used both literally and figuratively, and translates from French as “blow of mercy”.

67 Kit Carson House site : TAOS

Kit Carson was a frontiersman who moved west from Missouri when he was just 16 years old. Kit Carson’s life was immortalized in the novels of John C. Fremont, an explorer who hired Carson as a guide for his travels through California, Oregon and Nevada. Carson later served with the US Army. He is thought to be the only American to have achieved the rank of general without being able to read or write.

Down

1 Russian country house : DACHA

Dachas are usually second homes in Russia and the former Soviet Union that are located outside the city limits in rural areas. Residents/tenants of dachas are often called “dachniks”.

2 Cultural spirit : ETHOS

Rhetoric is the art of speaking or writing effectively, primarily with the intent to persuade. Aristotle defined three persuasive techniques that can be used to persuade an audience:

  • Ethos is an ethical appeal, an attempt to convince the audience of the good moral character and credibility of the speaker.
  • Logos is an appeal to logic, an attempt to convince an audience by using logic and reason.
  • Pathos is an emotional appeal, an attempt to convince an audience by appealing to their emotions.

5 Easy marks : SAPS

“Sap” is slang for “fool, someone easily scammed”. The term arose in the early 1800s in Britain when it was used in “saphead” and “sapskull”. All these words derive from “sapwood”, which is the softwood found in tree trunks between the bark and the heartwood at the center.

6 Kazakhstan, once: Abbr. : SSR

The Republic of Kazakhstan in Central Asia is the world’s largest landlocked country. Kazakhstan was also the last of the former Soviet Republics (SSRs) to declare itself independent from Russia.

10 Astronomical time period : SOLAR DAY

A solar day is the time taken for a planet to rotate completely about its axis so the sun reappears in the same position in the sky. A solar day on Earth is 24 hours. A solar day on Mars is just under 24 hours, and is referred to as a “sol”.

11 Lit __ : CRIT

Literary studies, also called literary criticism (lit crit), is the evaluation and interpretation of literature.

13 Kohler rival : MOEN

The Moen line of faucets was started in 1956 by inventor Alfred M, Moen. It was Moen who invented the first single-handed mixing faucet.

Kohler is a manufacturer of plumbing products based in Kohler, a village in Wisconsin that was renamed in 1912 in honor of the company. The Kohler Company was founded in 1873 by Austrian immigrants John Kohler and Charles Silberzahn.

18 Academic goal : TENURE

A job in a university that is described as “tenure-track” is one that can lead to a tenured position. A tenured position is a “job for life”. A person with tenure can only be dismissed for cause.

22 Churchill’s “so few”: Abbr. : RAF

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the oldest independent air force in the world (i.e. the first air force to become independent of army or navy forces). The RAF was formed during WWI on 1 April 1918, a composite of two earlier forces, the Royal Flying Corps (part of the Army) and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF’s “finest hour” was the Battle of Britain, when the vastly outnumbered British fighters fought off the might of the Luftwaffe causing Hitler to delay his plan to cross the English Channel. This outcome prompted Winston Churchill to utter the memorable words

Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

25 Bay leaf source : LAUREL

The seasoning known as bay leaf is the aromatic leaf of the bay laurel tree or shrub. Fresh bay leaves aren’t very flavorful and need to be dried and aged a few weeks before use in the kitchen.

27 Moon and Starr of the NFL : QBS

Warren Moon is a retired quarterback who played for the Edmonton Eskimos, Houston Oilers, Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks and Kansas City Chiefs.

Bart Starr was a football player and coach who spent his whole career with the Green Bay Packers, playing quarterback for the Packers from 1956 to 1971. Starr was named Most Valuable Player (MVP) in the first two Super Bowls.

28 Skewered fare : KEBABS

The term “kebab” (also “kabob”) covers a wide variety of meat dishes that originated in Persia. In the West, we usually use “kebab” when talking about shish kebab, which is meat (often lamb) served on a skewer. “Shish” comes from the Turkish word for “skewer”.

30 2003 Masters champ Mike : WEIR

Mike Weir is a Canadian, left-handed golfer who plays on the PGA tour. Weir won the 2003 Masters Tournament.

32 Locker room sprinkle : TALC

Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

38 To a great degree : IN SPADES

The phrase “in spades” meaning “in abundance” dates back to the late twenties. The term probably comes from the game of bridge, in which spades are the highest-ranking suit.

