LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Sep 16, Sunday




LA Times Crossword Solution 4 Sep 16







Constructed by: Mark McClain

Edited by: Rich Norris

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Theme: Fitting Jobs

Today’s themed answers are JOBS that seem FITTING given a person’s name, or the sound of a person’s name:

  • 25A…Fitting job for Will?..PROBATE JUDGE
  • 46A…Fitting job for Stu?..HASH HOUSE COOK
  • 67A…Fitting job for Sue?..TRIAL ATTORNEY
  • 90A…Fitting job for Roger?..RADIO OPERATOR
  • 113A…Fitting job for Bette?..CASINO DEALER
  • 3D…Fitting job for Art?..MUSEUM GUIDE
  • 70D…Fitting job for Miles?..TRUCK DRIVER

Bill’s time: 10m 40s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1…Places for reps..GYMS

Our word “gymnasium” comes from the Greek “gymnasion” meaning “public place where exercise is taken”. The Greek term comes from “gymnos” meaning “naked”, as that physical training was usually done unclothed.

5…Texter’s “Mercy me!”..OMG

OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

8…National park near Bar Harbor..ACADIA

Acadia National Park in Maine was created in 1919, although back then it was called Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette who famously supported the American Revolution. The park was renamed to Acadia in 1929.

Bar Harbor is a town on the Maine coast that is a popular place to visit in the summer. Cruise ships are a common sight in the harbor from May through October.

18…Été month..AOUT

In French, “août” (August) is a month in “l’été” (the summer). Note that the names of months are not capitalized in French.

24…Some urban commuter lines..ELS

Elevated railroad (El)

25…Fitting job for Will?..PROBATE JUDGE

“Probate” is the process of establishing the validity of a will. The term derives from the Latin “probare” meaning “to prove”.

32…Strange craft..UFOS

Unidentified flying object (UFO)

33…2001 Audrey Tautou title role..AMELIE

“Amélie” is a 2001 French film, a romantic comedy about a shy waitress in Montmartre, Paris played by Audrey Tautou (who also played the female lead in “The Da Vinci Code”). The movie was originally released under the French title, “Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain” (“The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain”).

35…Warble..TRILL

In music a “trill” is the rapid alternation of two tones that are very close to each other to make a vibrato sound.

36…White-coated critter..ERMINE

The stoat has dark brown fur in the summer, and white fur in the winter. Sometimes the term “ermine” is used for the animal during the winter when the fur is white. Ermine skins have long been prized by royalty and are often used for white trim on ceremonial robes.

39…Value of a Benjamin..ONE-C

Benjamin Franklin is featured on one side of the hundred-dollar bill, hence the nickname “Benjamin”. Philadelphia’s Independence Hall is featured on the other side. There is a famous “error” in the image of Independence Hall. If you look closely at the clock face at the top of the building you can see that the “four” is written in Roman numerals as “IV” as perhaps one might expect. However, on the actual clock on Independence Hall, the “four” is denoted by “IIII”.

40…”Sesame Street” network..PBS

Back in 1966, the Carnegie Institute allocated money to study the use of television to help young children prepare for school. The institute gave an $8million grant to set up the Children’s Television Workshop with the task of creating an educational TV program for young people. The program began to come together, especially after Jim Henson (of Muppet fame) got involved. The name “Sesame Street” was chosen simply because it was the “least disliked” of all names proposed just before the program went on the air.

43…Greyhound, e.g…DOG

Greyhound dogs were originally bred for coursing game, and today are bred for greyhound racing. Coursing is the pursuit of game by sight, rather than scent. As such, coursing dogs like greyhounds are often referred to as “sighthounds”.

44…Hasselblad product..SLR

Hasselblad is a manufacturer of medium-format cameras, headquartered in Gothenburg, Sweden. Famously, Hasselblads were used almost exclusively to take still photographs during the first moon landings.

46…Fitting job for Stu?..HASH HOUSE COOK

… because “Stu” sounds like “stew”.

“Hash house” is a slang term for a cheap restaurant.

49…”Parlez-__ français?”..VOUS

In French, “Parlez-vous français?” means “Do you speak French?”

51…Whitman’s dooryard bloomers..LILACS

Walt Whitman wrote his famous poem “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” as an elegy following the violent death of President Lincoln.

55…Fennel-like herb..ANISE

The essential oil in the anise plant is anethole. Anethole has a licorice-like flavor, and is used extensively in cooking.

