LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Aug 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Clive Probert
THEME: R&D … each of today’s themed answers is a well-known phrase that includes word starting with a letter R, but that R now gets a D in front of it:

23A. Saloon with a strict no-quipping policy? ANTI-DROLL BAR (from “antiroll bar”)
35A. Art class focused on river rapids? WHITEWATER DRAFTING (from “whitewater rafting”)
52A. Has the downspouts inspected? GETS A DRAIN CHECK (from “gets a rain check”)
76A. Portrait of Donald’s life? A DRAKE’S PROGRESS (from “A Rake’s Progress”)
89A. Worries about contract details? DREADS THE FINE PRINT (from “reads the fine print”)
108A. Refreshment after some winter recreation? SKATING DRINK (from “skating rink”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Route with many turns SLALOM
Slalom is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word “slalam” that translates as “skiing race”. There is a longer version of the traditional slalom that is called giant slalom.

7. Command to a guard dog SIC ‘EM
“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

12. Cap with a feather, to Yankee Doodle MACARONI

Yankee Doodle came to town
Riding on a pony;
He stuck a feather in his hat,
And called it macaroni

20. Way out? PAROLE
The term “parole” is a French word that we use in English, with the French “parole” meaning “word, speech”. Of particular interest is the French phrase “parole d’honneur” which translates as “word of honor”. In the early 1600s we started using “parole” to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his “word of honor” not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

21. Budget rival ALAMO
The third largest car rental company right now is Alamo, a relative newcomer founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun intended!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

The Budget Rent a Car company started out in 1958 with the intent of undercutting the existing price of renting a car at airports. Budget was founded by Morris Mirkin. Mirkin enlisted Julius Lederer as a co-founder the following year. Lederer was the husband of newspaper columnist “Ann Landers”.

22. Cosmetic oil source AVOCADOS
The wonderful avocado comes from a tree that is native to Mexico and Central America. The avocado fruit is sometime called an avocado pear, because of its shape, even though it is not related to the pear at all. The fruit might also be referred to as an alligator pear, due to the roughness of the green skin of some avocado cultivars.

25. Hallucinatory state DELIRIUM
“Delirium” is the Latin word for “madness”.

27. Basic chem. unit MOL
Molecule (mol.)

30. Port on the Danish island Fyn ODENSE
Odense is a city in Denmark, named after the Norse god Odin. One of the most famous sons of Odense was Hans Christian Andersen, the author of children’s stories.

31. “The Matrix” hero NEO
Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989), a cop in “Speed” (1994) and the main antagonist Neo in “The Matrix” series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name “Keanu” is Hawaiian for “the coldness”.

The 1999 movie sensation “The Matrix” was meant to be set in a nondescript urban environment. It was actually shot in Australia, as one of the co-producers of the film was the Australian company, Village Roadshow Pictures. You can pick up all sorts of clues about the location when watching the film, including a view of Sydney Harbour Bridge in a background shot. Also, traffic drives along on the left and there are signs for the “lift” instead of an “elevator”.

32. Wraparound garment SARI
The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

33. Simba’s mate NALA
In “The Lion King”, Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba.

Simba is the main character in the Disney animated feature, “The Lion King”. “Simba” is the Swahili word for “lion”.

34. NFL commentator Collinsworth CRIS
Cris Collinsworth is a sportscaster for several broadcasting organizations. Collinsworth played as a wide receiver in the NFL for eight seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals.

44. Suffix with polymer -ASE
Polymerase is an enzyme, with the job of making new RNA and DNA.

46. “Go jump in the loch!” NAE!
“Loch” is the Scottish Gaelic word for “lake”. The Irish Gaelic word is “lough”.

48. Data-transfer meas. BPS
Bits per second (bps).

In the world of computers, a “bit” is the basic unit of information. It has a value of 0 or 1. A “byte” is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text. The prefix mega- stands for 10 to the power of 6, so a megabyte (meg) is 1,000,000 bytes. And the prefix giga- means 10 to the power of 9, so a gigabyte (gig) is 1,000,000,000 bytes. Well, those are the SI definitions of megabyte and kilobyte. The purists still use 2 to the power of 20 for a megabyte (i.e. 1,048,576), and 2 to the power of 30 for a gigabyte.

