LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Oct 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Amy Johnson
THEME: Playing with your Food … each of today’s themed answers is a well-known phrase, but with one word changed to a food item that sounds similar to the original word:

23A. Diet for ice cream lovers? A MONTH OF SUNDAES (sounds like “a month of Sundays”)
39A. Farce set in a sandwich shop? RYE COMEDY (sounds like “wry comedy”)
60A. Top for a beach cookout? MUSSEL SHIRT (sounds like “muscle shirt”)
85A. Cake recipe overhaul? TORTE REFORM (sounds like “tort reform”)
102A. Thanksgiving week for a baker? LIFE OF PIE (sounds life “Life of Pi”)
122A. Affair for dessert-loving bovines? BULL MOUSSE PARTY (sounds like “Bull Moose Party”)
15D. Group that thrived during the borscht years? BEET GENERATION (sounds like “Beat Generation”)
52D. Period of terror induced by a brat? WURST NIGHTMARE (sounds like “worst nightmare”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 25s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Chariot-riding god ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of blood-lust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos, Deimos and Eros. The Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

5. Athletic org. since 1894 USOC
The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has a federal charter but it doesn’t receive any funds from the US government. As such, it has to engage in fundraising just like any other charitable organization. The USOC was founded in 1894, and is headquartered in Colorado Springs.

18. Two-thumbs-up review RAVE
Roger Ebert co-hosted a succession of film review television programs for over 23 years, most famously with Gene Siskel until Siskel passed away in 1999. Siskel and Ebert famously gave their thumbs up or thumbs down to the movies they reviewed.

19. Obeyed a court order STOOD
All rise …

22. Hymn to Apollo, say PAEAN
A paean is a poem or song that expresses triumph or thanksgiving. “Paean” comes from the ancient Greek “paian” meaning “song of triumph”.

In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto, and the twin brother of the goddess Artemis. Among other things, Apollo was worshiped as a god of light and the sun, truth and prophecy, as well as healing and plague.

23. Diet for ice cream lovers? A MONTH OF SUNDAES (sounds like “a month of Sundays”)
There’s a lot of speculation about how the dessert called a sundae got its name, but there seems to be agreement that it is an alteration of the word “Sunday”.

26. George who was the A.L. batting champ in three different decades BRETT
George Brett played his entire professional baseball career with the Kansas City Royals. Brett made more hits than any other third baseman in Major League history.

31. Ordinal extremes NTHS
Ordinal numbers express a position in a series, i.e. first, second, third etc.

34. Rubik’s creation CUBE
What was originally called the “Magic Cube” became better known as Rubik’s Cube, named for its inventor Ernő Rubik. Rubik’s Cube is the world’s biggest selling puzzle game, with over 350 million sold in just over 30 years.

36. Annoy your bedmate SAW LOGS
“To saw logs” is to snore, to make a sound like the sawing of logs.

38. __ Bo TAE
Tae Bo isn’t an ancient martial art, and rather was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s. The discipline was introduced by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of “taekwondo” and “boxing”.

44. Like Simba REGAL
Among the group of lions at the center of “The Lion King” story, young Simba is the heir apparent, the lion cub destined to take over as leader of the pride. His uncle is jealous of Simba, and plots with a trio of hyenas to kill Simba, so that he can take his position. The uncle was originally named Taka (according to books) but he was given the name Scar after being injured by a buffalo. The trio of hyenas are called Shenzi, Banzai and Ed.

45. “In __ of gifts … ” LIEU
As one might perhaps imagine, “in lieu” comes into English from the Old French word “lieu” meaning “place”, which in turn is derived from the Latin “locum”, also meaning “place”. So, “in lieu” means “in place of”.

50. Premier League soccer anchor Rebecca LOWE
Rebecca Lowe is a sportscaster working for NBC. Rebecca is from London, and is the daughter of Chris Lowe, a former newscaster for the BBC for almost 40 years. Lowe is married to Paul Buckle, the head coach for the Sacramento Republic soccer team.

53. Many a Mormon UTAHN
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, often abbreviated to “LDS”, is known colloquially as the Mormon Church.

