LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 16, Tuesday




LA Times Crossword Solution 27 Sep 16







Constructed by: Lonnie Burton & Nadine Anderton

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: New World Order

Each of today’s themed answers contain a sequence of letters that are circled in the grid. These letters are W-O-R-L-D, but rearranged, in a NEW ORDER:

  • 38A…Post-Cold War hierarchy … and what is literally contained in the circled squares..NEW WORLD ORDER
  • 18A…Churchgoer’s “If it’s meant to be”..LORD WILLING
  • 26A…Another name for the gladiolus..SWORD LILY
  • 51A…Out-of-the-office assignment..FIELDWORK
  • 60A…They’re often passed on the road..SLOW DRIVERS

Bill’s time: 7m 20s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

4…Tropical fish with large peepers..BIGEYE

Bigeyes are tropical fish with rough, spined scales and unusually large eyes, hence the name.

15…Rapper whose professional name sounds like a candy..EMINEM

Rap star Eminem’s real name is Marshall Mathers, a native of Saint Joseph, Missouri. Mathers grew up poor, raised by a single-mom as the family was abandoned by his father when he was 18 months old. Marshall and his mother moved around the country before settling in a suburb of Detroit. He didn’t do well at school, and dropped out at the age of 17. But in the end he made it pretty big …

Forrest Mars, Sr. was the founder of the Mars Company. Forrest invented the Mars Bar while living over in England and then developed M&M’s when he returned to the US. Mars came up with the idea for M&M’s when he saw soldiers in the Spanish Civil War eating chocolate pellets. Those pellets had a hard shell of tempered chocolate on the outside to prevent them from melting. Mars got some of the funding to develop the M&M from William Murrie, the son of the president of Hershey’s Chocolate. It is the “M” and “M” from “Mars” and “Murrie” that give the name to the candy.

16…Sport, for ports: Abbr…ANAG

The word “sport” is an anagram of “ports”.

20…Explorer Ericson..LEIF

Leif Erikson was a Norse explorer and was the first European to land in North America, some 500 years before Christopher Columbus’s landing in 1492. The Norsemen named the area they discovered “Vinland”, which might translate as “Wine Land” or “Pasture Land”. Erikson built a small settlement called Leifsbudir, which archaeologists believe they have found in modern day Newfoundland, at L’Anse aux Meadows. The settlement discovered in Newfoundland is definitely Norse, but there is some dispute over whether it is actually Erikson’s Leifsbudir.

22…Kitchy-__..KOO

“Kitchy-kitchy-koo” is a taunt uttered while tickling someone.

23…Blame taker..GOAT

A “scapegoat” is a person chosen to take the blame in place of others. The term comes from the Bible’s Book of Leviticus, which describes a goat that was cast into the desert along with the sins of the community.

24…Curtain material..SCRIM

“Scrim” is the name given to that transparent fabric that hangs down onto a theater’s stage, often used with special lighting for various effects.

26…Another name for the gladiolus..SWORD LILY

The gladiolus is a perennial flower in the iris family, and is sometimes called the Sword Lily.

30…Cable box display..TEEVEE

I guess a display in the front of a cable box might read “TEEVEE”.

Television (TV, teevee, the tube, the boob tube)

32…Dispensable candy..PEZ

PEZ is an Austrian brand name for a particular candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. Famously, PEZ dispensers have molded “heads”, and have become very collectible over the years. The list of heads includes historical figures like Betsy Ross and Paul Revere, characters from “Star Wars” and “Star Trek”, and even British royalty like the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (“William and Kate”). The name PEZ comes from the first, middle and last letters of “Pfefferminz”, the German word for “peppermint”.

34…Geological epoch in which mammals arose..EOCENE

The Eocene Epoch lasted from 56 to 34 million years ago, and is noted for the emergence of the first mammals on the planet.

42…Mortar carriers..HODS

A hod is a 3-sided box on the the end of a long handle used for carrying bricks (and sometimes mortar) at a construction site, usually up and down ladders.

43…__ Fables..AESOP’S

Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

44…Nonprofit URL ending..ORG

The .org domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified.

47…Muscat residents..OMANIS

Muscat is the capital of Oman, and lies on the northeast coast of the state on the Gulf of Oman, a branch of the Persian Gulf.

