LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Dec 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Amy Johnson
THEME: Extra! Extra! … when we speak the words starting each of today’s themed answers, we hear a famous riddle, i.e. WHAT’S BLACK AND WHITE AND RED (read) ALL OVER?

118A. Answer to the spoken riddle hidden in the answers to starred clues A NEWSPAPER

23A. *Bugs line WHAT’S UP DOC?
28A. *Classic novel with the chapter “My Breaking In” BLACK BEAUTY
37A. *”End of discussion!” AND THAT’S FINAL!
51A. *John Adams’ home after the Market Street mansion WHITE HOUSE
68A. *”That’s how the cookie crumbles” AND SO IT GOES
88A. *Whodunit staple RED HERRING
96A. *Soap set in Pine Valley, Pennsylvania ALL MY CHILDREN
105A. *No spring chicken OVER THE HILL

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 50s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Duchamp genre DADA
Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

Marcel Duchamp was a French artist whose works are associated with the Dadaist and Surrealist movements. One of his most celebrated “works” is simply what he called “readymade” art, a urinal which he titled “Fountain”. Even though this work is considered to be “a major landmark in 20th century art”, the original that was submitted for exhibition was never actually displayed and had been lost forever. Replicas were commissioned by Duchamp, and are on display in many museums around the world. I have no further comment …

20. Moose meeting place LODGE
The fraternal organization known as the Loyal Order of Moose was founded in 1888 in Louisville, Kentucky as men’s social club. Local units of the society are called “lodges”, the national authority is known as the “Supreme Lodge of the World”, and the entire membership is referred to as the “Moose Domain”.

22. Munch Museum city OSLO
Edvard Munch was a Norwegian expressionist, most famous for his painting “The Scream”, painted in 1893. What a wonderful work that is, a true representation of expressionism. The Munch Museum in Oslo is dedicated to his work and life. In 2004, two of Munch’s paintings, “The Scream” and “Madonna”, were stolen from the Munch Museum by armed robbers who subdued the museum guards. The paintings were missing for two years, but recovered in 2006.

23. *Bugs line WHAT’S UP, DOC?
Bugs Bunny first said “What’s up, Doc?” in the 1940 cartoon short “A Wild Hare”, addressing the hunter Elmer Fudd.

25. Seat of New York’s Oneida County UTICA
Utica in New York is known as “Second Chance City” these days, due to the recent influx of refugees from war-torn parts of the world and from Bosnia in particular. These immigrants have helped revitalize the area and reverse a trend of population loss.

27. Martha’s Vineyard papers GAZETTES
The ”Vineyard Gazette” is a newspaper that has been circulating on the island of Martha’s Vineyard since 1846, when it was founded by Edgar Merchant. The Merchant family owned the paper until 1920.

Martha’s Vineyard is a relatively large island located south of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. “Martha’s Vineyard” was originally the name of a smaller island to the south, named by English explorer Bartholomew Gosnold in 1602. The name was eventually transferred to the main island, and is now the eighth-oldest English place-name still used in the US. It is likely that the Gosnold named the island for his daughter Martha.

28. *Classic novel with the chapter “My Breaking In” BLACK BEAUTY
English novelist Anna Sewell wrote only one book in her life, the immensely popular “Black Beauty” first published in 1877. The book was written at the tail end of Sewell’s life, over a period of six years while her health was declining. “Black Beauty” was an immediate success, and is supposedly the sixth best-selling title in the English language. Sewell died just five months after the book was published, but she did get to see its initial success.

30. Babs Bunny, e.g. DOE
An adult male rabbit is called a “buck”, and an adult female is a “doe”. A young rabbit is a “kitten” or “kit”.

Babs and Buster Bunny are the cartoon stars of the TV show “Tiny Toon Adventures”. Babs and Buster act a lot like Bugs Bunny, although they are no relation.

31. Website for techies CNET
c|net is an excellent technology website. c|net started out in 1994 as a television network specializing in technology news. The host of “American Idol”, Ryan Seacrest, started off his career as host of a c|net show.

34. Title teacher in a 1967 film SIR
“To Sir, with Love” is an excellent 1967 drama film starring Sidney Poitier that is based on a novel of the same name by E. R. Braithwaite. The film is about an inexperienced teacher in a tough school in the East End of London. If you see the movie keep a lookout for a couple of supporting actors. Lulu plays the student called Babs Pegg, and also sings the hit theme song from the movie. Patricia Routledge plays fellow teacher Clinty Clintridge, and later in her career played Hyacinth Bucket in the enduring BBC comedy series “Keeping Up Appearances”.