56. Inked on TV’s “Ink Master” TATTED
“Ink Master” is a reality television show that has been airing on Spike since 2012. The show is a competition between tattoo artists. I don’t think I would like to tattooed as part of a competition. I don’t think I would like to be tattooed at all …

58. Juan’s first lady EVA
Eva Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón who was in office from 1946 to 1955. The Argentine First Lady was known affectionately by the people as “Evita”, the Spanish language diminutive of “Eva”. “Evita” was also the follow-up musical to “Jesus Christ Superstar” for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, and was based on the life of Eva Perón.

59. Israeli statesman Barak EHUD
Ehud Barak served as Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001. Barak left office after he called a special election for Prime Minister and lost the vote to Ariel Sharon. Barak resigned from the Knesset and took an advisory job with the US company Electronic Data Systems (EDS), and did some security-related work with a private equity company. In 2007, Barak took over leadership of Israel’s Labor Party.

62. Arrogant “South Park” kid ERIC
“South Park” is an adult-oriented cartoon series on Comedy Central. I don’t do “South Park” …

68. Brownie accessory SASH
Brownies are a members of the Girl Guiding organization who are seven to ten years old. When the group was founded in 1914 by Lord Baden-Powell, they were known as Rosebuds. That name wasn’t popular with the membership and so was changed, taking inspiration from an 1870 story by Juliana Horatia Ewing called “The Brownies”.

74. Wayne Manor ringer BATPHONE
The Batphone was introduced in the Batman comic books before gaining notoriety in the Batman television series of the sixties. The Batphone was Commissioner Gordon’s secure line to Batman. The term “batphone” is used quite a bit now in business, describing a private telephone number that is handled as a priority above the regular lines.

Wayne Manor is where Bruce Wayne lives, the alter-ego of Batman. It is a huge manor that lies just outside Gotham City. Looking after the house is the Wayne family servant, Alfred. Beneath the grounds of the manor is an extensive cave system where Bruce Wayne put together his Batcave. Access is to the cave is via a staircase behind a hidden door. The door is opened by moving the hands of a non-functioning grandfather clock to 10:47, the time at which Wayne’s parents were murdered. It is the murder of his parents that sets Bruce off on his journey of crime fighting.

81. One of more than four billion ASIAN
Most of the world’s population lives in Asia (60%), and Asia is the largest continent in terms of landmass (30% of the world). Asia also has the highest population density (246 people per square mile), and the most populous city on the continent is Shanghai, China.

85. Cake recipe overhaul? TORTE REFORM (sounds like “tort reform”)
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

The word “tort” is a French word meaning “mischief, injury or wrong”. Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

89. “The Addams Family” adjective OOKY

They’re creepy and they’re kooky,
Mysterious and spooky,
They’re altogether ooky,
The Addams Family.

90. Down Under school UNI
In Australia (Down Under) and in the British Isles the term “Uni” is routinely used for “university”.

91. Lima resident, maybe OHIOAN
Lima is a city located in northwestern Ohio, about 70 miles north of Dayton. The city is home to the Lima Army Tank Plant, where the M1 Abrams battle tank is produced. Lima is also home to the fictional William McKinley High School that is the setting for the TV series “Glee”.

92. Half a droid name DETOO
Artoo’s proper name is R2-D2. R2-D2 is the smaller of the two famous droids from the “Star Wars” movies. British actor Kenny Baker, who stands just 3 ft 8 ins tall, has been the man inside the R2-D2 droid for all six of the “Star Wars” movies.

94. Ziggy Marley’s genre REGGAE
Ziggy Marley is the oldest son of Bob and Rita Marley. Ziggy was the leader of the band Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers. The band’s original lineup consisted only of Bob Marley’s children.

98. Off-the-wall OUTRE
The word “outré” comes to us from French, as you might imagine, derived from the verb “outrer” meaning “to overdo, exaggerate”. “Outrer” is also the ultimate root of our word “outrage”.

102. Thanksgiving week for a baker? LIFE OF PIE (sounds life “Life of Pi”)
The 2012 movie “Life of Pi” is based on a 2001 novel of the same name by Yann Martel. The “Pi” in the title is an Indian boy named Pi Patel who finds himself adrift for 227 days in small boat with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

105. Tex.-based carrier SWA
Southwest Airlines is the world’s largest low-cost passenger airline. I’ve always admired the Southwest operation and found that the company knows to keep costs under control while maintaining a high level of customer service. One strategy the company used for decades was only to operate Boeing 737 aircraft, which kept maintenance and operating costs to a minimum.

