LA Times Crossword 4 Nov 22, Friday

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Constructed by: Nathan Hale
Edited by: Patti Varol

Today’s Reveal Answer: Stock Exchange

Themed answers are common phrases including an animal, but that animal has been EXCHANGED for another:

  • 56A Wall Street site, and what happened in order to form the answers to the starred clues? : STOCK EXCHANGE
  • 20A *Era known for Pegasus and other winged stallions? : WHEN HORSES FLY (from “when pigs fly”)
  • 33A *Tenderize steaks? : BEAT A DEAD COW (from “beat a dead horse”)
  • 41A *Pet restriction set by the condo board? : DON’T HAVE A PIG (from “don’t have a cow”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 7m 55s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Pros unlikely to use vacation time in April : CPAS

Certified public accountant (CPA)

April 15th wasn’t always Tax Day in the US. The deadline for returns was March 1st from 1913-18, when it was moved to March 15th. Tax Day has been April 15th since 1955.

14 Cantina breakfast element : HUEVO

In Spanish, one needs at least one “huevo” (egg) to make an omelet.

18 Machu Picchu’s land : PERU

Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cusco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

20 *Era known for Pegasus and other winged stallions? : WHEN HORSES FLY (from “when pigs fly”)

Pegasus is a white, winged stallion of Greek mythology. Pegasus was sired by Poseidon and foaled by Medusa.

24 Ambient musician Brian : ENO

Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the genre of ambient music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, which was the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks, somewhat inventively, 1/1, 1/2, 2/1 and 2/2.

30 __ Valley: Reagan Library site : SIMI

Simi Valley, California is perhaps best known as home to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. The library is a great place to visit, and there you can tour one of the retired Air Force One planes.

36 Either of the “Grey Gardens” women : EDIE

“Grey Gardens” is a 1975 documentary about a reclusive mother and daughter, “Big Edie” and “Little Edie” Beale, living in a derelict mansion in a wealthy neighborhood of East Hampton, New York. Big Edie’s full name was Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale, and she was an aunt of former US First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (née Bouvier). The two Edies lived for decades at the Grey Gardens estate, in increasing poverty. At one point, Jacqueline Kennedy, along with her sister, had to fund repairs of the mansion in order to avoid the house being torn down by the local authority.

39 Actor Barinholtz : IKE

Ike Barinholtz is an actor and comedian who appeared on MADtv from 2002 until 2007. More recently, Barinholtz became a writer on the TV show “The Mindy Project”, and was then cast as Nurse Morgan Tookers.

41 *Pet restriction set by the condo board? : DON’T HAVE A PIG (from “don’t have a cow”)

The phrase “don’t have a cow” originated in the fifties, as a variation of the older “don’t have kittens”. The concept behind the phrase is that one shouldn’t get worked up, it’s not like one is giving birth to a cow.

The terms “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the same type of residential property, namely a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com-” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

46 State Dept. URL ender : GOV

The .gov domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

The US Department of State is the equivalent of the Foreign Ministry in many other countries, and is responsible for international relations. Ceremonially, the Secretary of State is the highest ranking of all Cabinet officials, and is the highest ranking in the presidential line of succession (fourth, after the Vice President, the Speaker of the House and the President pro tem of the Senate). The department was created in 1789 by President Washington, and was the first of all executive departments created. The first Secretary of State was future-president Thomas Jefferson.

47 Famous __ cookies : AMOS

Wally Amos was a talent agent, one who was in the habit of taking home-baked cookies with him as an enticement to get celebrities to see him. He was urged by friends to open a cookie store (the cookies were that delicious, I guess) and this he did in Los Angeles in 1975 using the name “Famous Amos”. The store was a smash hit and he was able to build on the success by introducing his cookies into supermarkets. The brand was eventually purchased, making Wally a rich man, and Famous Amos cookies are still flying off the shelf. Wally Amos also became an energetic literacy advocate. He hosted 30 TV programs in 1987 entitled “Learn to Read” that provided reading instruction targeted at adults.