50. San Jose-based tech giant CISCO
Cisco is a company that I really admire (in terms of innovation and management). Headquartered in San Jose, California, Cisco develops and sells products and services in the communications sector. The name “Cisco” was taken from the name of the city San Francisco.

51. Wag CARD
A “wag” or a “card” is a very amusing person, often quite eccentric.

56. “Big” star HANKS
Tom Hanks is a such a great actor, I think. He has played so many iconic roles in a relatively short career. Hanks is from California, and studied theater for a couple of years in Hayward, California not far from here. Hanks is married to the talented actress Rita Wilson.

“Big” is a fun movie, released in 1988. It is a romantic comedy with an unusual plot involving a young boy who is aged to adulthood overnight (played by Tom Hanks). Who can forget the scene where Hanks and the owner of a toy store hop around on a giant piano keyboard. Remember what they played? “Heart and Soul” and “Chopsticks” …

57. Sieben-neun link ACHT
In German, seven, eight, nine (sieben, acht, neun).

58. Porridge bit OAT
Porridge is a meal made from a cereal, usually oatmeal. Back in the 1500s, “porage” was a soup made from meat and vegetables, and about a decade later in Scotland the term became associated with oatmeal. The term is an alteration of “pottage”, an earlier word for “soup”.

60. Board game based on pachisi SORRY!
The board game called Trouble was introduced in the US in 1965, and is very similar to the competing game called “Sorry!” that was already on the market. Both games are in turn based on the ancient game of Pachisi. The big selling feature of Trouble was the Pop-O-Matic dice container in the center of the board. I remember it well …

62. Subway fixtures STILES
The turnstiles seen at the entrances to places like subway stations and sporting arenas are named for the stiles in fences in rural areas. A stile is a structure allowing people to pass over or through a fence, while at the same time preventing livestock from escaping.

65. Primate in “Tarzan” films CHEETA
The chimpanzee Cheeta was a very popular character in the most of the Tarzan movies and television shows, however, he/she (the sex changed back and forth) never appeared in the original novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs.

68. Muscular power SINEW
Sinew is another name for a tendon. Tendons are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle. We also use the term “sinew” to mean muscular power.

70. Grieg’s “__ Death” ASE’S
“Ase’s Death” is a movement in Edvard Grieg’s beautiful “Peer Gynt” suite. The suite is a collection of incidental music that Grieg composed for Ibsen’s play of the same name. Ase is the widow of a peasant, and the mother of Peer Gynt.

Edvard Grieg is Norway’s best known composer, active in the Romantic Era. Grieg’s most famous works are the gorgeous “Piano Concerto in A minor:”, and his incidental music for the play “Peer Gynt” by Henrik Ibsen.

71. Delt neighbor LAT
The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is the Latin for “broadest” and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

The deltoid muscle is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

73. Perón and others EVAS
Eva Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón who was in office from 1946 to 1955. The Argentine First Lady was known affectionately by the people as “Evita”, the Spanish language diminutive of “Eva”. “Evita” was also the follow-up musical to “Jesus Christ Superstar” for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, and was based on the life of Eva Perón.

74. Jam cacophony HORNS
The use of “jam”, to mean an improvised passage performed by a whole jazz band, dates back to the late twenties. This gave rise to “jam session”, a term used a few years later. The use of “jam” in this context probably stems from the meaning of “jam” as something sweet, something excellent.

“Cacophony” is such a lovely word, one used to describe a harsh or jarring sound. The term arises from the Greek “kakos” (bad) and “phone” (voice).

76. Portrait of Donald’s life? A DRAKE’S PROGRESS (from “A Rake’s Progress”)
“A Rake’s Progress” is a series of paintings by English artist William Hogarth that were produced in the 1730s. The paintings show scenes in the life of Tom Rakewell, a wealthy man who goes to rack and ruin, eventually ending up in a mental asylum. The Hogarth paintings inspired an opera by Igor Stravinsky, a ballet by Gavin Gordon, and a film starring Rex Harrison, all called “The Rake’s Progress”.