108. Layered pastry STRUDEL
Strudel is a layered pastry that is usually sweet. The word “strudel” means “whirlpool, eddy” in German.

110. Gillette razor word TRAC
Gillette introduced the Trac II in 1971, when it became the world’s first twin-blade razor.

113. Word heard when pulling a string MAMA
One might pull a string on a doll to hear her say “Mama”. Although in this digital age, I doubt that’s true anymore …

114. “Find Your Own Road” sloganeer SAAB
SAAB stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. SAAB was, and still is, mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automotive division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000, who then sold it to a Dutch concern in 2010. However, SAAB (automotive) finally went bankrupt in 2011. A Chinese consortium purchased the assets of SAAB Automotive in 2012, and so SAAB vehicles are in production again. The new vehicles are using the SAAB name, but cannot use the SAAB griffin logo, the rights to which have been retained by the mother company.

116. Spaceship Earth setting EPCOT
EPCOT Center (now just called Epcot) is the theme park beside Walt Disney World in Florida. EPCOT is an acronym for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, and is a representation of the future as envisioned by Walt Disney. Walt Disney actually wanted to build a living community for 20,000 residents at EPCOT, but he passed away before that vision could be realized.

Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

122. Affair for dessert-loving bovines? BULL MOUSSE PARTY (sounds like “Bull Moose Party”)
After President Theodore Roosevelt left office in 1909, he became disillusioned with the direction being taken by his own Republican Party. Roosevelt decided to run for the presidency again, and in doing so formed the Progressive Party. The new organization became known as the Bull Moose Party after Roosevelt was quoted as saying “I feel like a bull moose” soon after the new party had been launched. Roosevelt had a very poor showing in the 1912 presidential election, and the Progressive Party dissolved a few years later, in 1916.

126. Latin 101 word ERAT
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

127. It sets in Spain EL SOL
In Spanish, the sun (el sol) rises in the east (este).

129. Almonds, e.g. SEEDS
Our everyday usage of “nut” is often at odds with the botanical definition of the term. Examples of “true nuts” are acorns, chestnuts and hazelnuts. On the other hand, even though we usually refer to almonds, pecans and walnuts as “nuts”, botanically they are classified as “drupes”. True nuts and drupes are both fruits, the vehicle that flowering plants use to disseminate seeds. True nuts are examples of a “dry fruit”, a fruit that has no fleshy outer layer. Drupes are examples of “fleshy fruits”, a fruit with a fleshy outer layer that often makes it desirable for an animal to eat. Familiar examples of drupes are cherries, peaches and plums. We eat the fleshy part of these drupes, and discard the pit inside that contains the seed. Other examples of drupes are walnuts, almonds and pecans. The relatively inedible flashy part of these drupes is usually removed for us before they hit our grocery stores shelves. We crack open the pit inside and eat the seed of these drupes. And while we do that, we forget that we’re eating something akin to a cherry or a peach, and we call it a nut!

132. Coastal fisher ERNE
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

Down
1. Longtime PLO chairman ARAFAT
Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father’s funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat’s explanation was that he wanted to “study the mentality” of the Jewish people.

The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was founded in 1964. The PLO’s early stated goal was the liberation of Palestine, with Palestine defined as the geographic entity that existed under the terms of the British Mandate granted by the League of Nations back in 1923. The PLO was granted observer status (i.e. no voting rights) at the United Nations in 1974.

2. Wyndham-owned brand RAMADA
The Ramada Inn hotel chain takes its name from the Spanish word for a shady resting place. A ramada is a shelter with a roof and no walls, mainly found in the American southwest. Nowadays a ramada can be temporary or permanent, but originally ramadas were makeshift shelters constructed by aboriginal Indians from branches or bushes.

