LA Times Crossword Answers 1 Oct 15, Thursday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jerry Edelstein
THEME: Where’s the Fire? … today’s themed answers are in two parts, and each is a word that can be preceded by FIRE:

55A. With 61-Across, radar trap question … and a hint to what can precede each part of the answers to 3-, 6-, 30- and 40-Down WHERE’S
61A. See 55-Across THE FIRE?

3D. Cheaper market option HOUSE BRAND (giving “firehouse” & “firebrand”)
6D. “Jaws” shark, e.g. MAN-EATER (giving “fireman” & “fire-eater”)
30D. Protected from violent weather STORMPROOF (giving “firestorm” & “fireproof”)
40D. Keep at it PLUG AWAY (giving “fireplug” & “fire away”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 49s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Performance enhancement banned by MLB HGH
Human growth hormone (HGH)

4. Descartes’ conclusion … I AM
The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement in Latin, “Cogito ergo sum”. This translates into French as “Je pense, donc je suis” and into English as “I think, therefore I am”.

14. “Evil Woman” gp. ELO
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) recorded the song “Evil Woman” in 1975. “Evil Woman” was written by the band’s lead vocalist Jeff Lynne, in just thirty minutes!

15. Govt. benefits org. SSA
The Social Security Administration (SSA) was set up as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The first person to receive a monthly retirement benefit was Ida May Fuller of Vermont who received her first check for the sum of $22.54 after having contributed for three years through payroll taxes. The New Deal turned out to be a good deal for Ms. Fuller, as she lived to 100 years of age and received a total benefit of almost $23,000, whereas her three years of contributions added up to just $24.75.

22. __ Gay ENOLA
The Enola Gay was the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb, on Hiroshima in August 1945. Enola Gay was the name of the mother of pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr.

23. Waikiki wreath LEI
Waikiki is a neighborhood of Honolulu, home to the famous Waikiki Beach. The name “Waikiki” means “spouting fresh water” in Hawaiian.

24. “Green Acres” co-star GABOR
Eva Gabor was the youngest of the Gabor sisters, all three of whom were celebrated Hollywood actresses and socialites (her siblings were Zsa-Zsa and Magda). The Gabor sisters were born in Budapest and immigrated to the United States separately, with Eva being the first to arrive. Eva broke into movies, but her most famous role was on the TV sitcom “Green Acres” in which she played the lovely character Lisa Douglas opposite Eddie Albert. One of Eva’s claims to fame is the unwitting promotion of the game called “Twister”, the sales of which were languishing in 1996. In an appearance on “The Tonight Show” she got on all fours and played the game with Johnny Carson. Sales took off immediately, and Twister became a huge hit.

The popular sitcom “Green Acres” originally aired from 1965 to 1971. The magnificent stars of the show were Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor, playing a couple who moved from New York City to a farm in the country. “Green Acres” was cancelled as part of CBS’s so called “rural purge”. In a move to attract younger audiences, shows were added to the schedule with more urban and contemporary themes. Classics like “The Beverly Hillbillies”, “Hee Haw” and “Mayberry R.F.D.” were dropped at the same time as “Green Acres”.

26. “__ We Meet Again”: 1940 romance film ‘TIL
1940’s “‘Til We Meet Again” is a remake of 1932’s “One Way Passage”. The latter stars William Powell and Kay Francis, and the former George Brent and Merle Oberon. The storyline of both films features two people who meet and fall in love on an ocean liner. However, the lovers are doomed, as the man is under sentence to be hanged, and the woman has a few weeks to love due to a weakened heart. I liked “One Way Passage” …

28. 2006 skating silver medalist Cohen SASHA
Sasha Cohen is an American figure skater from Westwood, California. Cohen’s mother is a former ballet dancer who immigrated here from Ukraine. “Sasha” is a Russian diminutive of Cohen’s birth name of “Alexandra”.

33. Classic sci-fi play RUR
Karel Čapek was a Czech writer noted for his works of science fiction. Čapek’s 1920 play “R.U.R.” is remembered in part for introducing the world to the word “robot”. The words “automaton” and “android” were already in use, but Capek gave us “robot” from the original Czech “robota” meaning “forced labor”. The acronym “R.U.R.”, in the context of the play, stands for “Rossum’s Universal Robots”.