43. Guinea pig, e.g. PET
The guinea pig species of rodent is also known as a cavy. Guinea pigs aren’t related to pigs, and not are they from Guinea (in West Africa). Guinea pigs actually come from the Andes. They were commonly used for research in the 1800s and 1900s, and as a result we use the term “guinea pig” for a test subject to this day.

46. Part of a Latin trio AMAS
“Amo, amas, amat” … “I love, you love, he/she/it loves”, in Latin.

51. *John Adams’ home after the Market Street mansion WHITE HOUSE
The White House was designed by an Irishman, I am proud to say. James Hoban from County Kilkenny emigrated to the US in his twenties, and won the design competition for the White House in 1792.

After George Washington was inaugurated as president in 1789, he lived in the Samuel Osgood House and then the Alexander Macomb House in New York City. When the capital moved to Philadelphia, President Washington occupied the Market Street Mansion, as did his successor John Adams. President Adams moved to the White House in the nation’s new capital in 1800.

54. Air quality concern SMOG
“Smog” is a portmanteau formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s.

55. Sounds heard with a stethoscope RALES
A “rale” is a crackling sound in the lungs that can be picked up by a stethoscope, and is an indication of respiratory disease. A diseased lung often has collapsed airways and pockets that contain fluid. The crackling sound is caused by the collapsed structures popping open. OUr word “rale” comes from the French “râle” meaning “rattle”.

57. Hyundai sedan SONATA
The Sonata is made by Hyundai. The Hyundai factory in Ulsan, South Korea is the largest integrated automobile manufacturing facility in the world, able to produce 1.6 million vehicles each year.

60. Agcy. with facilities in Denver and West Point US MINT
Mint marks are inscribed on coins to indicate where the coin was minted. In the US, the current mint marks are:

– “P” for the Philadelphia Mint
– “D” for the Denver Mint
– “S” for the San Francisco Mint
– “W” for the West Point Mint

61. Ben Jonson epitaph words O RARE
Ben Jonson was a contemporary of William Shakespeare and just like Shakespeare, Jonson was a dramatist, poet and actor. Jonson is buried in Poet’s Corner in Westminster Abbey in London. The inscription on the slab covering his grave reads ” O Rare Ben Jonson”. There is much debate over the meaning of the inscription. Does it mean what it says, “Oh, you rare one, Ben Jonson!”, or should the inscription really be “Orare Ben Jonson”, translating from Latin into “Pray for Ben Jonson”. A conundrum indeed …

63. Like pre-Easter diets LENTEN
In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed “quadragesima” (meaning “fortieth”), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term “Lent” was introduced. “Lent” comes from “lenz”, the German word for “spring”.

65. Comédie part ACTE
In French, an act (acte) is part of a comedy (comédie).

66. To be, in Paris ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”.

72. Hardy heroine TESS
The full name of Thomas Hardy’s 1891 novel is “Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented”. When it was originally published, “Tess …” received very mixed reviews, largely because it addresses some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (society’s attitude towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski’s “Tess” released in 1979. Polanski apparently made “Tess” because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy’s novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that simply reads “To Sharon”.

73. Capone nemesis NESS
Eliot Ness was the Treasury agent charged with the task of bringing down the notorious Chicago gangster Al Capone. When Ness took on the job in 1930, Chicago law-enforcement agents were renowned for being corrupt, for being on the take. Ness handpicked 50 prohibition agents who he thought he could rely on, later reducing the group to a cadre of 15 and ultimately just 11 trusted men. That group of 11 earned the nickname “The Untouchables”, the agents who couldn’t be bought.

74. Everett of “Citizen Kane” SLOANE
Everett Sloane was an actor from New York City. On the big screen, Sloane is remembered for playing Bernstein in “Citizen Kane”. He also voiced the title character in 130 episodes of “The Dick Tracy Show” cartoon show in the 1960s. Sadly, Sloane committed suicide in 1965, fearing that he was going blind.

75. Cryptic letters RUNES
A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

79. Quake danger TSUNAMI
“Tsunami” is a Japanese word meaning “harbor wave”.

86. Baker with Grammys ANITA
Anita Baker is an R&B and soul singer who was raised in Detroit, Michigan. Baker’s most successful song is the Grammy-winning “Sweet Love” released in 1986.

87. BC and Cal, e.g. SCHS
Boston College is a private Jesuit school located in Chestnut Hill, just a few miles from Boston, Massachusetts. The list of notable Boston College alumni includes Secretary of State John Kerry and former Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill.