4. Sixth __ SENSE
The so-called “sixth sense” is extrasensory perception (ESP).

5. Show to a seat, in slang USH
“To ush” is to usher, to show to a seat.

6. Greek meeting site STOA
A stoa was a covered walkway in Ancient Greece. A stoa usually consisted of columns lining the side of a building or buildings, with another row of columns defining the other side of the walkway. The columns supported a roof. Often stoae would surround marketplaces in large cities.

8. Sam’s competitor COSTCO
Costco is the largest warehouse club in the US. Apparently Costco is also the largest retailer of wine in the whole world. The company was founded in 1983 in Kirkland, Washington. Kirkland Signature is Costco’s store brand, and you can even buy Kirkland Signature wine.

Sam’s Club is owned and operated by Walmart and is named after the company’s founder, Sam Walton.

9. Janet Yellen’s org., with “The” FED
The economist Janet Yellen has been the Chair of the Federal Reserve since 2014, and is the first woman to hold the position.

The Federal Reserve System is more usually known simply as “the Fed”, and is the central banking system of the US. It was introduced in 1913 in response to a number of financial panics at the beginning of the 20th century. The original role for the Fed was to act as a lender of last resort, in case there was a run on a bank. This can happen as most of the money that is deposited by customers in a bank is reinvested by that bank, so it has very little liquid cash available. If too many customers look for their money at one time, then the bank can be short of cash and this can start a “run”. The Fed’s responsibilities have broadened since those early days …

10. Large deep-water fish OPAH
Opah is the more correct name for the fish also known as the sunfish, moonfish or Jerusalem haddock. I’ve seen one in the Monterrey Aquarium. It is huge …

12. Rice title vampire LESTAT
Anne Rice is an American author of erotic and Gothic novels. She was born Howard Allen O’Brien (no wonder she changed her name!). Her famous series of novels “The Vampire Chronicles” centers on her character Lestat de Lioncourt, a French nobleman who was turned into a vampire in the 18th century. One of the stories, “Interview with the Vampire”, was adapted for the big screen in 1994 and features Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt and others in a star-studded cast. Not my kind of movie though, as I don’t do vampires …

13. Call to cruisers, briefly APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

15. Group that thrived during the borscht years? BEET GENERATION (sounds like “Beat Generation”)
Borscht is a beetroot soup that originated in Ukraine. Borscht can be served both hot and cold.

Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg were part of the Beat Generation, American writers who embraced the beat culture of the fifties. The term “Beat Generation” was coined by Kerouac back in 1948, describing the youth of the day who had been “beaten down” and who were refusing to conform to the social norms of the time. The “beatniks” of the fifties, were to morph into the hippies of the sixties. It was Ginsberg who coined the phrase “flower power”, using it to portray the Vietnam War protests in a more positive light.

16. Censor’s targets OATHS
The original “censor” was an officer in ancient Rome who had responsibility for taking the “census”, i.e. counting the population, and for supervising public morality.

17. Blasting supplies TNTS
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

20. Pasta wheat DURUM
Durum wheat, also called “macaroni wheat” is a species with a high protein content that is commonly used as an ingredient in bread and pasta.

25. Prize since 1901 NOBEL
The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded “in memory of Alfred Nobel”. Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and that award is presented in Oslo.

30. Bug in a garage VW BEETLE
VW stands for Volkswagen, which translates from German into “people’s car”. The original Volkswagen design was the Beetle and was built under a directive from Adolf Hitler, who wanted a cheap car built that ordinary people could afford to purchase. He awarded the contract to engineer Ferdinand Porsche, whose name (paradoxically) would forever be associated with high performance, expensive cars. The Beetle was the official name of the VW model released in North America, but it was usually referred to as a “Bug” here in the US, and a “Beetle” elsewhere in the world.

37. Byron, for one LORD
George Gordon Byron, known simply as “Lord Byron”, was an English poet active in the early 1800s. Byron was equally as famous for his poetry as he was for the wild excesses in his personal life. Byron lived much of that life outside of England, and fought for revolutionaries in both Italy and Greece. He died from a fever contracted while fighting for the Greeks against the Ottomans.

44. Procedural impediment RED TAPE
Back in the days of yore in England, official documents were bound in bundles with red ribbon. So, getting through all the paperwork required “cutting through the red tape”.

48. “Amores” author OVID
Ovid wrote a book of poems called “Amores”, as did the author D. H. Lawrence.

