LA Times Crossword 14 Feb 20, Friday

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Constructed by: Garry Morse
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): Peanuts and Chocolate

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! Themed clues gives us a quote from Charles M. Schulz:

  • 17A Start of a Charles M. Schulz quote : ALL YOU NEED …
  • 22A Quote, part 2 : … IS LOVE, BUT A …
  • 38A Quote, part 3 : … LITTLE CHOCOLATE …
  • 50A Quote, part 4 : … NOW AND THEN …
  • 59A End of the quote : … DOESN’T HURT

Bill’s time: 9m 21s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Penthouses, e.g.: Abbr. : APTS

Originally, the term “penthouse” described a modest building attached to a main structure. In fact, in centuries past, the manger in which Jesus was born was often referred to as a penthouse. The modern, more luxurious connotation dates back to the early twenties.

13 Adriatic port : BARI

Bari is a major port city on the Adriatic coast of Italy. Bari has the unfortunate distinction of being the only city in Europe to experience chemical warfare during WWII. Allied stores of mustard gas were released during a German bombing raid on Bari in 1943. Fatalities caused by the chemical agent were reported as 69, although other reports list the number as maybe a thousand military personnel and a thousand civilians.

14 March Madness org. : NCAA

“March Madness” is the name given to the NCAA Men’s Division 1 Basketball Championship (among others), that is held in the spring each year.

15 “Beavis and Butt-head” spin-off : DARIA

“Daria” is an animated television show on MTV. It is a spin-off from the hit series “Beavis and Butthead”.

“Beavis and Butt-Head” is an adult cartoon television show and film. The show ran on MTV. I’ve never seen it …

17 Start of a Charles M. Schulz quote : ALL YOU NEED …

Charles M. Schulz was a cartoonist best known for his comic strip “Peanuts” that featured the much-loved characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy. “Peanuts” was so successful, running daily in over 70 countries and 21 languages, that it earned Schulz an estimated 30-40 million dollars annually.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. As the organization grew, the guiding principles established by the founders were formatted into a 12-step program that was in place by the forties.

21 Twelve-step helper : AA SPONSOR

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. As the organization grew, the guiding principles established by the founders were formatted into a 12-step program that was in place by the forties.

26 Living area in “The Martian,” with “the” : HAB

In the 2015 film “The Martian”, the stranded astronaut survives in the surface habitat (Hab).

28 A Gabor sister : EVA

Eva Gabor was the youngest of the Gabor sisters, all three of whom were celebrated Hollywood actresses and socialites (her siblings were Zsa-Zsa and Magda). One of Eva’s claims to fame is the unwitting promotion of the game called “Twister”, the sales of which were languishing in 1966. In an appearance on “The Tonight Show” she got on all fours and played the game with Johnny Carson. Sales took off immediately, and Twister became a huge hit.

34 Classic sci-fi villain : VADER

The top 5 movie villains in the American Film Institute’s list “100 Years … 100 Heroes & Villains” are:

  1. Dr. Hannibal Lecter in “The Silence of the Lambs”
  2. Norman Bates in “Psycho”
  3. Darth Vader in “The Empire Strikes Back”
  4. The Wicked Witch of the West in “The Wizard of Oz”
  5. Nurse Ratched in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

41 1980s attorney general : MEESE

Ed Meese was born in Oakland, California and spent 24 years in the office of the Treasurer of Alameda County, the county in which I used to live. After military service, Meese earned himself a law degree at UC Berkeley. Later, as chief of staff for President Reagan, he was instrumental in a famous decision to crack down on student protesters at Berkeley which resulted in one protester dying and a two-week occupation of the city by the California National Guard.

58 “__ Mio” : O SOLE

“O sole mio” is a famous Italian song from Naples, written in 1898. The song’s lyrics are usually sung in the original Neapolitan, as opposed to Italian. The title translates from Neapolitan into “My Sun” (and not into “O, My Sun” as one might expect). It’s a love song, sung by a young man declaring that there is a sun brighter than that in the sky, the sun that is his lover’s face. Awww …

61 Avian crop : CRAW

“Craw” is another name for “crop”, a portion of the alimentary tract of some animals, including birds. The crop is used for the storage of food prior to digestion. It allows the animal to eat large amounts and then digest that food with efficiency over an extended period. The expression “to stick in one’s craw” is used when one cannot accept something, cannot “swallow” it.

62 Score symbols : FLATS

That would be a musical score.

64 Whodunit canine : ASTA

Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb “The Thin Man” series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called “Skippy”. Skippy was also the dog in “Bringing Up Baby” with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of “The Thin Man” films.