56…Peau de __: satin-weave cloth..SOIE

“Paduasoy” is a satin-weave silk fabric with a dull finish. The material is sometimes known by its French name “peau de soie”, which translates as “skin of silk”.

66…Austrian capital..VIENNA

Vienna is the capital of Austria. Vienna has a long musical tradition and was home to Franz Schubert, Johann Strauss (I and II), Josef Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and Gustav Mahler. As such, Vienna is sometimes called the “City of Music”. It is also called the “City of Dreams” as it was home to the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.

67…”__ Misérables”..LES

Victor Hugo’s famous 1862 novel “Les Misérables”, has been translated into English several times. However, the title is usually left in the original French as a successful translation of “les misérables” seems to be elusive. Some suggestions for an English title are “The Wretched”, “The Victims” and “The Dispossessed”. The novel follows the lives of several characters including an ex-convict Jean Valjean, a fanatic police inspector Javert, a beautiful prostitute Fantine, and Fantine’s illegitimate daughter Cosette.

68…Chris of “The Good Wife”..NOTH

The actor Chris Noth is best known for his television roles. Noth played Detective Mike Logan on “Law & Order” and Big on “Sex and the City”. More recently, he played the “bad husband” on the excellent show “The Good Wife”.

69…First female Shuttle pilot __ Collins..EILEEN

Eileen Collins was the first female pilot of a Space Shuttle, and the first female commander of a Space Shuttle mission. She was also the first astronaut to fly the shuttle through the 360-degree, rendezvous pitch maneuver. This maneuver became routine for Shuttles in docking with the International Space Station. The idea is for the spacecraft to perform a backflip so that the crew of the Space Station can photograph the Shuttle’s heat-shield to verify integrity prior to reentry.

70…H.S. 12th-graders..SRS

Senior (sr.)

Down

1…NYSE locale..WALL ST

New York’s famous “Wall Street” was originally named by the Dutch as “de Waal Straat”.

The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement. Today, the NYSE is located in National Historic Landmark building with the address 11 Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

4…Brussels’ land: Abbr…BEL

Belgium is one of the six founding members of the European Economic Community (EEC) that evolved into today’s European Union (EU). Belgium also acts as host of several international organizations, including NATO. There are two large regions in the country. Flanders in the north is predominantly Dutch-speaking, and Wallonia in the south is predominantly French-speaking. The capital city of Brussels is officially bilingual, although from personal experience I can attest that it is mainly French-speaking even though it is located in the Flemish part of the country.

6…Copter predecessors..GIROS

“Giro” is a reference to the autogyro, an aircraft that uses an unpowered rotor to create lift, and a powered propeller to provide thrust. The first autogyro was flown in 1923 in Spain, where it was invented.

8…Evergreen that’s a homophone of a vowel..YEW

“Yew” sounds like the letter U.

The family of trees known as yews propagate by producing a seed surrounded by soft, sweet and brightly colored aril. Birds eat the fruit and then disperse the seed in their droppings. The birds leave the seed undamaged, and so are unharmed by the potent poisons taxine and taxol that are found within the seed. The seeds are highly toxic to humans.

10…Judaism : kosher :: Islam : __..HALAL

“Halal” is a term for an action or object that is permissible under Islamic Law. In particular “halal” is used to describe food that can be consumed. Anything that is not allowed is called “haraam”.

According to Jewish dietary law, “kosher” food is fit to eat, and food that is not fit to eat is referred to as “treif” (or tref).

12…Took part in a marathon..RAN

The marathon commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens, and is run over 26 miles and 385 yards,. The actual distance run today was decided in 1921, and matches the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway.

19…City southwest of Warsaw..LODZ

The Polish city of Lodz is located about 85 southwest of Warsaw and is the third-largest city in the country. “Lodz” is a Polish word meaning “boat”, and both the city’s flag and coat of arms feature wooden boat and an oar. Lodz’s motto is “Ex navicula navis”, which translates from Latin as “From a boat, a ship”.

21…Reporter’s quintet of questions..FIVE WS

The Five Ws (or “Five Ws and one H”) is a journalistic concept used for gathering information. For a story to be complete, six questions need to be answered:

  1. Who is it about?
  2. What happened?
  3. Where did it take place?
  4. When did it take place?
  5. Why did it happen?
  6. How did it happen?