80. “So I’m cuter,” to Tom Cruise: Abbr. ANAG
Here are some fun anagrams (well, I think so!).

– Ralph Waldo Emerson = person whom all read
– Elvis = lives
– David Letterman = nerd amid late TV
– Clint Eastwood = old west action
– George Bush = he bugs Gore
– Emperor Octavian = captain over Rome
– Alec Guinness = genuine class
– William Shakespeare = I am a weakish speller
– Noel Coward is = no Oscar Wilde
– Nurse Florence Nightingale = heroine curing fallen gents
– Margaret Thatcher = that great charmer

81. Brooklyn institute PRATT
The Pratt Institute is an art college in Brooklyn, New York. The school started out as an engineering college in 1887, founded by oil industry pioneer Charles Pratt. However, the engineering program was dropped in 1993 due to small enrolment numbers.

82. Cephalopod’s defense INK
Octopuses and squid have the ability to release a dark pigment into the water as a means of escape. The dark pigment is called cephalopod ink (the squid and octopus belong to the class cephalopod). The dark color is created by melanin, the same substance that acts as a pigment in human skin.

83. Range in NE Utah UINTA
The Uinta Mountains are a subrange of the Rocky Mountains located mainly in northeastern Utah, approximately 100 miles east of Salt Lake City. The highest point in the Uintas is Kings Peak, the highest point in Utah.

94. Light bite NOSH
Our word “nosh” has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word “nashn” meaning “to nibble”. We use “nosh” as a noun that means snack, or as a verb meaning to eat between meals.

96. 100 cents EURO
The euro sign (&#8364) looks like a letter C, but with two horizontal lines drawn across the middle. Inspiration for the design comes from the Greek letter epsilon.

97. Ryder Cup org. PGA
The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

The Ryder Cup trophy was donated to the game of golf by Samuel Ryder, an English entrepreneur. Ryder made his money selling garden seeds in small packets. He only took up golf when he was in his fifties but became quite the enthusiast and eventually donated the trophy in 1927, when it was valued at 100 guineas.

104. Fjord kin RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

111. Customs-exempt storage facility FREE ZONE
Free trade zones are geographical areas that where goods and materials may be imported, and products may be manufactured and exported, without the intervention of the customs authorities. Duties become payable if the goods leave the free trade zone and enter into the country where the zone is located. Such zones are established by governments in order to stimulate the local economy and reduce unemployment.

112. Anthrax-prevention drug CIPRO
Ciprofloxacin (aka “cipro”) is an antibiotic used to treat a whole host of bacterial infections including anthrax.

Anthrax is a potentially lethal disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium can form dormant spores that can be stored, and potentially weaponized. When the spores are inhaled or ingested, or even touched, they can activate and infect the victim.

113. Concert cry ENCORE
“Encore” is French for “again, one more time”, and is a shout that an audience member will make here in North America to request another song, say. But, the term is not used this way in France. Rather, the audience will shout “Bis!” instead, which is the Italian for “twice!”

115. Start of the Common Era ONE AD
The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

Down
1. Mediterranean land SPAIN
Spain is the second largest country in the European Union (after France). “Spain” is an anglicized form of the Spanish name “España”, which comes from the Roman name for the country “Hispania”.

The Mediterranean Sea is almost completely enclosed by land, and is connected to the Atlantic Ocean by the narrow Strait of Gibraltar. The sea takes its name from the Latin “mediterraneus”, which means “in the middle of land”.

2. Medieval Times prop LANCE
Medieval Times is a dinner theater in which a large cast of actors and horse entertain guest with staged medieval-style games. Medieval Times is a chain of theaters with locations in several parts of North America. The exterior of each theater is designed to look like a 11th-century castle.

3. Lovable droid ARTOO
Artoo’s proper name is R2-D2. R2-D2 is the smaller of the two famous droids from the “Star Wars” movies. British actor Kenny Baker, who stands just 3 ft 8 ins tall, has been the man inside the R2-D2 droid for all six of the “Star Wars” movies.

