LA Times Crossword 16 Feb 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: Ed Sessa
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Change for a Buck

Themed answers each include the letter string “HORSE”, but with the order changed:

  • 102A 1971 Stones hit, or what can be found in the answers to starred clues : WILD HORSES
  • 26A *Ball game record : SCORESHEET
  • 37A *One may be six feet long : HERO SANDWICH
  • 55A *Historic site in Paris’ Latin Quarter : THE SORBONNE
  • 72A *Epithet for a fair British maiden : ENGLISH ROSE
  • 87A *Totally ripped : TORN TO SHREDS
  • 16D *Car coolant carrier : RADIATOR HOSE
  • 61D *Tourist’s eye-opening experience, perhaps : CULTURE SHOCK

Bill’s time: 16m 23s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

7 Queens stadium namesake : ASHE

Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, New York opened in 1997 and for years was the largest outdoor, tennis-only venue in the world. The stadium was often criticized for not having a retractable dome to protect the playing surface from inclement weather. Well, that changed in 2016 when the stadium debuted its new retractable roof, a $150 million investment in the facility.

11 HUN neighbor, to the IOC : CRO

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) uses its own set of three-letter abbreviations for country names, e.g. HUN (Hungary), ECU (Ecuador), ESP (Spain) and CRO (Croatia).

19 Reading disorder : ALEXIA

Dyslexia is a disorder in which someone of normal intelligence has difficulty reading. If a person who can read normally loses that capability, then the disorder is referred to as alexia.

20 Car thief’s contact : CHOP SHOP

After a car is stolen it might be delivered to a “chop shop”, a workshop that can break up the vehicle so that it can be sold for parts.

22 Cremona strings master : AMATI

The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, the two brothers were succeeded by Girolamo’s son Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

Cremona is a city in Lombardy in northern Italy that lies on the Po river. Cremona has a rich musical history and was the home to famous craftsmen who made stringed instruments, including Stradivari and several members of the Amati family.

23 How to handle fine china : GENTLY

The ceramic known as “porcelain” can be referred to as “china” or “fine china”, as porcelain was developed in China.

29 One way to solve crosswords : IN INK

Arthur Wynne is generally credited with the invention of what we now known as a crossword puzzle. Wynne was born in Liverpool, England and emigrated to the US when he was 19-years-old. He worked as a journalist and was living in Cedar Grove, New Jersey in 1913 when he introduced a “Word-Cross Puzzle” in his page of puzzles written for the “New York World”. The first book of crossword puzzles was published by Shuster & Shuster, in 1924. The collection of puzzles was a huge hit, and crosswords were elevated to the level of “a craze” in 1924 and 1925.

30 Nomadic Kenyans : MASAI

The Masai (also “Maasai”) are a semi-nomadic people found in Kenya and Tanzania. They are semi-nomadic in that over the years they have been migrating from the Lower Nile Valley in northwest Kenya, and are moving into Tanzania.

33 __ New Guinea : PAPUA

Papua New Guinea is a country occupying the eastern half of the island of New Guinea (the western side of the island is part of Indonesia).

37 *One may be six feet long : HERO SANDWICH

“Hero” is another name for a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name “hero” was coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the “New York Herald Tribune” when he wrote that “one had to be a hero” to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

42 Asian holiday : TET

The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning “Feast of the First Morning”, with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

49 Music to a matador’s ears : OLE!

The term “torero” is used to describe all bullfighters. The term “matador” is reserved for the bullfighter whose job is to make the final kill. Aptly enough, “matador” is Spanish for “killer”.

54 Apple starter : CRAN-

A blend of cranberry and apple juice is sold by Ocean Spray as Cran-Apple juice.

55 *Historic site in Paris’ Latin Quarter : THE SORBONNE

“Sorbonne” is the name usually used for the old University of Paris, and some of the institutions that have succeeded it. The institution was named for French theologian Robert de Sorbonne who founded the original Collège de Sorbonne in 1257. That’s quite a while ago …

58 Indian title of respect : SAHIB

“Sahib” is most recognized as a term of address used in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use “mister” in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

63 “The Great Dictator” Oscar nominee Jack : OAKIE

Jack Oakie was the stage name of actor Lewis Offield, who was originally from Missouri. Offield was raised in Oklahoma, and for this reason picked up the nickname “Oakie”. The “Jack” in his stage name came from the first character that he portrayed in a play. Oakie played Benzino Napaloni in Charlie Chaplin’s “The Great Dictator”, a character who was very much based on Italian dictator Benito Mussolini.