36. Gossips YENTAS
Yenta (also “Yente”) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater “yenta” came to mean a busybody.

37. “The Wealth of Nations” author Smith ADAM
Adam Smith was a pioneer in the field of “political economy”, an original term used for the study of production and trade and their relationship with law, government and the distribution of wealth. Adam Smith’s great work is called “The Wealth of Nations”, published in 1776. The book was a big hit within his own lifetime and went a long way to earning him the reputation as the father of modern economics and capitalism. Smith coined the phrase “the invisible hand of the market”, describing his assertion that a marketplace tends to self-regulate.

42. Muscle cords SINEWS
Tendons (also called “sinews”) are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle. We also use the term “sinew” to mean muscular power.

44. Snowman in “Frozen” OLAF
“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

46. 1973 Court decision alias ROE
Roe v. Wade was decided in a US District Court in Texas in 1970, and reached the Supreme Court on appeal. The basic decision by the Supreme Court was that a woman’s constitutional right to privacy applied to an abortion, but that this right had to be balanced with a state’s interest in protecting an unborn child and a mother’s health. The Court further defined that the state’s interest became stronger with each trimester of a pregnancy. So, in the first trimester the woman’s right to privacy outweighed any state interest. In the second trimester the state’s interest in maternal health was deemed to be strong enough to allow state regulation of abortion for the sake of the mother. In the third trimester the viability of the fetus dictated that the state’s interest in the unborn child came into play, so states could regulate or prohibit abortions, except in cases where the mother’s life was in danger. I’m no lawyer, but that’s my understanding of the initial Supreme Court decision …

47. MLB Network analyst Martinez PEDRO
Pedro Martinez is a retired baseball pitcher from the Dominican Republic. Martinez won the Cy Young Award three times, and was on the Boston Red Sox team that won the 2004 World Series.

48. A/C measure BTU
In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

51. What “I” may indicate RTE
The US Interstate System is more correctly known as the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, a nod to President Eisenhower who championed the construction. The President had come to recognise the value of the German autobahn system in his experiences during WWII, and resolved to give the US a similar infrastructure. In real terms, the US Interstate construction project is said to have been the largest public works project since the Pyramids of Egypt.

67. Longing YEN
The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

Down
1. Munich man HERR
In Germany, a “Mr.” (Herr) is married to a “Mrs.” (Frau), and they live together in a house (Haus).

Munich is the capital of the German state of Bavaria, and is the third largest city in the country (after Berlin and Hamburg). The city is called “München” in German, a term that derives from the Old German word for “by the monks’ place”, which is a reference to the monks of the Benedictine order who founded the city in 1158.

3. Cheaper market option HOUSE BRAND (giving “firehouse” & “firebrand”)
A firebrand is piece of burning wood that is used to kindle a fire. In a figurative sense, a firebrand is an agitator, someone who kindles passions.

4. Spanish encyclopedist St. __ of Seville ISIDORE
Saint Isidore was an Archbishop of Seville in the 7th century. Towards the end of his life, Isidore of Seville compiled and etymological encyclopedia titled “Etymologiae”. The wide-ranging work relies on other classical works for source material, including “Natural History” by Pliny the Elder. The title is a little misleading, as the work is focused on not only the origins of words, but varied topics such as grammar, mathematics, music and the Roman Catholic Church. Such was the importance of “Etymologiae” during the Middle Ages, that the Vatican actually considered naming Isidore the patron saint of the Internet.

6. “Jaws” shark, e.g. MAN-EATER (giving “fireman” & “fire-eater”)
Peter Benchley’s book “Jaws” is a great read. It was published in 1974, and the Steven Spielberg movie “Jaws” was released just one year later.

8. Break down, in a way PARSE
The verb “to parse” means “to state the parts of speech in a sentence”. “Parse” comes from the Latin word “pars” meaning “part”.