41 Contest where participants stand for a spell : BEE

Back in 18th-century America, when neighbors would gather to work for the benefit of one of their group, such a meeting was called a bee. The name “bee” was an allusion to the social nature of the insect. In modern parlance, a further element of entertainment and pleasure has been introduced, for example in a quilting bee, or even a spelling bee.

47 Elevator __ : CAR

Elevators (simple hoists) have been around for a long time. What Elisha Otis did was come up with the “safety elevator”, a design that he showcased at the 1853 World’s Fair in New York. At the Fair, Otis would stand on an elevated platform in front of onlookers and order his assistant to cut the single rope holding up the platform. His safety system kicked in when the platform had only fallen a few inches, amazing the crowd. After this demonstration, the orders came rolling in.

51 He played Ugarte in “Casablanca” : LORRE

The marvelous actor Peter Lorre was born in what is now modern-day Slovakia. Lorre’s real name was Laszlo Lowenstein. He started acting in Vienna when he was quite young, only 17 years old. When Hitler came to power, the Jewish Lowenstein headed to Paris and then London, eventually ending up in Hollywood. Lorre found himself typecast as the wicked foreigner in American movies, but I think he sneered and snarled his way to the bank.

Signor Ugarte is a wonderful character in the classic 1942 film “Casablanca”. Ugarte is played by Peter Lorre, and is the man who has possession of the crucial letters of transit that were obtained by murdering two German couriers.

52 Eyeball benders : OP ART

Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

53 HGTV topic : DECOR

HGTV first went on air in 1994, as the “Home, Lawn and Garden Channel”. The name was shortened soon after (the lawn was “cut”!). Nowadays, it’s referred to as HGTV.

54 Two before marzo : ENERO

In Spanish, the years starts off with “enero, febrero, marzo” (January, February, March).

55 Reddish shade : RUST

Rust is iron oxide. Rust forms when iron oxidizes, reacts with oxygen.

56 Where to find Java : ASIA

Java is a large island in Indonesia that is home to the country’s capital, Jakarta. With a population of over 130 million, Java is the most populous island in the world, with even more people than Honshu, the main island of Japan.

57 Student of Seneca : NERO

Seneca the Younger was a tutor and advisor to Nero, emperor of ancient Rome. Although maybe innocent, Seneca was forced to commit suicide by Nero as it was alleged that Seneca participated in a plot to kill the emperor. To kill himself, Seneca cut into a number of veins in order to bleed to death.

60 Hungarian wine region : EGER

Eger is a city in the northeast of Hungary that is noted for its thermal baths and for its wine production. Back in Ireland, I would quite often drink “Bull’s Blood”, which is Hungary’s most famous red wine, and which comes from the Eger wine region.

63 Rehab symptom, for short : DTS

The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called delirium tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is “trembling madness”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Red ink list : DEBTS
6 Editor’s “never mind” : STET
10 Fast one : SCAM
14 Naturally lit courtyards : ATRIA
15 Mex. title : SRTA
16 Roughly : OR SO
17 Devious nestling’s cry? : CHEEP TRICK (sounds like “cheap trick”)
19 Word on diet food packaging : LITE
20 Like a coach after a rough game, maybe : HOARSE
21 Marriott-owned hotel chain : SHERATON
23 Sets, as a price : ASKS
24 Div. won by the Braves 13 times : NLE
26 Besmirch : TAR
27 Early-rising duck’s call? : QUACK OF DAWN (sounds like “crack of dawn”)
32 __ Maria : TIA
35 Big bully : BRUTE
36 Protected at sea : ALEE
37 Counselor : ADVISER
39 Watch for money, usually : BABYSIT
42 Four-time Grammy winners Kings of __ : LEON
43 Backspace over : ERASE
45 Hosp. areas : ORS
46 Prizeworthy cornfield sounds? : CAWS CELEBRE (sounds like “cause célèbre”)
49 Amigo : PAL
50 Letters from the Civil War : CSA
51 Mine bonanza : LODE
55 Skated on thin ice : RAN A RISK
59 Look into again, as a cold case : REOPEN
61 Brought into play : USED
62 Elegant dove’s murmur? : COO DE GRACE (sounds like “coup de grâce”)
64 Many a retired thoroughbred : SIRE
65 “It __ up to me” : ISN’T
66 Catcher’s interference, in baseball rules : ERROR
67 Kit Carson House site : TAOS
68 Throw away : TOSS
69 Nostalgically fashionable : RETRO