48 Lackluster : ANEMIC

The term “anemia” (or “anaemia”, as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning “lack of blood”. Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition, and so we use the term “anemic” figuratively to mean “lacking in vitality or substance”.

Something described as lackluster is dull, it “lacks luster”. The term “lack-luster” was probably coined by the Bard himself. William Shakespeare used is in his play “As You Like It”, which was probably written in 1599:

And then he drew a dial from his poke
And, looking on it with lackluster eye,
Says very wisely, “It is ten o’clock.

56 Wall Street site, and what happened in order to form the answers to the starred clues? : STOCK EXCHANGE

New York’s famous Wall Street was originally named by the Dutch “de Waalstraat”. The “Waal” in question was a wall erected by Dutch colonists to protect them from an attack by the British from the north. The attack by land never came, but the British did mount a successful invasion by sea. The British demolished the wall two decades later, in 1699.

60 Rental car choice : AVIS

Avis has been around since 1946, and is the second largest car rental agency after Hertz. Avis has the distinction of being the first car rental company to locate a branch at an airport.

62 “Rubyfruit Jungle” writer __ Mae Brown : RITA

Rita Mae Brown is an American author who is best known for her 1973 novel “Rubyfruit Jungle”. Brown was the domestic partner of tennis champion Martina Navratilova in the late seventies and early eighties.

64 “Whip It” rock band : DEVO

Devo is a band from Akron, Ohio formed back in 1973. The band’s biggest hit is “Whip It” released in 1980. Devo have a gimmick: the wearing of red, terraced plastic hats that are referred to as “energy domes”. Why? I have no idea …

67 Yoked team : OXEN

A yoke is a wooden beam used between a pair of animals so that they are forced to work together.

68 Strong urges : YENS

The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium.

Down

1 __ down: ate with relish : CHOWED

“Chow” is a slang term for “food” that originated in California in the mid-1800s. “Chow” comes from the Chinese pidgin English “chow-chow” meaning “food”.

2 Game that introduced the joker into modern playing cards : EUCHRE

Playing cards, in various forms, have been around for centuries and were probably invented in China. The Joker card is an American invention, appearing first in the late 1860s. The Joker was introduced as a card for the game of Euchre, and the suggestion is that the term “Joker” comes from “Juker” or “Juckerspiel”, the original German name for Euchre.

6 Brand of helmet cams : GOPRO

GoPro is a company that makes high-definition video cameras that have a rugged design. Famously, GoPro cameras are used in extreme conditions. For example, they are often mounted on moving vehicles or used by people playing sports. Two astronauts on the International Space Station inserted a GoPro camera inside a floating ball of water, and then showed the view from inside the ball of water. Amazing footage …

7 __ of March : IDES

Julius Caesar was assassinated on the 15th (the ides) of March, 44 BC. He was attacked by a group of sixty people in the Roman Senate, and was stabbed 23 times. The first to strike a blow was Servilius Casca, who attacked Caesar from behind and stabbed him in the neck. In Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”, Casca utters the words “Speak, hands, for me!” just before making the fatal blow. The following line, uttered by Caesar, is more famous though: “Et tu, Brute?”

8 Warning from a driver? : FORE!

No one seems to know for sure where the golfing term “fore!” comes from. It has been used at least as far back as 1881, and since then has been called out to warn other golfers that a wayward ball might be heading their way. My favorite possibility for its origin is that it is a contraction of the Gaelic warning cry “Faugh a Ballagh!” (clear the way!) which is still called out in the sport of road bowling. Road bowling is an Irish game where players bowl balls along roads between villages, trying to reach the end of the course in as few bowls as possible, just like in golf!

10 Soccer great Lloyd who wrote the memoir “When Nobody Was Watching” : CARLI

Carli Lloyd is a retired professional soccer player who played on the US teams that won the FIFA World Cup in 2015 and 2019. In the 2015 tournament, she scored a hat-trick in the final. I well remember the only other hat trick in a World Cup final, a feat accomplished by Geoff Hurst for England in 1966.