The University of California, Berkeley (Cal) is the most difficult public university to get into in the world. It opened in 1869 and is named for Anglo-Irish philosopher George Berkeley.

88. *Whodunit staple RED HERRING
The exact origin of the term “red herring”, meaning “something that misleads”, isn’t known. The most common explanation for the use of the phrase is that kippers (strong-smelling smoked herrings) were used to by fugitives to distract bloodhounds who were on their trail. Kippers become red-colored during the smoking process, and are no longer “white herrings”.

91. Popular Girl Scout cookie SAMOA
Depending on which bakery makes the particular variety of Girl Scout cookie, the name can vary. For example, Little Brownie Bakers makes the Samoa cookies, while ABC Bakers uses the same recipe and calls the cookies Caramel Delites. The assumption is that these cookies have the exotic name of “Samoa” because they contain the tropical ingredients of coconut and cocoa.

93. Indian wrap: Var. SAREE
The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

96. *Soap set in Pine Valley, Pennsylvania ALL MY CHILDREN
“All My Children” was the first daytime soap opera to debut in the seventies. Star of the show was Susan Lucci who played Erica Kane. The show was cancelled in 2011 after having being on the air for 41 years.

100. Mdse. GDS
Merchandise (mdse.) or goods (gds.)

101. Gentle treatment, briefly TLC
Tender loving care (TLC)

102. Weighty refs. OEDS
The “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) contains over 300,000 “main” entries and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb “set”. When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb “put”. Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

111. Polytheistic creed PAGANISM
A pagan is someone who holds religious beliefs that are different from the main religions of the world. In classical Latin, “paganus” was a villager, a rustic.

117. Pope’s muse ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of Lyric Poetry.

Alexander Pope was an English poet, famous for his own compositions as well as for a translation of Homer’s works. One of Pope’s most notable poems is “Ode on Solitude” that opens with:

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.

Pope wrote that when he was just twelve years old!

121. Home to the Sforza Castle MILAN
Sforza Castle in Milan is named for Francesco Sforza, the Duke of Milan who built the citadel in the 15th century. The Sforza Castle complex now houses several museums.

122. “Buckaroo Holiday” ballet RODEO
“Rodeo” is a ballet with a score by Aaron Copland that was originally choreographed by Agnes de Mille. First performed in 1942, “Rodeo” is one of the earliest examples of a truly American classical ballet.

123. Driver’s warning FORE!
No one seems to know for sure where the golfing term “fore!” comes from. It has been used at least as far back as 1881, and since then has been called out to warn other golfers that a wayward ball might be heading their way. My favorite possibility for its origin is that it is a contraction of the Gaelic warning cry “Faugh a Ballagh!” (clear the way!) which is still called out in the sport of road bowling. Road bowling is an Irish game where players bowl balls along roads between villages, trying to reach the end of the course in as few bowls as possible, just like in golf!

126. German steel hub ESSEN
Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany.

Down
1. University of Georgia athlete, familiarly DAWG
The sports teams of the University of Georgia are called the Bulldogs. The team mascot is known as Hairy Dawg. “Forbes” magazine lists Hairy Dawg as the third best Sports Mascot. Impressive …

2. Ottoman general AGHA
“Aga” (also “agha”) is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

3. Actress Cameron DIAZ
The Hollywood actress Cameron Diaz started out her professional life as a model. Diaz’s first acting role was in the 1994 film “The Mask”, starring alongside Jim Carrey.

5. Wheat protein GLUTEN
Gluten is a protein mixture found in foods processed mainly from wheat. The sticky properties of gluten are used in making bread, giving dough its elasticity and making the final product very chewy. “Gluten” is the Latin word for “glue”.

9. Sleuth, slangily TEC
“Tec” is a slang term for a private detective, a private investigator (PI).

The word “sleuth” came into English from Old Norse as far back as 1200 when it meant the “track or trail of a person”. In the mid-1800s, a sleuthhound described a keen investigator, a hound close on the trail of the suspect. Sleuthhound was shortened to “sleuth” and was used for a detective in general.

11. Prefix with ethics META-
All I can do is give the dictionary definition, because this stuff is way over my head:
Metaethics: the philosophy of ethics dealing with the meaning of ethical terms, the nature of moral discourse, and the foundations of moral principles.

13. Banjo part with frets NECK
The instrument that we know today as the banjo is a derivative of instruments that were used in Africa.