“The Great Dictator” is a 1940 movie starring Charlie Chaplin, who also wrote, directed, produced and scored the film. Made just before the US entered WWII, “The Great Dictator” is a satirical work that condemns Hitler, Mussolini and the rise of fascism. It was to become Chaplin’s most commercially successful film. Years after it was released, Chaplin stated that he could not have made the movie if he known at the time just how truly horrific were the crimes committed by the Nazis.

65 Either of two Indy 500 racers : AL UNSER

The Unser family seems to have auto racing in their blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

69 Sheik’s land, in song : ARABY

“The Sheik of Araby” is a song that dates back to 1921, when it was a Tin Pan Alley hit. It was soon absorbed into the jazz standard repertoire. The inspiration of the song was Rudolph Valentino’s performance in the 1921 movie “The Sheik”.

71 Baltic people : LETTS

Latvia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs). People from Latvia are called Letts.

The natives of modern day Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia are sometimes referred to as Balts, a reference to the Baltic Sea on which the three countries lie. The term “Balt” is also used for someone who speaks one of the Baltic languages, a group of languages spoken by people mainly residing within the borders of Latvia and Lithuania, as well as in some immigrant communities around the world.

72 *Epithet for a fair British maiden : ENGLISH ROSE

An epithet is a word or phrase used in a name to describe the quality of the person or thing bearing that name. For example, King Richard I was also known as Richard the Lionheart. The term “epithet” can also describe a word that is disparaging or abusive.

75 Yucatán “you” : USTED

Yucatán is one of Mexico’s 31 states and is located in the east of the country, on the northern tip of the Yucatán peninsula.

81 __ Lingus : AER

Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn’t that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with “Aer Lingus” being a phonetic spelling of the Irish “aer-loingeas” meaning “air fleet”. These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland’s oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline Ryanair.

82 “The Jungle” author Sinclair : UPTON

Upton Sinclair was a prolific American author, with almost 100 books to his name. Sinclair’s most famous work is probably “The Jungle”, a 1906 novel about the meatpacking industry. Revelations in “The Jungle” contributed to the Meat Inspection Act being passed by Congress a few months after the book was published. Sinclair also wrote “Oil”, published in 1927, which was the basis of the 2007 film “There Will Be Blood” that stars Daniel Day-Lewis.

83 Smoothie berry : ACAI

Açaí (pronounced “ass-aye-ee”) is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

91 Woodwind piece : REED

Woodwind instruments are a subcategory of wind instruments that were traditionally made of wood, although some are now made from metal. There are two main classes of woodwind: flutes and reed instruments. Flutes produce sound by blowing air across the edge of a hole in a cylindrical tube. Reed instruments produce sounds by blowing into a mouthpiece, which then directs the air over a reed or reeds, causing them to vibrate.

92 Courtroom pro : STENO

Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek “steno” (narrow) and “graphe” (writing).

94 “The Black Cat” author : POE

“The Black Cat” is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe that was first published in 1843. It is a dark tale about a man who murders his wife and is taunted by the couple’s black cat.

95 Blood of the gods : ICHOR

Ichor is a golden fluid that is the blood of the gods in Greek mythology.

97 First name in furniture : ETHAN

Ethan Allen was one of the founders of the state of Vermont. Allen was also a hero in the American Revolutionary War, famous for leading (along with Benedict Arnold) the small band of men known as the Green Mountain Boys that captured Fort Ticonderoga. And yes, the Ethan Allen store and furniture line is named for Ethan Allen the patriot, even though he had nothing to do with the furniture business.

102 1971 Stones hit, or what can be found in the answers to starred clues : WILD HORSES

“Wild Horses” is a 1971 song released by the Rolling Stones. There’s a 1995 music video that’s quite cool featuring the Stones performing an acoustic version.

108 Mix thoroughly, as oil and vinegar : EMULSIFY

An emulsion is a mixture of two liquids, two liquids that don’t easily mix. Examples are milk (water and fat), mayonnaise (oil and water) and vinaigrette (oil and vinegar). Mixture of such liquids requires the presence of an emulsifier, a substance that stabilizes the emulsion so that separation does not occur. Examples of emulsifiers are egg yolk and mustard.

110 “Rabbit” series author : UPDIKE

The novelist John Updike’s most famous work is the Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom series of books. Updike is one of only three authors who has won more than one Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and he did so for two of his “Rabbit” books.