65 Club with a blue and white diamond logo : SAM’S

Sam’s Club is a warehouse club that is owned and operated by Walmart. It is named after the company’s founder Sam Walton.

66 Phillies slugger Hoskins : RHYS

Rhys Hoskins is a professional baseball player who was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in 2014. Hoskins made his first appearance for the Phillies in 2017.

67 Nair rival, once : NEET

The hair removal product “Neet” was launched in Canada in 1901, and was also sold as “Immac”. Today, it is sold under the name “Veet”.

Down

1 Old counters : ABACI

The abacus (plural “abaci”) was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

5 Prefix with -gram : ANA-

Here are some of my favorite anagrams:

  • “Dormitory” and “dirty room”
  • “Elvis” and “lives”
  • “The eyes” and “they see”
  • “Eleven plus two” and “twelve plus one”

7 Caroline Islands republic : PALAU

Palau is a tiny island nation lying 500 miles east of the Philippines, and 2,000 miles south of Japan. Palau was once a Spanish possession and was sold by Spain to Germany in the late 19th century. During WWI, Japan invaded the islands (Japan had declared war on Germany) and was awarded the islands as a territory by the League of Nations at the end of hostilities. In WWII the US took Palau from the Japanese in a bloody battle in 1944. Palau emerged from American administration in 1994 and is now a sovereign state.

The Caroline Islands are an archipelago of about 500 small islands located in the western Pacific to the north of New Guinea. The island group was named by the Spanish in the 17th century in honor of King Carlos II of Spain.

9 Legendary Carthaginian general : HANNIBAL

Hannibal was a military commander from Ancient Carthage. Hannibal lived during a time of great conflict between Carthage and the Roman Republic, as the Romans worked to extend their influence over the Mediterranean region. Famously, Hannibal took on Rome on their own territory by marching his army, including his war elephants, over the Alps into Italy. His forces occupied much of Italy for 15 years.

The Carthaginian Republic was centered on the city of Carthage, the ruins of which are located on the coast of modern-day Tunisia. The Latin name for the people of Carthage was “Afri”. When the Romans took over Carthage, they created a province they called “Africa”. That name extended over time to include the whole continent.

12 __ City, Iraq : SADR

Sadr City is a suburb of Baghdad that has oft been in the news in recent years. Sadr City is named after the deceased Shia leader Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr.

15 The Carpenters, for one : DUO

The Carpenters were a musical duo comprising brother and sister Richard and Karen Carpenter. Karen had an amazing contralto voice, and played the drums. Richard played the piano, and composed and arranged most of their music. Tragically, Karen Carpenter died in 1983 due to heart failure brought on by an eating disorder. She was only 32 years old.

18 Deep-water fish : OPAH

“Opah” is the more correct name for the fish also known as the sunfish, moonfish or Jerusalem haddock. I’ve seen one in the Monterey Aquarium. It is one huge fish …

20 More wicked, in Worcester : EVILLER

Worcester is a city in the West Midlands of England. The magnificent Worcester Cathedral overlooks the River Severn, on which the city is located. Here in North America, Worcester is perhaps best known as the namesake of Worcester, Massachusetts, and as the home to Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce.

23 Touching competition? : EPEE

The French word for sword is “épée”. In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

27 Guacamole fruit : AVOCADO

Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes. It is prepared by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

28 Disease-stricken tree : ELM

Dutch elm disease is a fungus devastating to all species of elm trees that is transmitted by the elm bark beetle. The disease is thought to have originated in Asia and is now rampant in Europe and North America. Even though there is a hybrid of elm known as the Dutch elm, the disease isn’t named after the tree. Rather, the disease is called “Dutch” as it was identified in 1921 by a phytopathologist (plant pathologist) in the Netherlands.

31 Knee injury initials : ACL

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major ligaments that support the knee.

32 Key letter : PHI

Phi Beta Kappa was the first collegiate Greek fraternity in the US, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. The organization served as a model for future collegiate fraternities and sororities, although in the 19th century Phi Beta Kappa distanced itself from the fraternal focus and transformed into the honor society that it is today, recognizing academic excellence. The initials Phi Beta Kappa stand for “philosophia biou kybernētēs”, which translates into “philosophy is the guide of life”. The symbol of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is a golden key.

33 La preceder : SOL

The sol-fa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

35 Long shot : DARK HORSE

A dark horse is a person or thing that emerges unexpectedly to predominate a situation. As perhaps expected, the term “dark horse” comes from horse racing. The phrase appears to have originated in a novel penned by British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. In “The Young Duke”, published in 1831, Disraeli’s “Duke of St. James” is watching a horse race:

A dark horse which had never been thought of, and which the careless St. James had never even observed in the list, rushed past the grandstand in sweeping triumph.