4. Butcher’s cut LOIN
The cut known as “loin” is the tissue along the top of the ribs.

6. Madison in “Splash,” as it turns out MERMAID
In the 1984 movie “Splash”, Madison the mermaid is played by Daryl Hannah, opposite Tom Hanks. Before the movie was released, Madison was not very popular as a name for girls, but then it just took off, apparently spurred by the use in the film.

7. __ Mae SALLIE
“Sallie Mae” is a nickname for SLM Corporation, created in 1972 by the US government as the Student Loan Marketing Association. By 2004 the government had severed all its ties with Sallie Mae, and today SLM is basically a profit-focused lender.

9. Changing places CABANAS
Our word “cabana” comes from the Spanish “cabaña”, the word for a small hut or a cabin.

14. State bordering seven others COLORADO
The state of Colorado is named for the famed river. In turn, the river was named “Río Colorado” by Spanish explorers. “Colorado” is a Spanish word meaning “ruddy”, and was a reference to the color of the water as it picked up silt from the mountains.

17. God with an eight-legged horse ODIN
Sleipnir is an eight-legged horse of Norse mythology, the steed that was ridden by Odin.

18. Toi et moi NOUS
In French, you and me (toi et moi) are collectively known as us (nous).

24. __ cloud: comet-filled region in interstellar space OORT
The Oort Cloud is a hypothetical spherical cloud of comets that lies about a light-year from the sun. It is postulated that periodic comets that enter our solar system (like Halley’s Comet) originate in the Oort Cloud.

32. He-Man’s twin SHE-RA
“She-Ra: Princess of Power” is an animated television show, a spinoff of the very successful “He-Man and the Masters of the Universe”. Both shows are aimed at young people, with “He-Man” targeted at boys and “She-Ra” at girls.

39. British stoolie NARK
Back in the 1800s, “to nark” was “to act as a police informer”. The spelling of the term has started to evolve into “to narc”, due to the influence of the noun “narc”, slang for a narcotics officer. The ”nark” spelling is still used on the other side of the Atlantic.

Stoolies, also called canaries, will sing to the cops given the right incentive. “Stoolie” is short for “stool pigeon”. A stool pigeon was a decoy bird tied to a stool so as to lure other pigeons. “Stoolies” were originally decoys for the police, rather than informers, hence the name.

40. Night sch. goals GEDS
The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of five tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

41. Sitar tunes RAGAS
Raga isn’t really a type of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners).

The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. The sitar is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the instrument largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a onetime student of Shankar.

48. Olga product BRA
Olga is a manufacturer of lingerie that was started by Olga Erteszek who immigrated to California from Europe during WWII. Erteszek’s initial stake in her business was just ten dollars, which she used to rent a sewing machine.

49. Square spread on a slice PAT
A “pat” of butter is so called because of the tradition of forming it by “patting”.

56. Princely letters HRH
His/her Royal Highness (HRH)

63. USN rank ENS
Ensign (ens.)

67. Mideast leadership family name ASSAD
Dr. Bashar al-Assad is the current President of the Syrian Arab Republic and the son of the former President Hafez al-Assad whom he replaced in 2001. President Assad is a medical doctor, speaks fluent English and conversational French. Assad was studying ophthalmology in London when he met his wife, who is an Englishwoman.

71. ICU worker LPN
A licensed practical nurse (LPN) might work in an intensive care unit (ICU).

72. Old flood insurance? ARK
The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah’s life-preserver during the flood.

79. Organic fertilizer GUANO
Guano is the droppings of seabirds, bats and seals. It is prized as fertilizer as it doesn’t really smell, and contains high levels of phosphorous and nitrogen. The word “guano” means “seabird droppings” in the Quichua language spoken in the Andes region of South America.

86. Seaman’s protective garment OILSKIN
An oilskin is a waterproof garment worn especially by sailors. The original garments were made of sailcloth that was waterproofed with tar.

