LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Aug 15, Friday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeffrey Wechsler
THEME: Poetry in Motion … each of today’s themed answers includes a hidden string of letters. That string of letters is P-O-E-T-R-Y, but in a different order, IN MOTION:

58A. Metaphor for ballet … or what this puzzle’s circles literally contain POETRY IN MOTION

16A. Formal dissent MINORITY REPORT
22A. Lead role in many a Western STEREOTYPE
37A. Independence Day VIPs PYROTECHNICIANS
50A. Vegan diet component SOY PROTEIN

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 35s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. “It came without ribbons. It came without __”: The Grinch TAGS
And the Grinch, with his Grinch-feet ice cold in the snow, stood puzzling and puzzling, how could it be so? It came without ribbons. It came without tags. It came without packages, boxes or bags. And he puzzled and puzzled ’till his puzzler was sore. Then the Grinch thought of something he hadn’t before. What if Christmas, he thought, doesn’t come from a store. What if Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.

The Grinch is the title character in Dr. Seuss’s 1957 children’s book “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” Based on Seuss’s hero, we now use the term “grinch” for someone opposed to Christmas festivities or coarse and greedy in general.

13. Layered snack OREO
There’s an iPhone app featuring the Oreo cookie. It’s a game in which one twists Oreo cookies apart, “licks” the cream from the center and then dunks the remainder of the cookie in a glass of milk.

14. Sch. with residence halls named Acadian and Beauregard LSU
LSU’s full name is Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College.

The great explorer Verrazzano gave the name “Arcadia” to the coastal land that stretched from north of present day Virginia right up the North American continent to Nova Scotia. The name Arcadia was chosen as it was also the name for a part of Greece that had been viewed as idyllic from the days of classical antiquity. The “Arcadia” name quickly evolved into the word “Acadia” that was used locally here in North America. Much of Acadia was settled by the French in the 1600s, and then in 1710 Acadia was conquered by the British. There followed the French and Indian War after which there was a mass migration of French Acadians, often via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the French colony of Louisiana. The local dialectic pronunciation of the word “Acadian” was “Cajun”, giving the name to the ethnic group for which Louisiana has been home for about 300 years.

P. G. T. Beauregard was a general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Beauregard’s most notable success was leading the defense of Petersburg, Virginia against vastly superior Union forces.

15. Crystal __ RADIO
A crystal radio is a passive receiver, meaning that it uses the power in the radio signal to produce sound and does not amplify that signal (it has no battery). The crystal in the radio acts as a primitive form of diode. The sound coming out of a crystal set is so low that you can only hear it with headphones.

20. Educator LeShan EDA
Eda LeShan wrote “When Your Child Drives You Crazy”, and was host of the PBS television show “How Do Your Children Grow?”

21. Fig. in TV’s “Suits” ATT
“Suits” is an entertaining show about two lawyers that has aired on the USA Network since 2011. I binge-watched the show on Amazon Prime not so long ago, and thoroughly enjoyed it.

28. Cheap sauce HOOCH
In the Klondike gold rush, a favorite tipple of the miners was “Hoochinoo”, a liquor made by the native Alaskans. Soon after “hooch” (also “hootch”) was adopted as a word for cheap whiskey.

35. Org. of former Soviet republics CIS
The Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) is a loose association of countries that were former soviet republics. The CIS was formed in 1991 by Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, with six other states joining the alliance later.

41. It’s found in bars SOAP
Soap is basically made by adding a strong alkali (like lye) to a fat (like olive oil or palm oil). The fats break down in the basic solution in a process called saponification. The crude soap is extracted from the mixture, washed, purified and finished in molds.

44. Obedience trials org. AKC
The American Kennel Club (AKC) is the organization that handles registration of purebred dogs The AKC also promotes dog shows around the country including the famous Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

50. Vegan diet component SOY PROTEIN
What are known as soybeans here in the US are called “soya beans” in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink “soya milk”.

53. “Quadrophenia” group, with “The” WHO
“Quadrophenia” was the second rock opera by the Who (“Tommy” being the first, and more famous).

The English rock band called the Who was formed in 1964, bringing together famed musicians Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend, John Entwistle and Keith Moon. According to “Rolling Stone” magazine, the Who were the third arm of the holy trinity of British rock, alongside the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

54. Med. recording EEG
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is “brain dead”.

55. Four-time US Open winner MCENROE
Former tennis pro John McEnroe is known for his prowess on the court, as well his fiery temper. He was one of the great characters of his day, and had many grudge matches against the likes of Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors and Ivan Lendl. In 1984, McEnroe won 82 out of 85 matches, a winning record that still stands to this day.