The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets, Horace and Virgil.

49. MacArthur’s “best soldiers” WACS
The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was formed in 1942, and the unit was converted to full status the following year to become the Women’s Army Corps (WAC). Famously, General Douglas MacArthur referred to the WACs as his “best soldiers”, saying they worked harder, complained less and were better disciplined than men. The WACs were disbanded in 1978 and the serving members were integrated into the rest of the army.

50. Paul in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame LES
Les Paul was a guitarist, songwriter and inventor. When he was 33 years old, Paul was involved in a near-fatal car crash that left his right arm and elbow shattered. Surgeons offered him the choice of amputation or a rebuilding of the limb that would leave him unable to bend his elbow. He told them to set his arm at just under 90 degrees so that he could at least hold his guitar and perhaps play it.

51. “The jig is up!” OHO!
Back in Elizabethan times, a “jig” was a trick or game. So, the expression “the jig is up” has for some time meant “the trick or game is exposed”.

52. Period of terror induced by a brat? WURST NIGHTMARE (sounds like “worst nightmare”)
A bratwurst (sometimes “brat” in the US) is a German sausage. The name comes from “brät-” meaning “finely chopped meat”, and “Wurst” meaning “sausage”.

54. Early Chinese dynasty HSIA
The Xia (also “Hsia”) Dynasty was the first Chinese Dynasty, lasting from about 2070 to 1600 BCE.

55. Dick Van Patten’s “Mama” role NELS
The actor Dick Van Patten was best known for playing the father in the sitcom “Eight is Enough”. Off the screen, Van Patten was an animal enthusiast. In 2008 he founded National Guide Dog Month.

“Mama” is a comedy-drama series that originally ran from 1949 until 1957. It tells the story of a Norwegian family in San Francisco in the early 20th century. The series was based on a memoir by Kathryn Forbes titles “Mama’s Bank Account”. The memoir was adapted into a play by John Van Druten, and into a very successful 1948 film called “I Remember Mama” starring Irene Dunne.

61. Operettist Franz LEHAR
Franz Lehar was a Hungarian composer who had a difficult relationship with the Nazi regime after it took control of his country. His wife was born Jewish, but converted to Catholicism. Fortunately, Hitler enjoyed Lehar’s music and as a result Goebbels intervened and made Sophie Lehar “an honorary Aryan by marriage”.

67. Sumac from Peru YMA
Yma Sumac was a Peruvian soprano. Sumac had a notable vocal range of five octaves.

71. Column with a slant OP-ED
“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

72. Emilia, to Iago WIFE
Emilia and Iago are characters in William Shakespeare’s play “Othello”. Emilia and Iago are a married couple, although Iago kills Emilia late in the play.

76. “There’s __ in … ” NO I
There’s no “I” in “team”.

82. Letters for John Smith? AKA
Also known as (aka)

83. Buffalo locale: Abbr. NYS
Buffalo is the second most-populous city in the state of New York. The city takes its name from Buffalo Creek that runs through the metropolis (although the waterway is called Buffalo River within the city). The source of the name Buffalo Creek is the subject of much speculation, but one thing is clear, there were never any bison in the area.

87. Send a Dear John letter END IT
Apparently the term “Dear John letter” originated in WWII among American troops who were serving abroad. The servicemen highly valued letters from girlfriends and wives back home, and almost invariably those missives started out with “Dearest”, or “My Darling” or some other expression of affection. A curt, “Dear John” set the tone for a letter which was likely to contain news of a new love interest in the life of the girlfriend or wife.

88. Artistic theme MOTIF
A motif is a recurring element in an artistic work or design.

91. Surfing mecca OAHU
O’ahu has been called “The Gathering Place”, although the word “O’ahu” has no translation in Hawaiian. It seems that O’ahu is simply the name of the island. One story is that it is named after the son of the Polynesian navigator who first found the islands. The island is made up of two volcanoes, Wai’anae and Ko’olau, joined together by a broad valley, the O’ahu Plain.