88. Illusions MIRAGES
A mirage occurs when light rays are bent by passing say from cold air to warmer air. The most often cited mirage is a “lake” seen in a desert, which is actually the blue of the sky and not water at all. The word “mirage” comes to us via French from the Latin “mirare” meaning “to look at in wonder”. “Mirage” has the same root as our words “admire” and “mirror”.

91. Debacle FIASCO
Back in the mid-1800s, “fiasco” was theater slang meaning “failure in performance”. The meaning morphed soon after into any kind of failure or flop. The term evolved from the Italian “far fiasco”, a phrase that the same meaning in Italian theater, but translated literally as “make a bottle”. It turns out that “fiasco” and “flask” both derive from the Latin “flasco” meaning “bottle”.

A “debacle” is a disaster, and is a French word with the same meaning. In French, the term originally was used for the breaking up of ice on a river.

97. Poet Matthew buried in Westminster Abbey PRIOR
Matthew Prior was a poet and diplomat from England whose work was published in the first part of the 18th century. Some of Prior’s best work was written while he was in prison from 1715 to 1717. He was placed in custody largely as a political move Robert Walpole, who later became the first Prime Minister of Britain.

99. FAQ part ASKED
Most websites have a page listing answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). There is a link to this blog’s FAQ page at the top-right of every page.

102. One in a ball game? SEER
A seer might use a crystal ball.

103. Bk. with synonyms THES
The first person to use the term “thesaurus” to mean a “collection of words arranged according to sense” was Roget in 1852, when he used it for the title of his most famous work. Up to that point in time, a thesaurus was basically an encyclopedia. Before being used with reference to books, a thesaurus was a storehouse or treasury, coming from the Latin “thesaurus” meaning “treasury, treasure”.

105. Sea lion predator ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

There are three families of seals. The first is the walrus family, the second the eared seals (like sea lions), and thirdly the earless seals.

107. Blasting material TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

110. Caucus organizer: Abbr. DNC
The Democratic National Committee (DNC) was set up way back in 1848, and governs the day-to-day affairs of the Democratic Party. Past chairpersons of the DNC include Howard Dean from Vermont and Chris Dodd from Connecticut.

A “caucus” is a meeting of supporters of a particular political group. It is believed that the term was first used in the original North American colonies.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Route with many turns SLALOM
7. Command to a guard dog SIC ‘EM
12. Cap with a feather, to Yankee Doodle MACARONI
20. Way out? PAROLE
21. Budget rival ALAMO
22. Cosmetic oil source AVOCADOS
23. Saloon with a strict no-quipping policy? ANTI-DROLL BAR (from “antiroll bar”)
25. Hallucinatory state DELIRIUM
26. App symbol ICON
27. Basic chem. unit MOL
28. “There’s __ for that” A NAME
30. Port on the Danish island Fyn ODENSE
31. “The Matrix” hero NEO
32. Wraparound garment SARI
33. Simba’s mate NALA
34. NFL commentator Collinsworth CRIS
35. Art class focused on river rapids? WHITEWATER DRAFTING (from “whitewater rafting”)
41. Brought up REARED
44. Suffix with polymer -ASE
45. Hide-and-seek word READY
46. “Go jump in the loch!” NAE!
47. Take up, say ALTER
48. Data-transfer meas. BPS
50. San Jose-based tech giant CISCO
51. Wag CARD
52. Has the downspouts inspected? GETS A DRAIN CHECK (from “gets a rain check”)
56. “Big” star HANKS
57. Sieben-neun link ACHT
58. Porridge bit OAT
59. Miffed IRED
60. Board game based on pachisi SORRY!
62. Subway fixtures STILES
64. Fencing tools EPEES
65. Primate in “Tarzan” films CHEETA
68. Muscular power SINEW
70. Grieg’s “__ Death” ASE’S
71. Delt neighbor LAT
73. Perón and others EVAS
74. Jam cacophony HORNS
76. Portrait of Donald’s life? A DRAKE’S PROGRESS (from “A Rake’s Progress”)
80. “So I’m cuter,” to Tom Cruise: Abbr. ANAG
81. Brooklyn institute PRATT
82. Cephalopod’s defense INK
83. Range in NE Utah UINTA
84. Nonsense ROT
85. Juvenile response I AM SO!
86. Suffix with human -OID
88. Sailing term preceded by a number MASTED
89. Worries about contract details? DREADS THE FINE PRINT (from “reads the fine print”)
94. Light bite NOSH
95. Isn’t up to par AILS
96. 100 cents EURO
97. Ryder Cup org. PGA
100. Pain HASSLE
103. Refuse TRASH
104. Fjord kin RIA
105. Vein extracts ORES
106. Shoe specification EEE WIDTH
108. Refreshment after some winter recreation? SKATING DRINK (from “skating rink”)
111. Customs-exempt storage facility FREE ZONE
112. Anthrax-prevention drug CIPRO
113. Concert cry ENCORE
114. Downpours TORRENTS
115. Start of the Common Era ONE AD
116. Cowed SCARED