36 Coming-in hr., roughly : ETA

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

39 Romanov adherents : TSARISTS

The House of Romanov was the second and last imperial dynasty to rule over Russia, after the Rurik dynasty. The reign of the Romanovs ended when Emperor Nicholas II abdicated following the February Revolution of 1917. Famously, Nicholas II and his immediate family were murdered soon after he stepped down, and other members of the Romanov Dynasty were sent into exile by the Bolsheviks.

40 Lyricist Sammy : CAHN

Sammy Cahn wrote for them all, including Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Doris Day. Cahn’s most famous song was probably “Three Coins in the Fountain”. He also wrote “All the Way”, made famous by Frank Sinatra.

45 Tech tutorials site : CNET

c|net is an excellent technology website. c|net started out in 1994 as a television network specializing in technology news. The host of “American Idol”, Ryan Seacrest, started off his career as host of a c|net show.

47 ER diagnostic tool : CT SCAN

A CT (or “CAT”) scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three-dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays. High doses of radiation can be harmful, causing damage that is cumulative over time.

48 Bucks : MOOLA

Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dough, scratch, cheddar, simoleons, clams and moola(h) are all slang terms for money.

“Buck” is a slang term for “dollar”. The term has been around at least since 1856, and is thought to derive from the tradition of using buckskin as a unit of trade with Native Americans during the frontier days.

51 Yellowish brown : OCHER

Ocher is a light, yellowish-brown color, although variations of the pigment are possible such as red ocher and purple ocher. “Ocher” is usually spelled “ochre” on the other side of the pond.

52 “Brideshead Revisited” novelist : WAUGH

Evelyn Waugh was an English author who is most famous for his fabulous 1945 novel “Brideshead Revisited”. Evelyn Waugh met and fell in love with Evelyn Gardner in 1927. Known to friends as “He-Evelyn” and “She-Evelyn”, the couple were married in 1929 (but divorced one year later).

“Brideshead Revisited” is a novel written by Evelyn Waugh that famously was made into a British television series starring Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews. “Brideshead” was the name of the magnificent estate in the storyline. For the television production, Castle Howard in North Yorkshire was used as Brideshead. if you ever get the chance, Castle Howard is for my money, the must-see stately home in England.

56 Sharable PC files : PDFS

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

57 Brain and spinal cord: Abbr. : CNS

Central nervous system (CNS)

60 Saints’ achievements: Abbr. : TDS

Touchdown (TD)

The New Orleans Saints football team takes its name from the jazz song “When the Saints Go Marching In”, a tune that is very much associated with the city. The team was founded in 1967, on November 1st, which is All Saints’ Day in the Roman Catholic tradition.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Penthouses, e.g.: Abbr. : APTS
5 Smartphone downloads : APPS
9 Metaphor for responsibilities : HATS
13 Adriatic port : BARI
14 March Madness org. : NCAA
15 “Beavis and Butt-head” spin-off : DARIA
16 Bickering : AT IT
17 Start of a Charles M. Schulz quote : ALL YOU NEED …
19 Rub the wrong way : CHAFE
21 Twelve-step helper : AA SPONSOR
22 Quote, part 2 : … IS LOVE, BUT A ….
24 Non-neutral atom : ION
25 Light sleeper’s distraction : DRIP
26 Living area in “The Martian,” with “the” : HAB
28 A Gabor sister : EVA
30 Acts of faith? : LEAPS
34 Classic sci-fi villain : VADER
38 Quote, part 3 : … LITTLE CHOCOLATE …
41 1980s attorney general : MEESE
42 Shade related to violet : LILAC
43 Responsibility : RAP
44 Bend : ARC
46 Cope with : HACK
48 Dept. head : MGR
50 Quote, part 4 : … NOW AND THEN …
56 Source of a siren : POLICE CAR
58 “__ Mio” : O SOLE
59 End of the quote : … DOESN’T HURT
61 Avian crop : CRAW
62 Score symbols : FLATS
63 “You’re kidding!” : EGAD!
64 Whodunit canine : ASTA
65 Club with a blue and white diamond logo : SAM’S
66 Phillies slugger Hoskins : RHYS
67 Nair rival, once : NEET