Down

1 Russian country house : DACHA
2 Cultural spirit : ETHOS
3 Work stoppage? : BREAK
4 Elaborate cake layers : TIERS
5 Easy marks : SAPS
6 Kazakhstan, once: Abbr. : SSR
7 Split into thirds : TRISECT
8 Inscribe : ETCH
9 Start liking : TAKE TO
10 Astronomical time period : SOLAR DAY
11 Lit __ : CRIT
12 In the matter of : AS TO
13 Kohler rival : MOEN
18 Academic goal : TENURE
22 Churchill’s “so few”: Abbr. : RAF
25 Bay leaf source : LAUREL
27 Moon and Starr of the NFL : QBS
28 Skewered fare : KEBABS
29 “And another thing … ” : ALSO …
30 2003 Masters champ Mike : WEIR
31 Brings home : NETS
32 Locker room sprinkle : TALC
33 Brain wave : IDEA
34 Admit frankly : AVOW
38 To a great degree : IN SPADES
40 Equally hard to find : AS RARE
41 Contest where participants stand for a spell : BEE
44 Figures : RECKONS
47 Elevator __ : CAR
48 Bring out : ELICIT
51 He played Ugarte in “Casablanca” : LORRE
52 Eyeball benders : OP ART
53 HGTV topic : DECOR
54 Two before marzo : ENERO
55 Reddish shade : RUST
56 Where to find Java : ASIA
57 Student of Seneca : NERO
58 Just all right : SO-SO
60 Hungarian wine region : EGER
63 Rehab symptom, for short : DTS

13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 11 Jul 19, Thursday”

  1. LAT: 8:07, no errors. Newsday: 7:40, no errors. WSJ: 16:14, no errors. Forgot about the BEQ until just now; maybe later … 😜.

    1. BEQ: 21:52, no errors. A clever theme, some very tricky clues, a near-Natick that I guessed correctly, a few off-color entries … and he rates it a “medium” – all in all, a pretty typical offering from Mr. Quigley … 😜.

  2. 25:09 no errors….46 and 62 across were filled via crosses…how many languages does one need to speak to be good at crosswords?
    If LIT CRIT is a word then maybe AMEC could be auto mechanic or BAPL could be baseball player…where does it stop?
    END OF RANT , have a good day all

  3. 13:39. Several unforced errors down in the SW starting with “rose” before RUST, and I only botched it more after that. Eventually, I erased everything in that corner and started over, and then I finally got it.

    Got the theme ok. I knew “cause celebre” until I read what it really means, then I realized I didn’t know it.

    Bit of trivia – DACHA comes from the Russian word that means “to give” or “given”. DACHAS were usually gifts from the Tsars hence the name.

    I’m off to my annual trip to Punta Cana tomorrow morning. I’ll be in and out over the next 10 days or so.

    Best –

  4. 14:43, and a second consecutive DNF!!! 5 unfilled in SW corner and an error on a cross in mid left. I am NOT happy about this!!!!

  5. We did poorly, so no statistics are reported here. About half.

    I knew almost all of the words once I saw the completed puzzle,
    just didn’t apply them at the right time and in the right places. A
    good way to ruin a good weekly average in progress.

    Kudos to all.

  6. LAT: 6:40, no errors. WSJ: 18:18, no errors. Newsday: 8:41, no errors. BEQ: 18:37, 1 error. Fireball: 20:10, no errors I think with a meta I’m not sure about.

  7. Had Rose not RUST, “ave” not TIA.
    Googled for WEIR, QBS, LEON, EGER. Which points out a third subject I’m poor in besides Sports and young Pop – Booze.

  8. It is Thursday – nothing overly difficult, so even I probably finished in under 10 minutes … A few lucky crosses and done.

    So Bill and the other pros finishing in 7-8 minutes makes sense ….

  9. Moderately difficult Thursday for me; took 26 minutes with no errors and about 10 minutes in the SW.

    Had to change ASeAsy to ASRARE. Had USED, ASIA and SIRE in the SW and finally got INSPADES and RUST. Had to run the alphabet to get the O is TAOS and then NERO made sense.

    re Rhetoric – From my watching of the news, it seems like most speakers have given up on Ethos and Logos and switched almost exclusively to Pathos.

  10. Aloha meine Freunden!!! 🦆

    No errors– this was a fun fill, and I thought the theme was cute. It helped, too, until I got to “COO DE GRACE,” which at first didn’t seem right: the other themed clues could be pronounced normally and the pun worked, but coup de grace we pronounce in kind of the French way so the “grace” part didn’t fit, IMO. 🤔

    JEFF– have a good trip and be safe! Don’t forget your crossword peeps!! 😸

    Be well~~🚋⚾️

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