Fennel is a hardy perennial plant species in the celery family that is used as a herb. It also goes by the name “sweet anise”. Personally, I can’t stand the stuff …

59…Sign of life..PULSE

One’s “pulse” is the rhythmic throbbing of arteries that is usually detected at the wrist or the neck. The contraction of the heart creates a pressure wave in the blood that moves the arterial walls, which is detected as the pulse.

70…Fed. power agcy…TVA

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has to be one of America’s great success stories when it comes to economic development. Created in 1933, the TVA spearheaded economic development in the Tennessee Valley at the height of the Great Depression. Central to the success was the federally-funded construction of flood-control and electricity-generation facilities.

74…Gothic cathedral feature..ARCH

Gothic architecture is a style that dates back to the mid and late medieval period, following on from the Romanesque style. Gothic architecture originated in France in the 12th century, and was prevalent until the 16th century, when it was largely superseded by the Renaissance style. Gothic buildings often feature pointed arches, ribbed vaults and flying buttresses. The best known example of Gothic edifices are magnificent cathedrals and abbeys across Europe, many of which are still used today. Examples of the style can be seen in Notre Dame de Paris in France, Westminster Abbey in England, and Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin.

75…Not for the masses..ESOTERIC

Something described as “esoteric” is meant only for a select few with special knowledge. The term comes from the Greek “esoterikos” meaning “belonging to an inner circle”.

77…Long accounts..SAGAS

“Saga” is an Old Norse word for a long and elaborate story, and a word that we’ve been using in English only since the early 1700s.

80…Tournament pass..BYE

The word “bye”, as used in sport, originated in cricket. A bye is a run scored due to an error by the wicketkeeper (similar to a catcher in baseball) when he fails to stop a ball bowled by the bowler (like a pitcher in baseball). Later the word “bye” in sport came to mean the position of a player in a tournament who is left without a competitor when the rest have drawn pairs. In these commercial times, those byes tend to be awarded to the best (seeded) players, so that the most popular players always advance past the first round of competition.

81…Seesaw sitter of song..ESAU

I saw Esau, he saw me.
I saw Esau, sitting on a see-saw,
I saw Esau, he saw me.
I saw Esau, he saw me, and she saw I saw Esau.
How many S’s in that?

87…Inveterate critic..SNIPER

“To snipe” is to attack with snide criticism, especially from a safe distance. This usage of the term is an extension of the older meaning, to take a shot from a hidden position (as in “sniper”). Such a shot was originally taken when hunting the game birds called “snipes”.

89…Entom. and geol…SCIS

Entomology (entom.) and geology (geol.) are sciences (scis.)

Entomology is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of insects. The etymology of entomology (!) is the Greek “entomon” (meaning “insect”) and “logia” (meaning “study of”). In turn, the Greek word for insect, “entomos”, literally means “having a notch or cut”, in deference to the observation by Aristotle that insects have segmented bodies.

90…Fitting job for Roger?..RADIO OPERATOR

The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included “Roger” to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

95…Colorful pond fish..KOI

Koi are also called Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

102…Eponymous chair maker..EAMES

Charles and Ray Eames were a husband-wife team of furniture designers. One of the more famous of their designs is the Eames lounge chair that comes with an ottoman. This trendy piece of furniture featured in a late episode of the television show “Frasier”. In the show, Frasier’s Dad remarks that the Eames chair is so comfortable that he might have gotten rid of his tatty old recliner a long time ago.

104…University lecturer..DOCENT

Docent is a term used for university lecturer. There are also museum docents, people who serve as guides for visitors to their institutions, usually providing their services for free. The term comes from the Latin “docere” meaning “to teach”.

105…Dallas Cowboys logo..STAR

The Dallas Cowboys play in the National Football Conference of the NFL. The Cowboys are famous for a lengthy streak of 20 consecutive winning seasons, from 1966 to 1985. They are the highest-valued sports franchise in the country. The only team in the world that’s worth more money is the UK’s Manchester United soccer team.

106…One with a flat to fix, maybe..LESSOR

“Flat” is a word more commonly used in the British Isles than here, in the sense of an apartment or condominium. The word “flat” is Scottish in origin, in which language it meant a “floor in a house”.

108…Body art, slangily..INK

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

118…English : John :: Slavic : __..IVAN

The name “John” translates into Scottish as “Ian”, into Russian as “Ivan”, and into Irish as “Seán”.

120…Ill-tempered..ORNERY

Back in the early 1800s, the word “ornery” was an informal contraction for the word “ordinary”, and meant commonplace, but with a sense of “poor quality, coarse, ugly” as opposed to “special”. Towards the end of the century, the usage “ornery” had evolved into describing someone who was mean or cantankerous.