97. Violinist Zimbalist EFREM
Efrem Zimbalist was a prominent concert violinist from Russia. Zimbalist was married to the famous American soprano Alma Gluck. The couple had a son called Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. who became a well-known actor (co-star of “77 Sunset Strip”). Zimbalist, Sr. was therefore also the grandfather of actress Stephanie Zimbalist (co-star of “Remington Steele”).

101. SpongeBob’s home SEABED
SpongeBob SquarePants is a cartoon character in a Nickelodeon television series. Spongebob first appeared in 1999, and he lives in a pineapple under the sea.

103. “Annabel Lee” poet, in some of his personal letters EA POE
“Annabel Lee” was the last complete poem written by Edgar Allan Poe. The opening lines are:

It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea.

106. Hot-and-sour alternative WONTON
A wonton is a dumpling used in Chinese cooking. Wontons are often boiled and served in a wonton soup.

107. Sweater pattern ARGYLE
The argyle pattern is based on the Campbell tartan. The Campbell clan is based in the Argyll region (note the spelling) in the west of Scotland, giving the Argyle pattern its name.

109. “Little House” lass LAURA
Laura Ingalls Wilder was an author from Pepin, Wisconsin who is best remembered for her “Little House” series of children’s novels. The series was based on her own childhood in a pioneer family that moved from Wisconsin to Kansas and back again.

112. Pixel pattern IMAGE
A pixel is a dot, the base element that goes to make up a digital image.

117. Peak of Greek myth OSSA
Mount Ossa in Greece is located between Mt. Pelion in the south, and the famed Mt. Olympus in the north. Mount Ossa is also known as Kissavos.

118. General __ chicken TSO’S
General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

121. His, to Henri SES
“Ses” is the French word for “his”, “her” or “its”, when referring to a group of items.

123. Many USMA grads LTS
West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn’t start until 1802. The first female cadets were admitted to West Point in 1976, and today about 15% of all new cadets are women.

124. Animal in a rut ELK
“Ruts” is the name given to the annually occurring periods of sexual excitement exhibited by some animals.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Chariot-riding god ARES
5. Athletic org. since 1894 USOC
9. They might be game FOWL
13. Monastery head ABBOT
18. Two-thumbs-up review RAVE
19. Obeyed a court order STOOD
21. Olympic sword EPEE
22. Hymn to Apollo, say PAEAN
23. Diet for ice cream lovers? A MONTH OF SUNDAES (sounds like “a month of Sundays”)
26. George who was the A.L. batting champ in three different decades BRETT
27. Like some lashes FALSE
28. Intro to physics? ASTRO-
29. Man cave focus HDTV
31. Ordinal extremes NTHS
32. Gently or quietly, e.g. ADVERB
34. Rubik’s creation CUBE
36. Annoy your bedmate SAW LOGS
38. __ Bo TAE
39. Farce set in a sandwich shop? RYE COMEDY (sounds like “wry comedy”)
43. Doggie bag goodie T-BONE
44. Like Simba REGAL
45. “In __ of gifts … ” LIEU
47. Previously, to Byron ERE NOW
50. Premier League soccer anchor Rebecca LOWE
53. Many a Mormon UTAHN
56. Inked on TV’s “Ink Master” TATTED
58. Juan’s first lady EVA
59. Israeli statesman Barak EHUD
60. Top for a beach cookout? MUSSEL SHIRT (sounds like “muscle shirt”)
62. Arrogant “South Park” kid ERIC
63. “Kinda” kin SORTA
65. Lover’s end? -PHILE
66. Frog haunts LILY PADS
68. Brownie accessory SASH
70. Put on __ A SHOW
73. Issue EMIT
74. Wayne Manor ringer BATPHONE
78. Impressionist’s forte APING
81. One of more than four billion ASIAN
84. __ wolf LONE
85. Cake recipe overhaul? TORTE REFORM (sounds like “tort reform”)
89. “The Addams Family” adjective OOKY
90. Down Under school UNI
91. Lima resident, maybe OHIOAN
92. Half a droid name DETOO
93. Tiny evidence samples DNAS
94. Ziggy Marley’s genre REGGAE
96. Fries, say SIDE
98. Off-the-wall OUTRE
100. Chorus of laughs HA-HAS
102. Thanksgiving week for a baker? LIFE OF PIE (sounds life “Life of Pi”)
105. Tex.-based carrier SWA
108. Layered pastry STRUDEL
110. Gillette razor word TRAC
111. Relative of A-flat major F MINOR
113. Word heard when pulling a string MAMA
114. “Find Your Own Road” sloganeer SAAB
116. Spaceship Earth setting EPCOT
119. In AMONG
120. Isn’t exactly humble BRAGS
122. Affair for dessert-loving bovines? BULL MOUSSE PARTY (sounds like “Bull Moose Party”)
125. What toadies do AGREE
126. Latin 101 word ERAT
127. It sets in Spain EL SOL
128. Rocky subj.? GEOL
129. Almonds, e.g. SEEDS
130. Little bits DABS
131. To-do list item TASK
132. Coastal fisher ERNE