25…Ask for Whiskas, perhaps..MEOW

The brand name “Whiskas” has been used for the cat food since 1988, but the product itself has been made in McLean, Virginia since 1936. Whiskas was originally sold under the name “Kal Kan”.

27…Opinion columns..OP-EDS

Op-Ed is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-Eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

35…Muse of poetry..ERATO

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry and is often depicted playing a lyre.

36…Marlins’ MLB div…NLE

National League East (NLE)

The Miami Marlins baseball team started out life in 1993 as the Florida Marlins. The franchise changed its name to the Miami Marlins in 2011 when it relocated to the newly constructed Marlins Park.

40…Valentine card hugs..OOO

In the sequence XOX, the X represents a kiss, and the O a hug. OOO is a string of hugs, and XXX a string of kisses. Hugs and kisses …

Saint Valentine’s Day was introduced by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saint’s’ day was dropped by the Roman Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

41…LP measures..RPMS

Revolutions per minute (RPM)

The first vinyl records designed to play at 33 1/3 rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

42…Baseball inst. in Cooperstown..HOF

The first Hall of Fame (HOF) established in the US was the Hall of Fame for Great Americans, an outdoor sculptor gallery located in the grounds of Bronx Community College in New York City. Completed in 1900, it is an open-air colonnade featuring the bronze busts of renowned Americans such as President George Washington, author Henry David Thoreau, musician John Philip Sousa and baseball legend Jackie Robinson. The Hall of Fame of Great Americans was inspired by the Ruhmeshalle (“Hall of Fame” in German) located in Munich, Germany that exhibits busts of important people from Bavaria.

Cooperstown is a village in New York that is famous as the home to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The village was named for Judge William Cooper, Cooperstown’s founder, and the father of the noted writer James Fenimore Cooper.

48…Orange choices..NAVELS

Navel oranges are the ones with the small second fruit that grows at the base, at the “navel”. The navel orange has been traced back to a single mutation that took place in an orange tree in Brazil many years ago. The mutation also rendered the fruit seedless and hence sterile, so it is propagated using grafts.

52…Acid test outcome, possibly..LOW PH

As we all recall from chemistry class, a pH of 7 is considered neutral. Anything less than 7 is an acid, and anything above 7 is a base.

54…Nancy Drew creator Carolyn..KEENE

The “Nancy Drew” mystery stories were produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate. The founder of the Syndicate hired a team of writers to produce the “Nancy Drew” novels, but listed the author of each book as the fictional Carolyn Keene.

58…White-tailed coastal bird..ERNE

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also called the white-tailed eagle, and the sea-eagle.

60…Nine-digit ID..SSN

A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSN’s are assigned randomly.

61…Lav, in Bath..LOO

It has been suggested that the British term “loo” comes from Waterloo (water-closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo” in which the pot was called the loo!

Our word lavatory (sometimes “lav”) originally referred to a washbasin, and comes from the Latin “lavatorium”, a place for washing. In the 1600s a “lavatory” came to mean a washroom, and in the 1920s a toilet.

Bath is a beautiful city in South West England of which I have very fond memories. Bath is an old Roman spa town, and the city’s name comes from the Roman baths that have been excavated and restored.

63…__ Antonio..SAN

The city of San Antonio was named by Spanish explorers who came up a Native American settlement in the area on 13 June 1631, the feast day of St. Anthony of Padua.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Civil __..WAR

4…Tropical fish with large peepers..BIGEYE

10…Add to the staff..HIRE

14…Jungle swinger..APE

15…Rapper whose professional name sounds like a candy..EMINEM

16…Sport, for ports: Abbr…ANAG

17…Kindled..LIT

18…Churchgoer’s “If it’s meant to be”..LORD WILLING

20…Explorer Ericson..LEIF

22…Kitchy-__..KOO

23…Blame taker..GOAT

24…Curtain material..SCRIM

26…Another name for the gladiolus..SWORD LILY

30…Cable box display..TEEVEE

32…Dispensable candy..PEZ

33…High bond rating..AAA

34…Geological epoch in which mammals arose..EOCENE

37…Leave __: reward the waiter..A TIP

38…Post-Cold War hierarchy … and what is literally contained in the circled squares..NEW WORLD ORDER