16. Jacob’s womb-mate ESAU
Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

18. Tiger with a red scarf TONY
Tony the Tiger has been the mascot of Frosted Flakes cereal since the product’s introduction in 1951. As Tony would say, “They’re Gr-r-reat!” Well, I thought they were when I was a lot younger …

24. Ancient gathering place STOA
A stoa was a covered walkway in Ancient Greece. A stoa usually consisted of columns lining the side of a building or buildings, with another row of columns defining the other side of the walkway. The columns supported a roof. Often stoae would surround marketplaces in large cities.

28. __ noir BETE
“Bête noire” translates from French as “black beast” and is used in English to describe something or someone that is disliked.

35. Letters before two cents? IMHO
In my humble opinion (IMHO)

“To put in one’s two cents” is to add one’s opinion. The American expression derives from the older English version, which is “to put in one’s two pennies worth”.

38. Brit. medal DSO
The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a British military award that is usually presented to officers with the rank of Major or higher.

52. Pilot’s update, briefly ETA
Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

53. Heckle, say HARASS
The original use of the verb “to heckle” was to mean questioning severely, and for many years was associated with the public questioning of parliamentary candidates in Scotland. In more recent times, the meaning has evolved into questioning that is less polite and that is directed at standup comics.

54. Editor’s “Leave it” STET
“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

62. Blowup: Abbr. ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

64. “I do not see why I should __ turn back”: Frost E’ER
“I do not see why I should e’er turn back” is a line from Robert Frost’s 1915 poem “Into My Own”.

70. Move nonchalantly SASHAY
To “sashay” is to strut along in a showy manner. “Sashay” is an Anglicized form of the French word “chassé”, a sliding step used in square dancing.

76. “Neither snow __ rain … ” NOR
There is no official creed or motto for the US Postal Service. However, there is the oft-quoted inscription that is posted (pun!) over the entrance to the James Farley Post Office in New York City:
Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

78. Lava rock BASALT
Basalt is a volcanic rock created when lava cools rapidly at the earth’s surface.

80. “It’s __!”: speakeasy warning A RAID
A speakeasy is an establishment that sells alcoholic drinks illegally. Speakeasies were very big in the US in the days of Prohibition. The obvious etymology, of a speakeasy owner asking his or her customers to “speak easy” so as not to draw attention to the authorities, is thought to have originated in 1888 in McKeesport just outside Pittsburgh.

81. Keyboardist Saunders and crossword immortal Reagle MERLS
Merl Saunders was a piano and keyboard musician. Saunders was good friends with Jerry Garcia and often played with the Grateful Dead.

84. Oklahoma’s “Wheat Capital” ENID
Enid, Oklahoma takes its name from the old railroad station around which the city developed. Back in 1889, that train stop was called Skeleton Station. An official who didn’t like the name changed it to Enid Station, using a character from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King”. Maybe if he hadn’t changed the name, the city of Enid would now be called Skeleton, Oklahoma! Enid has the nickname “Queen Wheat City” because is has a huge capacity for storing grain, the third largest grain storage capacity in the world.

85. LAPD ranks SGTS
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the third largest local law enforcement agency in the country, after New York PD and Chicago PD. Among other things, LAPD is famous for creating the first Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team in the US, in 1965.

87. Tee sizes, initially SML
Small, medium and large (S, M & L)

92. Speculative lead-to-gold practice ALCHEMY
One of the main goals of the ancient practice of alchemy was to change base metals into gold, a process known as transmutation.

93. Author Silverstein SHEL
Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

97. Eyes in texts COLONS
An emoticon is a glyph created using text characters to represent facial features, and usually oriented sideways. The emoticon is designed to indicate emotion or attitude. The classic example is the smiley face 🙂

98. Encourages EGGS ON
The verb “edge” has been used to mean to incite, to urge on, from the 16th century. Somewhere along the way “edge” was mistakenly replaced with “egg”, giving us our term “to egg on” meaning “to goad”.

99. Minimum-range tide NEAP
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

104. Major mix-up SNAFU
SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that’s the “polite” version!). As you might imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

105. Down Under gem OPAL
97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, about 80%.

108. Buffalo’s lake ERIE
Buffalo is the second most-populous city in the state of New York. The city takes its name from Buffalo Creek that runs through the metropolis (although the waterway is called Buffalo River within the city). The source of the name Buffalo Creek is the subject of much speculation, but one thing is clear, there were never any bison in the area.