The 1960 novel by John Updike called “Rabbit Run” tells the story of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom as he tries to escape from his constraining, middle-class life. “Rabbit Run” is the first in a series of novels from Updike that feature the “Rabbit” character, the others being:

“Rabbit Redux”
“Rabbit is Rich”
“Rabbit at Rest”
“Rabbit Remembered”

111 Musician Minaj : NICKI

Nicki Minaj is a rapper from the New York borough of Queens who was born in Trinidad.

112 Poppycock : NONSENSE

It is thought that the relatively gentle term “poppycock”, meaning “nonsense”, comes from a Dutch word for “dung” combined with a Latin word for “excrete”. Not so gentle after all …

113 E Street Band notable Van Zandt : STEVEN

The character Silvio Dante on HBO’s excellent series “The Sopranos” really is comical looking. He has dyed hair, possibly a wig that’s truly “big hair”, and all the jewelry and mannerisms that one possibly does not expect from a Consigliere. “Sil” is played by actor Steven Van Zandt, who is also a member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band, in which he plays the guitar and mandolin.

114 Hydrocarbon group : ALKYL

An alkyl group is an alkane that is missing one hydrogen atom. For example, the methyl group is CH3-, and the methane molecule is CH4.

Down

2 Actor Guinness : ALEC

Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered (sadly, I think) for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars”.

3 Like cobras, but not pythons : VENOMOUS

“Cobra” is the name given to a group of snakes, some of which are in different families. The term is reserved for those snakes that can expand their neck ribs to create a hood. The name “cobra” is an abbreviated form of “cobra de capello” which translates from Portuguese as “snake with hood”.

Pythons form a genus of non-venomous, constricting snakes that have flecked skin and a long split tongue. Pythons are native to Africa and Asia, although thousands of pythons live in the Everglades National Park as an invasive species, presumably as the result of pet pythons escaping into the wild.

4 Web system allowing outside access : EXTRANET

An intranet is a computer network that has limited access, usually only to members of a particular organization. An extranet is like an intranet, but is structured to allow access to authorized parties outside of the organization.

5 Frasier’s brother : NILES

In the sitcom called “Frasier”, Niles Crane is the brother of the title character Frasier Crane. Frasier is played by Kelsey Grammer and Niles is played by David Hyde Pierce. Frasier was originally intended to be an only child in the show’s storyline, but the producers decided to add a brother when they noted the remarkable similarity in appearance between David Hyde Pierce and Kelsey Grammer.

10 Lead monitor, for short : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

11 Word with line or hound : CHOW …

“Chow” is a slang term for food that originated in California in the mid-1800s. “Chow” comes from the Chinese pidgin English “chow-chow” meaning “food”.

13 Slanted column : OP-ED PIECE

“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

14 Islamic leaders : CALIPHS

“Caliph” is an Arabic word meaning “successor”. In the Islamic tradition, a caliph is a leader who is deemed to be a successor of Muhammad.

17 Thames campus : ETON

The world-famous Eton College is located just outside London. It lies between the River Thames, and the Jubilee River. The Jubilee is a 7-mile stretch of man-made waterway that was built in the late 1990s to take overflow from the Thames and reduce flooding around the nearby towns.

27 “… __ you home to dinner”: Shak. : HIE

Here are some lines from William Shakespeare’s play “The Comedy of Errors”:

Your worship’s wife, my mistress at the Phoenix,
She that doth fast till you come home to dinner
And prays that you will hie you home to dinner.

32 Flat fish : RAY

Rays are fish with flattened bodies that have gill slits on their underside. There are many, many species of ray, including stingrays and skates. Rays are close relatives of sharks, with both being cartilaginous fish, as opposed to bony fish.

35 Motion maker: Abbr. : ATT

Attorney (att.)

38 Mrs. Gorbachev : RAISA

Raisa Gorbacheva was the wife of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. There’s no doubt that Raisa’s charm and personality helped her husband as he worked to change the image of the Soviet Union.

41 Weimaraner’s complaint : WHINE

The Weimaraner was originally bred for hunting large game such as bears, boars and deer, and is now classed as a gun dog. The breed gets its name from Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, as he was big into hunting.

43 Eatery seen in the film “Manhattan” : ELAINE’S

Elaine’s was a bar and restaurant on the Upper East Side of Manhattan that was a regular haunt for celebrity New Yorkers until it closed its doors in 2011. Elaine’s was famous for hosting an Oscar night where the elite and famous would watch the Academy Award ceremony each year. The restaurant gets a mention in the Billy Joel song “Big Shot”, and is also featured in the Woody Allen movie “Manhattan”.