42…Mortar carriers..HODS

43…__ Fables..AESOP’S

44…Nonprofit URL ending..ORG

45…Adherent’s suffix..-IST

47…Muscat residents..OMANIS

51…Out-of-the-office assignment..FIELDWORK

55…Point of view..SLANT

56…Peau de __: satin-weave cloth..SOIE

57…Wide shoe width..EEE

59…In any way..EVER

60…They’re often passed on the road..SLOW DRIVERS

64…Holiday threshold..EVE

65…Starting course..SOUP

66…Austrian capital..VIENNA

67…”__ Misérables”..LES

68…Chris of “The Good Wife”..NOTH

69…First female Shuttle pilot __ Collins..EILEEN

70…H.S. 12th-graders..SRS

Down

1…NYSE locale..WALL ST

2…Per unit..APIECE

3…Head to bed..RETIRE

4…Brussels’ land: Abbr…BEL

5…”Don’t worry about me”..I’M OK

6…Copter predecessors..GIROS

7…Provide with funding..ENDOW

8…Evergreen that’s a homophone of a vowel..YEW

9…Political refugee..EMIGRE

10…Judaism : kosher :: Islam : __..HALAL

11…Start..INITIATE

12…Took part in a marathon..RAN

13…Cake mix need..EGG

19…City southwest of Warsaw..LODZ

21…Reporter’s quintet of questions..FIVE WS

25…Ask for Whiskas, perhaps..MEOW

27…Opinion columns..OP-EDS

28…Lion’s den..LAIR

29…Jabber..YAP

31…Prefix with friendly..ECO-

35…Muse of poetry..ERATO

36…Marlins’ MLB div…NLE

37…Source of media revenue..AD SALE

38…”Me neither”..NOR I

39…Barely beats..EDGES OUT

40…Valentine card hugs..OOO

41…LP measures..RPMS

42…Baseball inst. in Cooperstown..HOF

45…”__ it my way”..I DID

46…Turn sharply..SWERVE

48…Orange choices..NAVELS

49…”Well, __!”: “What an outrage!”..I NEVER

50…Blood pressure elevator..STRESS

52…Acid test outcome, possibly..LOW PH

53…Party hearty..REVEL

54…Nancy Drew creator Carolyn..KEENE

58…White-tailed coastal bird..ERNE

60…Nine-digit ID..SSN

61…Lav, in Bath..LOO

62…Three on a sundial..III

63…__ Antonio..SAN

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16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 16, Tuesday”

  1. Better get off to Clifton Park on yesterday’s advice!

    (I haven’t figured out how to add to my comment after I hit Post.)

  2. @David (yesterday)
    Clues are common enough that they repeat themselves at times. This is even more true if you look into the database services that are offered crossword constructors. If a setter tows to them enough, there’s bound to be a certain repetitive nature to things.

    But if it helps, the better typical “cheating” sites will actually track clue usages. For instance, you can put the clues of that grid into this one and see every puzzle they ever scanned where that precise clue appears. While not exhaustive, it seems pretty comprehensive.

    My checking, especially of the theme clues, reveals it to be a unique puzzle. Though, there is the other issue of constructors inevitably repeating themselves. Nancy Cole Stuart is a highly suspected Mike Shenk alias (books are published yes, but NCS is WSJ-exclusive, so hard to not shake that feeling), the theme is a bit pedestrian (for a Monday, what do you expect?) and given the number of grids he’s done, it’s probably not hard to notice consistencies.

    Have a nice day, all!

  3. 9:43, no errors, iPad. An easy Tuesday. For me, the only entries that weren’t gimmes or near-gimmes were Chris NOTH and EILEEN Collins, but I was slowed down by inept one-finger typing and by being a little tired from watching last night’s slugfest on TV (excuse me, make that “political debate on TEEVEE”) and then having trouble sleeping …

    @Glenn … Thanks for the response. I’m used to seeing the same clues over and over and the same entries over and over, but that particular WSJ puzzle seemed familiar from start to finish. I actually filled in some entries before reading the clues for them. Definitely a very odd déjà vu experience. Despite my years of working crossword puzzles, I am woefully ignorant of all but a few names of crossword setters and editors and I know next to nothing about the online databases and tools that are now available. So … thanks again … much appreciated …

  4. Nice challenge by Tuesday standards. The theme came quickly and so did the rest of the puzzle. The dreaded ANAGram clue almost fooled me again. Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice shame on me. What’s the saying for “a few dozen times”..?