110. Angled print: Abbr. ITAL
Italic type leans to the right. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

111. Xing people? PEDS
Pedestrian Crossing (Ped Xing)

113. Wall St. highlights IPOS
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

115. ’60s TV barn resident MR ED
The sitcom “Mister Ed” first aired in 1961 and ran for almost five years. It was a very successful show (and even made it to Ireland!). Mister Ed, the talking horse, was a palomino that had the real name of Bamboo Harvester. Mister Ed’s “voice” was that of actor Allan “Rocky” Lane, a star of a lot of B-movie westerns from the forties and fifties. In the show, Mister Ed would only talk to the lead (human) character Wilbur, played by Alan Young, leading to some hilarious situations. Mister Ed had a stunt double and stand-in for the show, another horse called Pumpkin. Pumpkin later made frequent appearances on the show “Green Acres”.

118. “__ You Experienced”: Hendrix album ARE
Many of his contemporaries regarded Jimi Hendrix as the greatest electric guitarist in the history of rock music. Hendrix was from Seattle and didn’t really have a really stellar start to his working life. He failed to finish high school and fell foul of the law by getting caught in stolen cars, twice. The courts gave him the option of the army or two years in prison. Hendrix chose the former and soon found himself in the famous 101st Airborne. In the army, his less-than-disciplined ways helped him (as he would have seen it) because his superiors successfully petitioned to get him discharged after serving only one year of his two-year requirement, just to get him out of their hair.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Duchamp genre DADA
5. Toot one’s own horn GLOAT
10. In the thick of AMONG
15. Prepare for a birth, in a way NEST
19. Not supportin’ AGIN
20. Moose meeting place LODGE
21. Check DETER
22. Munch Museum city OSLO
23. *Bugs line WHAT’S UP, DOC?
25. Seat of New York’s Oneida County UTICA
26. Common parade street MAIN
27. Martha’s Vineyard papers GAZETTES
28. *Classic novel with the chapter “My Breaking In” BLACK BEAUTY
30. Babs Bunny, e.g. DOE
31. Website for techies CNET
33. Single or double BED
34. Title teacher in a 1967 film SIR
37. *”End of discussion!” AND THAT’S FINAL!
43. Guinea pig, e.g. PET
46. Part of a Latin trio AMAS
48. It may be close SHAVE
49. Meter reading USAGE
50. Eggs in a clinic OVA
51. *John Adams’ home after the Market Street mansion WHITE HOUSE
54. Air quality concern SMOG
55. Sounds heard with a stethoscope RALES
57. Hyundai sedan SONATA
58. Glue base GELATIN
60. Agcy. with facilities in Denver and West Point US MINT
61. Ben Jonson epitaph words O RARE
63. Like pre-Easter diets LENTEN
65. Comédie part ACTE
66. To be, in Paris ETRE
68. *”That’s how the cookie crumbles” AND SO IT GOES
72. Hardy heroine TESS
73. Capone nemesis NESS
74. Everett of “Citizen Kane” SLOANE
75. Cryptic letters RUNES
77. Drying-out sites REHABS
79. Quake danger TSUNAMI
83. Delivery van assignments ROUTES
86. Baker with Grammys ANITA
87. BC and Cal, e.g. SCHS
88. *Whodunit staple RED HERRING
90. Base VIP GEN
91. Popular Girl Scout cookie SAMOA
93. Indian wrap: Var. SAREE
94. Grumpy mood SNIT
95. Prior to, poetically ERE
96. *Soap set in Pine Valley, Pennsylvania ALL MY CHILDREN
100. Mdse. GDS
101. Gentle treatment, briefly TLC
102. Weighty refs. OEDS
103. Some dishwashers GES
105. *No spring chicken OVER THE HILL
111. Polytheistic creed PAGANISM
116. Rate of speed PACE
117. Pope’s muse ERATO
118. Answer to the spoken riddle hidden in the answers to starred clues A NEWSPAPER
120. Like many a quote: Abbr. ANON
121. Home to the Sforza Castle MILAN
122. “Buckaroo Holiday” ballet RODEO
123. Driver’s warning FORE!
124. Advance LEND
125. Argues vehemently YELLS
126. German steel hub ESSEN
127. Secondhand USED