44 Car and Driver yearly listing : TEN-BEST

“Car and Driver” is an automotive magazine published in Ann Arbor, Michigan. “Car and Driver” first appeared in 1955, when it was called “Sports Cars Illustrated”.

46 Can’t brook : DETESTS

“To brook” and “to abide” both mean “to tolerate, to put up with”.

51 Number of singers in The Chipmunks : THREE

Alvin and the Chipmunks is a cartoon musical group that was created for the recording of a novelty song in 1958 called “The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don’t Be Late)”. The three Chipmunks (Alvin, Simon and Theodore) were all voiced by singer Ross Bagdasarian, Sr. but with a speedy playback to create high-pitched voices.

53 Cans for cons : POKEYS

“Pokey” (also “poky”) is a slang term for prison. It might be a corruption of “pogie”, a term for a “poorhouse”.

54 Jeweler’s measure : CARAT

The carat is a unit of mass equal to 200 mg. It is used in sizing gemstones.

56 Clown mascot’s first name : RONALD

“Fast Food Nation” is an expose by investigative journalist Eric Schlosser that reveals in the inner workings of the US fast food industry. One of Schlosser’s more controversial findings was the deliberate targeting of children by the marketing folks at McDonald’s. McDonald’s copied the marketing plans of Walt Disney to attract not only children, but also their parents and grandparents. That’s how Ronald McDonald was born …

57 Thumper’s friend : BAMBI

Thumper is a rabbit in the Disney animated feature “Bambi”.

58 Evening parties : SOIREES

“Soir” is the French word for “evening” and a soirée is an evening party. The French word “soirée” has an acute accent over the first “e”, but we tend to drop this when using the word in English.

60 Property recipient, in legal language : ALIENEE

An alienee is one to whom ownership of property is transferred, alienated.

64 Crayola color renamed Peach in 1962 : FLESH

Crayola has made the decision to rename colors of crayons a few times, often with a nod to changing attitudes in society. Some examples are:

  • “Flesh” to “Peach” (1962 … not all flesh is peach-colored!)
  • “Prussian Blue” to “Midnight Blue” (1958 … as the Cold War was raging)
  • “Indian Red” to “Chestnut” (1999 … even though the name wasn’t a reference to “American Indian”)

66 Like a “Stat!” instruction : URGENT

The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

69 Composer Bruckner : ANTON

Anton Bruckner was an Austrian composer. He’s no favorite of mine as he embraces the use of dissonances (I’m a sober traditionalist!). Bruckner’s “Symphony No. 7” is perhaps his most popular work. He created a slow and mournful movement for the work in recognition of the impending death of Richard Wagner, whom he greatly admired.

70 Links army leader : ARNIE

Arnold Palmer was one of the greats of the world of golf. He was very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers were usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”. Off the course, Palmer was an avid pilot until his latter years. He resided in Latrobe, Pennsylvania for much of the year and the local airport is named in his honor: Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

72 Ovarian hormones : ESTROGENS

The primary female sex hormone is estrogen (also “oestrogen”). The “estrogen” comes from the Greek “oistros” meaning “verve, inspiration” and the suffix “-gen” meaning “producer of”.

73 Frosty coat : HOAR

The Old English word “har” meant “gray, venerable, old”, and came into English as “hoar” (and later “hoary”) with the same meaning. The term “hoar-frost” dates back to the 13th century, and reflects the similarity of the white feathers of frost to the gray/white of an old man’s beard.

77 Manhattan, say : BAR ORDER

The cocktail called a Manhattan is made from whiskey, sweet vermouth and Angostura bitters. I favor my own version of a brandy Manhattan, using brandy, sweet vermouth and orange bitters.

79 Peggy or Brenda of song : LEE

Peggy Lee was a jazz and popular music singer from Jamestown, North Dakota. “Peggy Lee” was a stage name, as she was born Norma Egstrom. She was a successful songwriter as well as singer, and supplied several numbers for the Disney movie “Lady and the Tramp”. Lee also sang in the film and voiced four of the characters.

Brenda Lee is a country and rockabilly singer who had 37 songs that made the charts in the sixties. Lee’s biggest hits are probably “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” from 1958, and “I’m Sorry” from 1960. Lee was only 13 years old when she recorded “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree”.

80 Hallucinogenic letters : LSD

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist named Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

83 Japan’s largest active volcano : ASO

Mount Aso is the largest active volcano in Japan and is found on the island of Kyushu.