Down

1 Old counters : ABACI
2 Hiking network : PATHS
3 Defense attorney’s concern : TRIAL DATE
4 Be paid to watch, as children : SIT FOR
5 Prefix with -gram : ANA-
6 Techie training site : PC LAB
7 Caroline Islands republic : PALAU
8 Dost speak : SAYST
9 Legendary Carthaginian general : HANNIBAL
10 “You __ busted!” : ARE SO
11 Attach with string : TIE ON
12 __ City, Iraq : SADR
15 The Carpenters, for one : DUO
18 Deep-water fish : OPAH
20 More wicked, in Worcester : EVILLER
23 Touching competition? : EPEE
27 Guacamole fruit : AVOCADO
28 Disease-stricken tree : ELM
29 Face off : VIE
31 Knee injury initials : ACL
32 Key letter : PHI
33 La preceder : SOL
35 Long shot : DARK HORSE
36 Coming-in hr., roughly : ETA
37 Sales staff member : REP
39 Romanov adherents : TSARISTS
40 Lyricist Sammy : CAHN
45 Tech tutorials site : CNET
47 ER diagnostic tool : CT SCAN
48 Bucks : MOOLA
49 Sparkle : GLEAM
51 Yellowish brown : OCHER
52 “Brideshead Revisited” novelist : WAUGH
53 Assortment : ARRAY
54 Thrill : ELATE
55 Unfamiliar with : NEW AT
56 Sharable PC files : PDFS
57 Brain and spinal cord: Abbr. : CNS
60 Saints’ achievements: Abbr. : TDS

20 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 14 Feb 20, Friday”

  1. I started working on the quote first, but alot of the fill in questions weren’t so easy for me. I don’t get 46a hack for responsibility, or 9a hats either.

    1. 9a and 46a are synonym clues. “He wears a lot of hats around here.” basically is saying that this person is responsible for a lot of things. “Hack” is a lot more direct definition – “He can’t hack being a systems manager.” is the same idea as “He can’t cope with being a systems manager.”

  2. 7:31 for me… once I remembered it’s Valentine’s Day today, the theme popped into my head and that sped me up quite a bit.

    It always makes me smile to see ASTA in a puzzle, the Thin Man movies are some of our favorites. Can’t remember the last time DARIA appeared… I miss that show, it was kinda silly like so much of Mike Judge’s stuff, but there was also a lot of “real talk” about teenagers growing up and was often very touching.

    Cathy: 46a was a weird clue to be sure, but if a task is too much for a person it’s said that they “can’t hack it” which is where I think that’s from. And in 9a, HATS is as in “take off your engineering hat and put on your management hat,” so that’s the metaphor.

  3. What a difference a day makes! One Google yesterday, and 8 today. Too many youngster expressions. Had “ambulance” before POLICE CAR.

    What’s with EVILLER and Worcester? Is that the British or Massachusetts spelling?

  4. I started out thinking I wasn’t going to finish, but got the job done. The Charles Schultz quote I couldn’t get out of my mind was “Happiness is a warm puppy”.
    I grew up in Mr. Schultz’ adopted home town of Santa Rosa. I spent many a weekend night in his ice arena as a teenager, and he could often be seen there. He was known to be very well-grounded, generous, and unpretentious-a true gentleman.

  5. 20:21 and 4 errors: DARIA/SADR CITY and OPAH/HAB. Two complete naticks there. Glad this week’s almost over, I’m about through with this mess…

  6. No real difficulty with today’s grid. And Mr. Schulz got it exactly right, chocolate (and I’d add love) can make any day a little better.

    Now on to the WSJ.

  7. Didn’t get out of jail on this one. I totally threw the towel in about half way through. And the “all you need is love” only reminded me of the Beatles song. So……..good bye Friday!

  8. We could drag only 90% (letter basis) out of it. I was a little bit disappointed that I
    couldn’t get all of the Peanuts quotes. Made a good try with help from the old
    dictionary that I use, but just couldn’t hack it. I actually feel good about the attempt,
    though.

    I wish no one would quit trying; I like the comments. I don’t try to compete with any
    of the times, because we are way too slow, but I would not miss trying. It feels really
    good to solve whatever we can solve.

    Kudos until Monday. If my smart son-in-law lawyer comes over tomorrow, he will most
    probably solve it. He uses a pencil with an eraser. I marvel at his skill as well as yours.

  9. Mostly easy Friday for me; took 36 minutes with no errors. I was mostly doing fine until I put in toto instead of ASTA, which I knew. I also misspelled the end of Hannibal and I initially had EVILest, until I changed it to the suspect EVILLER. Those issues probably added 10 minutes to my time, but the rest was fairly straight-forward.

    On to Saturday…

  10. Greetings y’all!🦆

    Easy Friday for me; no errors. The only real issue was OPAH/HAB … wasn’t 100% sure of either and almost put LAB, like Allen. I think OPAH means something in Greek so I had my doubts but I think we’ve seen that fish in puzzles before….🐡

    Is it inappropriate of me to say that I don’t particularly like Peanuts??! Not a fan of cartoons or comics in general. 🤔 Hope that doesn’t get me banned here…😮

    Be well ~~🍸

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