    A few new things here for me – e.g. SCRIM and SOIE. I’d also like to visit Wine Land….

    Had to bite my tongue on TEEVEE and KOO. Ouch.

    I like that we had AAA, EEE, III, OOO as answers. I guess YEW stood in for UUU…

    Best –

  5. This was an easy and enjoyable Tues.. probably because I wasn’t asked to know who hit back to back no hitters, and I’m familiar w/ Nancy Drew and the french for silk.
    I also noticed the triple a-e-i-o’s.
    I’m been gone a lot lately-is it just me, or is Vidwan missing? Still travelling?
    Have a good week, everyone-

  6. Well, ANAG got ME.
    Never noticed the AEIO YEW.
    Filled in OOs and never looked at that crossing sMANIS.
    Sheesh, I should have slept longer.
    Never heard of BIGEYE.
    FIVE WS stumped me for awhile.
    TEEVEE? Ugh.

  7. I resisted GIROS since in my experience it has always been Gyro-copters that fly with an unpowered rotor. Since I was sure that the singer was not “emynem” I finally made it fit. Also the ANAG clue was a sneaky one that I thought was wrong even though it fit. 🙂

  8. Just a “fun fact” that I noticed. 17 Across clue “Kindled” for which the answer was “lit” could also work for the E book reader. “Lit” being short for “literature” after all! ;-D>

  9. I take issue with the use of clues that contain part of the answer. For example, Opinion columns = opeds (op stands for opinion) and Marlins’ MLB div. = NLE (L stands for league on both the clue and the answer).

  10. I am a beginner, basically, but I thought Tuesday’s puzzle was very tough. Scrim…really and teevee….anag…bigeye what???
    Love trying L.A.Times puzzles!!

  11. Hello Bella, thanks for remembering me – I’m baack – for better or for ‘verse’. A shortish trip to the near-far-east, and have officially spent 34 or 35 hours in a day – today. ( I’m not even sure thats possible, but if you wake up at 1 am and travel with the sun, I believe you can do it. The main pertinent question is … why would you even want to …). Does that mean I spend a 12 hour day tomorrow ? More likely it was a 12 hour day, yesterday ? Maybe we need Jeff or Lewis Caroll to make sense of all this. Where do the extra 12 hours end up >

    I did the Monday and the Tuesday puzzle – today’s being a lil difficlut but still very enjoyable.

    New words and/or concepts today – Hod carriers ( 3 sided ‘forms’ ) and that Navel Oranges have a ‘second’ fruit’ at the bottom of the orange. I have often noticed this, but never thought too much about this. Next time I eat a navel orange, I will remember Bill’s blog.

    Have a nice day, all – while I hie to complete my ‘shorteneed ‘ day tomorrow.

  12. Agree on several previous comments, especially neat – the AAA, EEE, III, OOO !!! “EVE” appears horizontally & vertically, but not quite diagonally. I’m curious about the vague – sort of tie-in – of one or two clues/answers between the NYT & LA TIMES X-word puzzles, sometimes on the same day, sometimes one day removed. More on that in the future!

  13. Hi all!
    @Brian, welcome!!
    @Vidwan, welcome BACK– I’ll take those extra 12 hours off your hands!
    @Karen, I agree re: answer parts in the clues. Good call on both of those.

    So, I expected I’d find you all taking this setter to task for AAA, EEE, III, & OOO!! Instead, it’s looking like a mini-theme to me now. Cute.
    Pretty good puzzle. I also had OOS, but changed it to get OMANIS, not that I knew what THOSE are. Overall, a nice challenge.
    We’re finally getting cooler weather in LA for Wednesday… it’ll be mid-80s.
    Sweet dreams~~™?

  14. I concur with a few previous comments, especially neat — AAA, EEE, III, OOO, then a stab with YEW !!!
    Notice how “EVE” appears several times: horizontally & vertically, but not quite diagonally. [ i.e. –, |, not / ]
    ( I’ll get this COMMENT / EDIT timing thing down, soon. Bare, oops; beer, oops; bear with me.)

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