11. Site of the 2000 USS Cole attack ADEN
Aden is a seaport in Yemen, located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

The USS Cole is a guided missile destroyer with a homeport in Norfolk, Virginia. The Cole fell victim to a suicide attack in 2000 by Al-Qaeda bombers who detonated an explosion on a boat close to the navy vessel while it was at anchor in Aden. 17 of the Cole’s crew members were killed in the attack, which blew a hole in the port side of the ship.

13. Fla. summer setting EDT
Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

18. Young hombre NINO
In Spanish, a boy (niño) is a young man (hombre).

25. War hero Murphy AUDIE
Audie Murphy was a highly-decorated combat veteran from WWII before he launched a successful career as a Hollywood actor. One of his most famous films is 1955’s “To Hell and Back” that is based on Murphy’s own memoirs published in 1949. Sadly, he was killed in a private plane crash in 1971.

30. Protected from violent weather STORMPROOF (giving “firestorm” & “fireproof”)
A firestorm can be a natural phenomenon seen in large bush and forest fires. A firestorm is a fire of great intensity, such that the heat generates its own wind system, further intensifying and spreading the fire. Firestorms can also be created deliberately as acts of war, and were done so during intense fire bombings during WWII, most famously of Dresden and London.

31. Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum city HANOI
The Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum is a huge memorial to the former Vietnamese leader that is located at the center of Ba Dinh Square in Hanoi. The mausoleum’s design was inspired by Lenin’s Tomb in Red Square Moscow. Ho Chi Minh’s embalmed body is on display in a central hall in a glass case and visitors file past it every day to pay their respects.

38. Marseille sight MER
In French, the Mediterranean (La Méditerranée) is a sea (mer).

Marseille (often written “Marseilles” in English) is the second largest city in France, after Paris. Marseille is also the largest commercial port in the country. I used to live nearby, and it’s a lovely, lovely place.

40. Keep at it PLUG AWAY (giving “fireplug” & “fire away”)
A “fireplug” is fire hydrant, a connection point in that street that firefighters can use to tap into a water supply.

48. Lays siege to BESETS
Our word “siege” comes from a 13th century word for a “seat”. The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force “sitting down” outside a fortress until it falls.

56. “__ real nowhere man”: Beatles lyric HE’S A
“Nowhere Man” is an early song by the Beatles, released in 1966. “Nowhere Man” was one of the first songs that John Lennon wrote that was more philosophical than romantic in nature, indicative of songs to come. Apparently, Lennon himself is the inspiration for the “Nowhere Man” persona.

57. Young newts EFTS
Newts wouldn’t be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

59. Vatican City coin EURO
Vatican City is not a member of the European Union (EU), but does the euro as its official currency by virtue of a special agreement with the EU. Vatican City is allowed to issue a limited number of its own euro coins, but no banknotes. The cap on the number of coins issued is raised in the year that a new pope is named. As a result of the limitations, Vatican euro coins are highly prized by collectors.

61. FDR power project TVA
The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has to be one of America’s great success stories when it comes to economic development. Created in 1933, the TVA spearheaded economic development in the Tennessee Valley at the height of the Great Depression. Central to the success was the federally-funded construction of flood-control and electricity-generation facilities.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Performance enhancement banned by MLB HGH
4. Descartes’ conclusion … I AM
7. Placate APPEASE
14. “Evil Woman” gp. ELO
15. Govt. benefits org. SSA
16. Strutted PARADED
17. Annual get-together REUNION
19. Stop PREVENT
20. Ash, for example RESIDUE
21. Rise ASCEND
22. __ Gay ENOLA
23. Waikiki wreath LEI
24. “Green Acres” co-star GABOR
26. “__ We Meet Again”: 1940 romance film ‘TIL
28. 2006 skating silver medalist Cohen SASHA
33. Classic sci-fi play RUR
34. Squeezed (out) EKED
36. Gossips YENTAS
37. “The Wealth of Nations” author Smith ADAM
39. Complaint GRIPE
41. Puts on DONS
42. Muscle cords SINEWS
44. Snowman in “Frozen” OLAF
46. 1973 Court decision alias ROE
47. MLB Network analyst Martinez PEDRO
48. A/C measure BTU
49. Take the blame for ADMIT
51. What “I” may indicate RTE
53. Fill the tank GAS UP
55. With 61-Across, radar trap question … and a hint to what can precede each part of the answers to 3-, 6-, 30- and 40-Down WHERE’S
58. Sticks ADHERES
61. See 55-Across THE FIRE?
62. Hunker down for the duration of WAIT OUT
63. Most extensive VASTEST
64. In times past AGO
65. Miner’s reward ORE
66. Accumulates AMASSES
67. Longing YEN
68. Dandy FOP