63. Word on a menu CARTE
“Carte” is a word sometimes used in French for a menu. Menu items that are “à la carte” are priced and ordered separately, as opposed to “table d’hôte” which is a fixed price menu with limited choice.

64. One rarely without a comb? BEE
Honey bees create a structure within their nests called a honeycomb that is used to contain their larvae and also to store honey and pollen. The honeycomb comprises hexagonal cells made from wax.

65. Klein of fashion ANNE
Anne Klein was a fashion designer from Brooklyn, New York.

67. Ware lead-in MAL-
“Malware” is a collective term for software and program code that is created to intentionally disrupt and exploit computer systems. Viruses, worms, trojan horses and spyware are all covered by the term. “Malware” is short for “malicious software”.

Down
2. Reign of Terror victims ARISTOCRACY
“Reign of Terror” is the name given to the violent months that marked the beginning of the French Revolution. The guillotine earned the nickname “the National Razor” during those days in 1793 and 1794, with tens of thousands of people losing their lives (and heads).

5. Public monument support PLINTH
A plinth is a block on which a column is based. The Greek word “plinthos” means “squared stone”.

8. Words to live by CREDOS
A creed or credo is a confession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. “Credo” is Latin for “I believe”.

11. Title for Edward Elgar SIR
Sir Edward Elgar was the quintessential English composer, inextricably associated with his “Pomp and Circumstance” marches (including “Land of Hope and Glory”) and the “Enigma Variations”.

17. __ judicata: decided case RES
“Res judicata” is a term used in the law for a decided case, which translates from Latin as “a matter already judged”.

27. Unadon fillets EELS
Unadon is the Japanese word for “eel bowl”. Unadon is actually a contraction of “unagi no kabayaki” (grilled eel) and “donburi” (rice bowl dish).

36. Ivory alternative DIAL
Dial was the first antibacterial soap introduced in the US. It was given the name “Dial” as it was touted as offering “round-the-clock” protection against any odors caused by perspiration.

Ivory soap is one of Procter & Gambles oldest products, introduced way back in 1879. Ivory soap is noted for its “purity” and also because of its property of floating in water. Despite urban myths to the contrary, the property of floating in water was developed deliberately by a chemist at the time Ivory was being formulated. The soap floats because the ingredients are mixed longer than necessary for homogenization, which introduces more air into the product.

37. Spots for Smokey: Abbr. PSAS
Public service announcement (PSA)

Smokey Bear is the mascot of the US Forest Service. Smokey first appeared in 1944, in an advertising campaign directed towards preventing forest fires.

38. Mother of Sean YOKO
Sean Taro Ono Lennon is the only child of John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Sean’s godfather is Elton John. Sean is a musician and composer, and has a band called the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

45. Monastère members FRERES
In French, abbots (abbés) and brothers/monks (frères) might live in a monastery (un monastère).

46. Late-night host since 2003 KIMMEL
Jimmy Kimmel is currently the host of the late-night talk show “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” Kimmel also co-hosted “The Man Show” and my personal favorite, “Win Ben Stein’s Money”.

52. Sgt., e.g. NCO
An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

56. List substitute ET AL
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

57. Diamond complement NINE
There are nine players on a baseball team, on a baseball diamond.

60. Baseball stat ERA
Earned run average (ERA)

61. Longtime maker of 58-Down IBM
(58. See 61-Down PCS)
The original IBM Personal Computer is model number 5150, which was introduced to the world on August 12, 1981. The term “personal computer” was already in use, but the success of the IBM 5150 led to the term “PC” being used for all computer products compatible with the IBM platform.