88 Cars that sound like gems : OPELS

Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we’d say “estate car” in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

90 Run down a mountain : SCHUSS

A schuss is a very fast run downhill in skiing, one with no turns taken to slow the pace of the descent. “Schuss” is a German word for “shot”.

97 Italian hot spot : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcano in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts. It is sometimes referred to as “Mongibello” in Italian, and as “Mungibeddu” in Sicilian. The English name “Etna” comes from the Greek “aitho” meaning “I eat”.

100 Berserk : AMOK

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had a good reason for that frenzy …

101 Pueblo people : ZUNI

The Zuni are a Pueblo people. They live on the Zuni River in western New Mexico, a tributary of the Little Colorado River.

104 Soapmaker’s supplies : LYES

Soap is basically made by adding a strong alkali (like lye) to a fat (like olive oil or palm oil). The fats break down in the basic solution in a process called saponification. The crude soap is extracted from the mixture, washed, purified and finished in molds.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Ports in a storm : HAVENS
7 Queens stadium namesake : ASHE
11 HUN neighbor, to the IOC : CRO
14 Wasn’t indifferent : CARED
19 Reading disorder : ALEXIA
20 Car thief’s contact : CHOP SHOP
22 Cremona strings master : AMATI
23 How to handle fine china : GENTLY
24 “In your dreams!” : NOT A HOPE!
25 Encouraged through chicanery : LED ON
26 *Ball game record : SCORESHEET
28 Was indebted to : OWED
29 One way to solve crosswords : IN INK
30 Nomadic Kenyans : MASAI
31 Need an eraser, say : ERR
33 __ New Guinea : PAPUA
35 Near-eternity : AEON
37 *One may be six feet long : HERO SANDWICH
42 Asian holiday : TET
45 Leveled, with “up” : TRUED …
47 Like many indie films : ARTY
48 Some interruptions : AHEMS
49 Music to a matador’s ears : OLE!
50 “Try it” : TASTE THIS
53 Diner menu info : PRICE
54 Apple starter : CRAN-
55 *Historic site in Paris’ Latin Quarter : THE SORBONNE
58 Indian title of respect : SAHIB
59 Early Earth life forms : BACTERIA
63 “The Great Dictator” Oscar nominee Jack : OAKIE
64 As an example : FOR ONE
65 Either of two Indy 500 racers : AL UNSER
66 Not fulfilled : UNMET
67 Wanted poster listings : ALIASES
68 Weaken : DILUTE
69 Sheik’s land, in song : ARABY
70 Most ready for trouble : ALERTEST
71 Baltic people : LETTS
72 *Epithet for a fair British maiden : ENGLISH ROSE
74 Burden : ONUS
75 Yucatán “you” : USTED
76 Ready for trouble : ON THE BALL
81 __ Lingus : AER
82 “The Jungle” author Sinclair : UPTON
83 Smoothie berry : ACAI
85 Reliever’s stat : SAVES
86 Born, in some bios : NEE
87 *Totally ripped : TORN TO SHREDS
91 Woodwind piece : REED
92 Courtroom pro : STENO
94 “The Black Cat” author : POE
95 Blood of the gods : ICHOR
97 First name in furniture : ETHAN
99 Intent look : GAZE
102 1971 Stones hit, or what can be found in the answers to starred clues : WILD HORSES
107 Level and plane : TOOLS
108 Mix thoroughly, as oil and vinegar : EMULSIFY
110 “Rabbit” series author : UPDIKE
111 Musician Minaj : NICKI
112 Poppycock : NONSENSE
113 E Street Band notable Van Zandt : STEVEN
114 Hydrocarbon group : ALKYL
115 Enjoy a run, perhaps : SKI
116 Director’s challenges : EGOS
117 Most affected by a workout : SOREST