Down
1. Munich man HERR
2. Joy GLEE
3. Cheaper market option HOUSE BRAND (giving “firehouse” & “firebrand”)
4. Spanish encyclopedist St. __ of Seville ISIDORE
5. Nary __: no one A SOUL
6. “Jaws” shark, e.g. MAN-EATER (giving “fireman” & “fire-eater”)
7. Horrify APPALL
8. Break down, in a way PARSE
9. Exact PRECISE
10. Roof extension EAVE
11. Site of the 2000 USS Cole attack ADEN
12. Email SEND
13. Fla. summer setting EDT
18. Young hombre NINO
24. Understand GRASP
25. War hero Murphy AUDIE
27. Fool IDIOT
29. Common link AND
30. Protected from violent weather STORMPROOF (giving “firestorm” & “fireproof”)
31. Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum city HANOI
32. Diamonds, say ASSET
35. Metric wts. KGS
36. Vocal nod YEA
38. Marseille sight MER
40. Keep at it PLUG AWAY (giving “fireplug” & “fire away”)
43. Troubles WORRIES
45. Style FASHION
48. Lays siege to BESETS
50. Piano piece for four hands DUET
52. Concise TERSE
54. Old saw ADAGE
55. Impact sound WHAM!
56. “__ real nowhere man”: Beatles lyric HE’S A
57. Young newts EFTS
59. Vatican City coin EURO
60. Word often followed by a number or letter STEP
61. FDR power project TVA

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6 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 1 Oct 15, Thursday”

  1. Actually got through this one. Of course, I had to pick up 3 minor errors in the process. My biggest gripe is 51-Across (EGO instead of RTE). I figured out it was wrong and looked it up, since the clue didn't make an logical sense at all in light of the answer for it to suggest any other answer.

    The other two were one letter off (55-Down and 15-Across, phonetic sounds and alphabet soup are grating in these grids anyway), and really can't complain on those.

    Anyhow, we'll see what Friday brings.

  2. Very Wednesday-like at the top but it became more Thursday-ish at the bottom. I finally finished error free.

    I'll let Willie key up the Monty Pythpn reference to Descartes. Willie are you still out there?

    I wanted to just let this go…but I couldn't. I suspect I have some sort of undiagnosed disorder. A Kilogram is a unit of MASS – not WEIGHT…which is the force of gravity on a mass. An 80 kg man will also be 80 kgs in the weightlessness of space. But a 180 lb man will weigh 0 lbs in space. But it's become convention, it's accepted…I know I know. I guess I just never understood why it became accepted.

    FWIW – A Newton is the metric equivelent to a pound (1N=.225 lb). A slug is the british systems equivelent to a kilogram. 1 slug on earth = about 32 lbs. or about 14 kg.

    There – got that GRIPE out of my system…

    Best –

  3. Average for a Thursday, but I have a problem with some of the cluing. SINEWS aren't really muscle chords or tendons. They are generally called fibers or fibrils. HERR is more akin to "Mister" is German. "Man" would be Mann or Mensch. I did like the tidbit on St. Isidore, who is considered the "last scholar of the ancient world." Finally, RTE could also be clued as the state broadcast company of Ireland, Radio Telefis Eireann. 😉

  4. Possibly my best effort ever, and it's not even a Monday. I had some lucky guesses.

    Epee's job has apparently been taken by Rur, but I hope it passes soon.

    Bella

  5. Hi gang!
    Guess I was on Mr. Edelstein's wavelength today. Finished without error and did not realize both words competed "FIRE".

  6. @Glenn – also had "ego" before RTE.

    Agree with @Willie on German words. But crossword creators no very little German and too much French. Now that both are out of the running for most important language, I wish they all would forget the French and stick with Spanish.

    I Googled 3x, including ISIDORE – an educational moment.

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