62. Org. supporting exhibitions NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark. I wonder how long that will last though …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “It came without ribbons. It came without __”: The Grinch TAGS
5. Glutton PIG
8. Be at loggerheads CLASH
13. Layered snack OREO
14. Sch. with residence halls named Acadian and Beauregard LSU
15. Crystal __ RADIO
16. Formal dissent MINORITY REPORT
19. Decimal system foundation BASE TEN
20. Educator LeShan EDA
21. Fig. in TV’s “Suits” ATT
22. Lead role in many a Western STEREOTYPE
28. Cheap sauce HOOCH
31. Transports HAULS
32. Appreciative cry OLE!
33. Rocky prominence CRAG
35. Org. of former Soviet republics CIS
36. Paired DUAL
37. Independence Day VIPs PYROTECHNICIANS
41. It’s found in bars SOAP
42. “I see what’s going on!” OHO!
43. In the area NEAR
44. Obedience trials org. AKC
45. __ steak FLANK
47. Dropped off SLEPT
50. Vegan diet component SOY PROTEIN
53. “Quadrophenia” group, with “The” WHO
54. Med. recording EEG
55. Four-time US Open winner MCENROE
58. Metaphor for ballet … or what this puzzle’s circles literally contain POETRY IN MOTION
63. Word on a menu CARTE
64. One rarely without a comb? BEE
65. Klein of fashion ANNE
66. Stopovers STAYS
67. Ware lead-in MAL-
68. Long-term appeal LEGS

Down
1. Burger go-with TOMATO
2. Reign of Terror victims ARISTOCRACY
3. Biological determinant GENE
4. Laundry woe at the Claus home? SOOT
5. Public monument support PLINTH
6. Real ending? -IST
7. Dude GUY
8. Words to live by CREDOS
9. Gently massage, wave-style LAP AT
10. Big deal ADO
11. Title for Edward Elgar SIR
12. Popular HOT
17. __ judicata: decided case RES
18. Catches REELS IN
19. “What nonsense!” BAH!
23. All EACH ONE
24. Archaeological site RUIN
25. “What nonsense!” YOU ARE WRONG!
26. Work out the details PLAN
27. Unadon fillets EELS
29. Corn, for example CROP
30. One may be passed HAT
34. Rocky field? GEOLOGY
36. Ivory alternative DIAL
37. Spots for Smokey: Abbr. PSAS
38. Mother of Sean YOKO
39. Shoot the breeze CHAT
40. These, to Thérèse CES
45. Monastère members FRERES
46. Late-night host since 2003 KIMMEL
48. Obsolescent public conveniences PHONES
49. Word with dance or shoe TOE
51. Small-minded PETTY
52. Sgt., e.g. NCO
56. List substitute ET AL
57. Diamond complement NINE
58. See 61-Down PCS
59. Bit in a horse’s mouth? OAT
60. Baseball stat ERA
61. Longtime maker of 58-Down IBM
62. Org. supporting exhibitions NEA

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7 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Aug 15, Friday”

  1. Somehow I completed this grid. I must of used up a barrel of ink with the strike overs, but finally it came to a successful conclusion with the NE corner. Instead of eating it I'm crowing! (g)

    Hope everyone has a great Friday. At least we only have 3 or so more days of the heat before the sea breeze kicks back in and the hot weather abates.

  2. I saw Jeffrey Wechsler and circles on a Friday puzzle. The outlook was bleak. Ultimately I got the letters for the circles, all of the themed answers and was able to finish the puzzle after a ridiculously long time. The NE caused me the most fits, and I put HIT and RADII rather than HOT and RADIO. Ouch.

    I used to have a math teacher who when talking about solutions to problems always said "if it's not completely right, it's completely wrong.". I guess crosswords are the same. One mistake and the puzzle is wrong…..sigh. So close.

    Good puzzle though. Very "Friday-worthy" imho.

    Who knew you had to wash soap?? Almost put McIlroy before McEnroe, but I was thinking there's no way he has won 4 U.S. opens (golf) just yet. Got PLINTH entirely by crosses.

    Oh well. Next up is being beaten up by the Saturday puzzle, but at least it's the weekend.

    Best –

  3. Took a while to iron out the kinks, but a good challenge. PLINTH is definitely the word of the day. I should have picked up LSU quicker from the Acadian reference. Speaking of golf, the largest bank of pay PHONES in the U.S. is at Augusta, because they do not allow cell phones on the grounds.

  4. Bill, thanks so much for describing the full story behind Acadia/ Arcadia. Makes a lot more sense to me now.

    John McEnroe, one of the great characters of his day. "You cannot be serious!" (just kidding) 🙂

  5. ….forgot to add my brush with "greatness": The girl I took to my senior prom in high school had a professional tennis player for a brother. He beat both John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors in the same calendar year. Although you've probably never heard of him, that's quite a claim to fame…

  6. Well, Jeff, who was he??
    Meanwhile–YAY!! DNF, but did really well. Accidentally saw MINORITY REPORT when I attempted to cheat on another answer. Saw the circled letters and immediately saw "poetry" and got the theme answer! I have to brag about my little successes, since Fridays usually slay me.
    ===Until tomorrow!===

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