Down
1. University of Georgia athlete, familiarly DAWG
2. Ottoman general AGHA
3. Actress Cameron DIAZ
4. Paid for a hand ANTED
5. Wheat protein GLUTEN
6. Easy gait LOPE
7. Bookie’s numbers ODDS
8. Back in the day AGO
9. Sleuth, slangily TEC
10. Former minors ADULTS
11. Prefix with ethics META-
12. Of the ear OTIC
13. Banjo part with frets NECK
14. Bit of this, bit of that GRAB BAG
15. Rootless one NOMAD
16. Jacob’s womb-mate ESAU
17. Cut (open), as a letter SLIT
18. Tiger with a red scarf TONY
24. Ancient gathering place STOA
28. __ noir BETE
29. Sushi bar suppliers EELERS
31. Scene using stunt drivers CHASE
32. Piercing site NAVEL
34. Cutting tools SAWS
35. Letters before two cents? IMHO
36. Whatever the weather RAIN OR SHINE
38. Brit. medal DSO
39. Tough guy THUG
40. Going through the roof FUMING
41. Sees through IS ONTO
42. Critic who won’t quit NAG
43. Tricky force tactic POLICE STING
44. Some are blessed EVENTS
45. Sweet and sour TASTES
47. Eyes persistently STARES AT
52. Pilot’s update, briefly ETA
53. Heckle, say HARASS
54. Editor’s “Leave it” STET
56. Many open mic night performers AMATEURS
59. Sci-fi staple ALIEN
60. On the fence UNSURE
62. Blowup: Abbr. ENL
64. “I do not see why I should __ turn back”: Frost E’ER
66. Infuriate ENRAGE
67. Many a concertgoer TEENER
69. Many a startup DOT-COM
70. Move nonchalantly SASHAY
71. Burden ONUS
76. “Neither snow __ rain … ” NOR
78. Lava rock BASALT
80. “It’s __!”: speakeasy warning A RAID
81. Keyboardist Saunders and crossword immortal Reagle MERLS
82. Pegged IDED
84. Oklahoma’s “Wheat Capital” ENID
85. LAPD ranks SGTS
87. Tee sizes, initially SML
89. Nautical pronoun HER
92. Speculative lead-to-gold practice ALCHEMY
93. Author Silverstein SHEL
97. Eyes in texts COLONS
98. Encourages EGGS ON
99. Minimum-range tide NEAP
101. Graph revelation TREND
104. Major mix-up SNAFU
105. Down Under gem OPAL
106. Rooftop sight VANE
107. Micro- or macro- subj. ECON
108. Buffalo’s lake ERIE
109. Area where a pass may be needed HALL
110. Angled print: Abbr. ITAL
111. Xing people? PEDS
112. __ bit: slightly A WEE
113. Wall St. highlights IPOS
114. Arid SERE
115. ’60s TV barn resident MR ED
118. “__ You Experienced”: Hendrix album ARE
119. Negatives NOS

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7 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Dec 15, Sunday”

  1. Very strange grid to me. Call it a crossword Christmas gift if you will. 1 error (62-Down), completely unaided. And relatively quickly too, to the point it has given me a little more time to try and figure out the nasty (by comparison) Friday and Saturday grids before I call DNF on them both.

  2. A very easy puzzle. I thought I was done in 20:10 (about as fast as I could fill in the answers using pen and paper), but then I remembered that I had left one square blank; it took me another 3:32 to fill in the "G" of DAWG and then correct DIAN/GANETTES to DIAZ/GAZETTES. My final time was therefore 23:42, with no errors.

  3. Darn! I got one letter wrong!
    ERITO/HILL.
    Oh well, I liked this puzzle. Not your run-of-the-mill PUNDAY fare.
    OK back to reality on Monday, if you remember what day today is.
    Anyone else keep getting the days mixed up when we have a holiday?
    The wind finally left. Left a mess of stuff to sweep up.
    Have a good day, everyone.

  4. I got the theme early on, and typed in READ w/o knowing the rest of that phrase. That slowed me down quite a bit, and irritated me very much. Newspapers aren't RED, they are READ!!!!! That spelling is what makes the joke. Boo. Hiss.
    Matt

  5. I realize no one will probably see this comment but since I finished the puzzle this morning so be it! I took some extra time with 70 Down since I first stuck in "stroll" and had to go back and figure out "sashay", which took a while. Otherwise this was a very straightforward and pretty easy Sunday "big" grid.

  6. Finished puzzle (more like two hours)and went to internet to figure out "Ben Jonson,IMHO, and runes".Found your site…GREAT! Will use you in future for sure. I hated this puzzle as even after I finished it I could not solve the riddle. I guess I need to shake up my head a little more to get into that "other world"..hahaha. Thanks

  7. hi Bill , happy new year
    found the theme a bit of a stretch but keep up the good work
    and all the best for 2016
    see you on sunday(in the paper) for the next puzzle
    rick in montreal

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