Down
1. Longtime PLO chairman ARAFAT
2. Wyndham-owned brand RAMADA
3. Advance in the race? EVOLVE
4. Sixth __ SENSE
5. Show to a seat, in slang USH
6. Greek meeting site STOA
7. Gut reactions? OOFS
8. Sam’s competitor COSTCO
9. Janet Yellen’s org., with “The” FED
10. Large deep-water fish OPAH
11. Bed intruders WEEDS
12. Rice title vampire LESTAT
13. Call to cruisers, briefly APB
14. Without exception BAR NONE
15. Group that thrived during the borscht years? BEET GENERATION (sounds like “Beat Generation”)
16. Censor’s targets OATHS
17. Blasting supplies TNTS
20. Pasta wheat DURUM
24. Land in Paris? TERRE
25. Prize since 1901 NOBEL
30. Bug in a garage VW BEETLE
33. Quaint words of determination BY GUM
35. Fixes a draft EDITS
37. Byron, for one LORD
40. Flip over EAT UP
41. What opposite personalities often do CLASH
42. “Why not?!” YEAH!
44. Procedural impediment RED TAPE
46. Monthly exp. UTIL
48. “Amores” author OVID
49. MacArthur’s “best soldiers” WACS
50. Paul in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame LES
51. “The jig is up!” OHO!
52. Period of terror induced by a brat? WURST NIGHTMARE (sounds like “worst nightmare”)
54. Early Chinese dynasty HSIA
55. Dick Van Patten’s “Mama” role NELS
57. Pod opener? TRI-
61. Operettist Franz LEHAR
62. Season finale, e.g. EPISODE
64. Pipe remains ASH
67. Sumac from Peru YMA
69. Explosion sources HOTHEADS
71. Column with a slant OP-ED
72. Emilia, to Iago WIFE
74. Fuzzy memory BLUR
75. Second to none A-ONE
76. “There’s __ in … ” NO I
77. Love deity EROS
79. __ this world NOT OF
80. __ project GROUP
82. Letters for John Smith? AKA
83. Buffalo locale: Abbr. NYS
86. Dog, in a way TAIL
87. Send a Dear John letter END IT
88. Artistic theme MOTIF
91. Surfing mecca OAHU
95. Like privately owned classic cars GARAGED
97. Violinist Zimbalist EFREM
99. Update to reflect new routes REMAP
101. SpongeBob’s home SEABED
103. “Annabel Lee” poet, in some of his personal letters EA POE
104. Paranormal OCCULT
105. Annoying bedmate SNORER
106. Hot-and-sour alternative WONTON
107. Sweater pattern ARGYLE
108. Boot camp barker SARGE
109. “Little House” lass LAURA
112. Pixel pattern IMAGE
113. Degrees for CEOs MBAS
115. Tattle BLAB
117. Peak of Greek myth OSSA
118. General __ chicken TSO’S
121. His, to Henri SES
123. Many USMA grads LTS
124. Animal in a rut ELK

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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Oct 15, Sunday”

  1. Too much I'm unfamiliar about, so I couldn't progress the grid past about 1/4 and didn't have much time today to mess with looking up things (DNF). Until Monday, where I'm sure these grids will get much easier.

  2. I DON'T like puzzles that take TOO many liberties with obsure or even downright UNKNOWN to the rest of the world phrases and mottos. BEET generation was misleading enough but "flip over" with the answer being "eat up" Just went too far Even Bill didn't have an explanation for THAT!

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