Down

1 Baddies with pointy hats : HAGS
2 Actor Guinness : ALEC
3 Like cobras, but not pythons : VENOMOUS
4 Web system allowing outside access : EXTRANET
5 Frasier’s brother : NILES
6 Obeys a stick-wielding doctor : SAYS “AH”
7 Bad marks in high school? : ACNE
8 “If it fits” item : SHOE
9 Most popular : HOTTEST
10 Lead monitor, for short : EPA
11 Word with line or hound : CHOW
12 Climbing gear : ROPE
13 Slanted column : OP-ED PIECE
14 Islamic leaders : CALIPHS
15 “Can we see __?”: diner’s request : A MENU
16 *Car coolant carrier : RADIATOR HOSE
17 Thames campus : ETON
18 Tennis drop shot : DINK
21 Fleeced : SHORN
27 “… __ you home to dinner”: Shak. : HIE
32 Flat fish : RAY
34 Summit : ACME
35 Motion maker: Abbr. : ATT
36 Period of time : ERA
38 Mrs. Gorbachev : RAISA
39 Roughly : OR SO
40 “Shoot!” : DARN IT!
41 Weimaraner’s complaint : WHINE
43 Eatery seen in the film “Manhattan” : ELAINE’S
44 Car and Driver yearly listing : TEN BEST
46 Can’t brook : DETESTS
51 Number of singers in The Chipmunks : THREE
52 Estate beneficiary : HEIR
53 Cans for cons : POKEYS
54 Jeweler’s measure : CARAT
56 Clown mascot’s first name : RONALD
57 Thumper’s friend : BAMBI
58 Evening parties : SOIREES
59 Banking misjudgment : BAD LOAN
60 Property recipient, in legal language : ALIENEE
61 *Tourist’s eye-opening experience, perhaps : CULTURE SHOCK
62 Letter-shaped fasteners : T-NUTS
64 Crayola color renamed Peach in 1962 : FLESH
66 Like a “Stat!” instruction : URGENT
67 Way more than some : A LOT
69 Composer Bruckner : ANTON
70 Links army leader : ARNIE
72 Ovarian hormones : ESTROGENS
73 Frosty coat : HOAR
75 Knowledgeable about : UP ON
77 Manhattan, say : BAR ORDER
78 Causing avoidance : AVERSIVE
79 Peggy or Brenda of song : LEE
80 Hallucinogenic letters : LSD
82 Fork, for instance : UTENSIL
83 Japan’s largest active volcano : ASO
84 Pondering, with “on” : CHEWING …
88 Cars that sound like gems : OPELS
89 “__ you really just say that?” : DID
90 Run down a mountain : SCHUSS
93 Blathering : TALKY
96 “__ it!”: “Get moving!” : HOP TO
97 Italian hot spot : ETNA
98 Hard work : TOIL
100 Berserk : AMOK
101 Pueblo people : ZUNI
103 “That being the case … ” : IF SO …
104 Soapmaker’s supplies : LYES
105 Just makes, with “out” : EKES …
106 Mailed : SENT
109 Watch : SEE

15 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 16 Feb 20, Sunday”

  1. 1:02:08 with one error…I spelled Unser as Uncer . That makes an entire weekend with errors in every puzzle….in addition there were 2 trips to the DMV, a roof that sprung a leak and a cavity under a crown.
    Its got to get better right?

  2. No errors but took a long time. I don’t think I ever heard anyone say
    the word “alertest”….my computer doesn’t even like it; underlines it in
    red as though it is a misspelling.

    1. Mary, I think ALERTEST is wrong! The rule is that if an adjective has two syllables you can form the superlative adding -EST only if the adjective ends in -le or -y and then only if the second syllable is stressed. Gentle -> gentlest; happy -> happiest, of course. Instead of ALERTEST the correct form is MOST ALERT.

      More info than you need!!😁

  3. 18:30 for me, I’m so used to circled letters in this kind of “embedded” theme that it threw me for a minute, but fortunately I’m up on my Rolling Stones so when I worked my way around to there, the working backwards was a little easier.

    I also didn’t know ALIENEE (what a weird term) and Jack OAKIE stumped me for a while… I’ve never seen “the Great Dictator” other than that famous ending speech at the end by Charlie Chaplin.

  4. Had a very bad three days here, including this Sunday puzzle. Hope I’m not losing it! Maybe next week will give me some relief. One can only hope.

    Also found the NYT really, really hard for a change. Last few Sundays have been “kind” but not anymore I guess. Alas, alas.

  5. Hello folks!!🦆

    No errors on a fun Sunday puzzle. Haven’t done a Sunday in awhile, but I had time for it today. Didn’t even notice or look for the theme. 🤔

    I had LATTS for a time before I caught my mistake! I remembered LETTS finally from previous puzzles….wasn’t sure of SCHUSS; then it took me FOREVER to come up with SOREST, even tho I had SO_EST….!! Guess I haven’t been to the gym for awhile. 😮

    Be well~~🍺

  6. Please! Someone explain what BUCKS in the title has to do with anything! We get the HORSE anagrams, but are at a loss as to how BUCKS connects with it!

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