22 Cold, in Córdoba : FRIA

Córdoba is a city in Andalusia in southern Spain that is sometimes referred to as “Cordova” in English. Córdoba might be the right destination for anyone seeking out a warm vacation spot in Spain. The city has the highest average summer temperatures in the whole of Europe.

26 Spiky succulent : ALOE

Succulent plants are those with thickened stems and/or leaves that have evolved to retain water. As such, succulents are often found where the climate is particularly dry. The term “succulent” comes from the Latin “sucus” meaning “juice, sap”.

34 Early DVR brand : TIVO

TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful digital video recorder (DVR).

35 Old Venetian magistrate : DOGE

Doges were the elected chief magistrates of the former republics of Venice and Genoa.

38 Like kudzu : INVASIVE

Kudzu is a climbing vine that is native to southern Japan and southeast China. “Kudzu” is derived from the Japanese name for the plant, “kuzu”. Kudzu is a vigorously growing weed that chokes other plants by climbing all over them and shielding them from light. Kudzu was brought to the US from Asia for the Japanese pavilion in the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. It was marketed as an ornamental, especially in the southeast of the country, and now is all over the region. Kudzu earned itself the nickname “the vine that ate the South”.

43 “Take a hike!” : AMSCRAY!

Pig Latin is in effect a game. One takes the first consonant or consonant cluster of an English word and moves it to the end of the word, and then adds the letters “ay”. So, the Pig Latin for the word “nix” is “ixnay” (ix-n-ay), and for “scram” is “amscray” (am-scr-ay).

44 Pique-nique setting : PARC

In France, one might have a “pique-nique” (picnic) in the “parc” (park).

Our term “picnic” comes from the French word that now has the same meaning, namely “pique-nique”. The original “pique-nique” was a fashionable potluck affair, and not necessarily held outdoors.

45 Piqued : IN A HUFF

Our term “pique” meaning “fit of ill feeling” is a French word meaning “prick, sting, irritation”.

49 “Wolf Hall” novelist Hilary : MANTEL

“Wolf Hall” is a 2009 historical novel by Hilary Mantel that provides a fictional account of the life of Thomas Cromwell, chief minister to King Henry VIII. The novel was adapted by the BBC into a very successful TV series of the same name. “Wolf Hall” is the first part of a trilogy of books by Mantel, followed by “Bring Up the Bodies” (2012) and “The Mirror and the Light” (2020).

58 Historic British school : ETON

Eton College near Windsor in the south of England was founded way back in 1440 by King Henry VI. Originally known as “The King’s College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor”, the school was intended to provide free education to poor boys. Free education today at Eton? Not so much …

59 “__ Want for Christmas Is You” : ALL I

“All I Want for Christmas Is You” is a 1994 song recorded by Mariah Carey that has become a holiday standard. The song was co-written by Carey with Walter Afanasieff, in just 15 minutes …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Gives away : CEDES
6 __ receipt : GIFT
10 Pros unlikely to use vacation time in April : CPAS
14 Cantina breakfast element : HUEVO
15 Smell : ODOR
16 Plus : ALSO
17 Four pairs : OCTET
18 Machu Picchu’s land : PERU
19 Frog sound? : RASP
20 *Era known for Pegasus and other winged stallions? : WHEN HORSES FLY (from “when pigs fly”)
23 Goof : ERR
24 Ambient musician Brian : ENO
25 Like many hunter-gatherer societies : TRIBAL
28 Want : DESIRE
30 __ Valley: Reagan Library site : SIMI
32 Pub fare : ALE
33 *Tenderize steaks? : BEAT A DEAD COW (from “beat a dead horse”)
36 Either of the “Grey Gardens” women : EDIE
39 Actor Barinholtz : IKE
40 Greenlit : OK’ED
41 *Pet restriction set by the condo board? : DON’T HAVE A PIG (from “don’t have a cow”)
46 State Dept. URL ender : GOV
47 Famous __ cookies : AMOS
48 Lackluster : ANEMIC
52 Contacts online : EMAILS
54 Notable period : ERA
55 Pleased sigh : AAH!
56 Wall Street site, and what happened in order to form the answers to the starred clues? : STOCK EXCHANGE
60 Rental car choice : AVIS
62 “Rubyfruit Jungle” writer __ Mae Brown : RITA
63 Radical : ULTRA
64 “Whip It” rock band : DEVO
65 Elemental unit : ATOM
66 Sea-bound group : FLEET
67 Yoked team : OXEN
68 Strong urges : YENS
69 Directory items : FILES