Down
1. Mediterranean land SPAIN
2. Medieval Times prop LANCE
3. Lovable droid ARTOO
4. Butcher’s cut LOIN
5. __ school OLD
6. Madison in “Splash,” as it turns out MERMAID
7. __ Mae SALLIE
8. Not up to par ILL
9. Changing places CABANAS
10. Flow (from) EMANATE
11. Pep talk target MORALE
12. Earned MADE
13. Postal address abbr. AVE
14. State bordering seven others COLORADO
15. Turn sour ACIDIFY
16. Least cooked RAREST
17. God with an eight-legged horse ODIN
18. Toi et moi NOUS
19. “Woe __!” IS ME
24. __ cloud: comet-filled region in interstellar space OORT
29. Wedded couples MARRIEDS
32. He-Man’s twin SHE-RA
34. Solves CRACKS
35. Sport with pins WRESTLING
36. “Where __?” WAS I
37. Fam. tree member DESC
38. Regardless IN ANY EVENT
39. British stoolie NARK
40. Night sch. goals GEDS
41. Sitar tunes RAGAS
42. Campaign sign word ELECT
43. “The way things are going … ” AT THIS RATE …
48. Olga product BRA
49. Square spread on a slice PAT
50. Burger topper CHEESE
51. Workaholic CAREERIST
53. Teaspoon, e.g. DOSE
54. Goes for, puppy-style NIPS AT
55. Brook CREEK
56. Princely letters HRH
61. Prefix with pod OCTO-
63. USN rank ENS
64. Like some grins EAR TO EAR
66. Try TASTE
67. Mideast leadership family name ASSAD
69. Friendliness WARMTH
71. ICU worker LPN
72. Old flood insurance? ARK
74. Like some facts and stuff HARD
75. __ about ON OR
77. Go like mad DASH
78. Steamed veggies, say SIDE
79. Organic fertilizer GUANO
81. Relayed PASSED ON
85. Revere IDOLIZE
86. Seaman’s protective garment OILSKIN
87. Fit IN SHAPE
88. Illusions MIRAGES
90. Pick up the phone ANSWER
91. Debacle FIASCO
92. ” … and that’s final” … PERIOD
93. Total RUIN
97. Poet Matthew buried in Westminster Abbey PRIOR
98. Category GENRE
99. FAQ part ASKED
100. Test by lifting HEFT
101. Aviation prefix AERO-
102. One in a ball game? SEER
103. Bk. with synonyms THES
105. Sea lion predator ORCA
107. Blasting material TNT
109. Refrain start TRA
110. Caucus organizer: Abbr. DNC

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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Aug 15, Sunday”

  1. I've made this point before, but here it is again anyway: The Hebrew "Tevah" is simply a "box" or even just a "container". In Israel today a P.O. Box is a "Tevat Do'ar", universally abbreviated to "T(av) D(alet)". (Maybe in this context you can still argue that it is a metaphorical "life preserver" as the "Do'ar" – slow mail – seems to be going the way of all flesh).

  2. Having been in a few jam sessions, I would guess the term might more deeply refer to a miss-mosh of things being thrown together, as in a jam for eating, with maybe a 50/50% chance of something sweet coming out of the product. Always worth the try 🙂

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