Down

1 __ down: ate with relish : CHOWED
2 Game that introduced the joker into modern playing cards : EUCHRE
3 Dissuades : DETERS
4 Square : EVEN
5 “Take that!” : SO THERE!
6 Brand of helmet cams : GOPRO
7 __ of March : IDES
8 Warning from a driver? : FORE!
9 “Would I lie to you?” : TRUST ME
10 Soccer great Lloyd who wrote the memoir “When Nobody Was Watching” : CARLI
11 Listen to, as a recording : PLAY BACK
12 Donkey : ASS
13 Soak (up) : SOP
21 Window seat at the front of an airplane, often : ONE-A
22 Cold, in Córdoba : FRIA
26 Spiky succulent : ALOE
27 More than off-color : LEWD
29 “Suuuuure” : I BET
30 “Land __ alive!” : SAKES
31 Notion : IDEA
34 Early DVR brand : TIVO
35 Old Venetian magistrate : DOGE
36 Leg up : EDGE
37 Unhappy ending : DOOM
38 Like kudzu : INVASIVE
42 Saintly glow : HALO
43 “Take a hike!” : AMSCRAY!
44 Pique-nique setting : PARC
45 Piqued : IN A HUFF
49 “Wolf Hall” novelist Hilary : MANTEL
50 “No argument here” : I AGREE
51 Flouts the rules : CHEATS
53 “Here we go!” : IT’S ON!
54 Physicals : EXAMS
57 Sky box? : KITE
58 Historic British school : ETON
59 “__ Want for Christmas Is You” : ALL I
60 Hubbub : ADO
61 Aggravate : VEX

15 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 4 Nov 22, Friday”

  1. I loved this puzzle. Extremely clever. Clues and answers were perfectly in sync.

    I’m hoping for more of same caliber.

    Fantastic

  2. I loved this puzzle. Extremely clever. Clues and answers were perfectly in sync.

    I’m hoping for more of same caliber.

    Fantastic

  3. I was all ready to roll on the floor laughing my ass off if 33 Across had ended up being “Beat ones meat” but, alas, no floor rolling for me this morning. Probably a good thing since I would have probably ended up pulling something (ha!). I know, I’m still 14 at heart. But maybe that’s not such a bad thing?

    No real difficulty but took sometime coming up with “Don’t have a pig” when all I could think was “dog” and not “pig”.

  4. Terrific theme. Very clever and cool. Nailed it except for GOPRO/GIFT. Had lopro which made for lift. Oh well, pretty good for a Friday.

  5. 8:24

    Nice three way exchange in the themes.

    I was this close to looking up Hilary MANTEL, despite her recent death being in the news, but the name came to me after all.

  6. No look ups, no errors. One change on the fly, wolfed/chowed. Silly theme…..
    When’s the last time you heard or used amscray? Are we kids or what….

  7. 9 mins, 23 sec, and no errors. A few too many names for my liking, and the punny theme was pretty “forced”.

  8. 17:07 – no errors, one confirmation look up for Hilary Mantel. False starts: OCTAD>OCTET, DONTHAVEADOG>DONTHAVEAPIG, IRK>VEX.

    New: EDIE (seems lime a sad story of a mother and daughter), IKE Barinholtz, “Rubyfruit Jungle,” RITA Mae Brown, CARLI Lloyd, Hilary MANTEL.

    Clever theme construction, but didn’t “get it” right away.

  9. Mostly easy Friday for me; took 13:20 with no peeks or errors. When it looked like …PIG was desired, I took another look at the theme reveal and figured it out pretty quick. Didn’t know a few things: EDIE, IKE, MANTEL and only kinda knew EUCHRE and RITA.

    Still, pretty fun to finish a Friday in pretty good time…

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