121…Keebler spokesman..ELF

The famous Keebler Elves have been appearing in ads for Keebler since 1968. The original head of the elves was J. J. Keebler, but he was toppled from power by Ernest J. Keebler in 1970.

122…Peter on piano..NERO

Peter Nero is a pianist and conductor of “pops” orchestral concerts. Nero had a huge hit in the pop music charts in 1971 with the theme tune from the movie “Summer of ’42”.

123…Phishing targets: Abbr…SSNS

Phishing is the name given to the online practice of stealing usernames, passwords and credit card details by creating a site that deceptively looks reliable and trustworthy. Phishers often send out safe-looking emails or instant messages that direct someone to an equally safe-looking website where the person might inadvertently enter sensitive information. “Phishing” is a play on the word “fishing”, as in “fishing for passwords, PIN numbers etc.”

124…Hockey rink area..CREASE

The marked off area in front of the goal in (ice) hockey is called the crease. Within the crease, the goaltender is allowed to do his or her duties without interference from other players. There’s some “breathing space”.

125…Rapper Mos __..DEF

Mos Def is the former stage name of actor and rapper Dante Terrell Smith-Bay, now known as Yasiin Bey. Mos Def is one of the few rap stars who is really making a name for himself in the world of movies. He received critical acclaim for roles in 2003’s “The Italian Job” , 2005’s “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”, and for a featured role in an episode of television’s “House”.

Down

1…Williams title role..GARP

John Irving’s 1978 novel “The World According to Garp” is somewhat biographical. In fact, Irving’s mother found parts of the novel difficult to read, recognizing elements of herself in Garp’s mother, Jenny Fields.

2…The Isley Brothers’ “It’s __ Thing”..YOUR

The Isley Brothers are an R&B group from Cincinnati, Ohio. The original lineup was a vocal trio consisting of three brothers: O’Kelly, Jr., Rudolph and Ronald Isley. The three brothers wrote the fabulous 1959 hit “Shout”, the song which brought the group its first success.

4…She kept Martina from winning a seventh straight Wimbledon in 1988..STEFFI

Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, more than any other man or woman other than Margaret Court. She is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

Martina Navratilova is a retired tennis player who is thought by many to have been the greatest player of all time. Navratilova won the Wimbledon singles title a record nine times, which is one of many records that she holds. She was born in Czechoslovakia but asked for political asylum in the US in 1975 at 18 years of age. Navratilova was granted temporary residency in the US and as a result was stripped of her Czech citizenship. That Czech citizenship was restored in 2008, making her a dual citizen.

6…Thickness units..MILS

The thickness unit known as a “mil” here in the US is usually referred to as a “thou” on the other side of the Atlantic. A “mil” is actually one thousandth of an inch. I vote for “thou” …

7…It’s paid at pumps..GAS TAX

We pay about 50 cents a gallon in federal and state taxes of gasoline. I’ve always considered ourselves very lucky as to me this a low tax rate as we pay about $3.50 a US gallon in taxes in Ireland. Yep, $3.50 a gallon in tax alone …

11…Paso __: two-step dance..DOBLE

The lively and dramatic dance called the paso doble (Spanish for “double-step”) is very much associated with the Spanish bullfight, but in fact it originated in southern France, where bullfighting is also legal. The dance is based on music that is played at bullfights when the bullfighters enter the arena, and when they close in for the kill. Not a big fan of bullfighting …

12…George’s lyricist..IRA

Ira Gershwin was the lyricist who worked with his brother George to create such American classics as the songs “I Got Rhythm” and “Someone to Watch Over Me”, as well as the opera “Porgy and Bess”. After George Gershwin died, Ira continued to create great music, working with the likes of Jerome Kern and Kurt Weill.

13…Puerto Rico hrs…AST

Atlantic Standard Time (AST) is four hours behind Greenwich Mean Time and one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. The list of locations that use AST includes Puerto Rico, Bermuda and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

14…”O Come, O Come Emmanuel” verb..REJOICE

“O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” is a Christian hymn that is mainly sung during Advent, the season just prior to Christmas. The hymn’s title is a translation of the original Latin “Veni, Veni, Emmanuel”.

O come, O come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel,
That mourns in lonely exile here,
Until the Son of God appear.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

17…Ticker tapes, for short?..ECGS

An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

“Ticker” is a slang term for “heart”.

22…Vietnamese holiday..TET

The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning “Feast of the First Morning”, with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

26…Barnum “attraction”..EGRESS

Barnum’s American Museum opened in New York City in 1841, and sadly burned to the ground in 1865. The attractions in the museum included zoo animals, waxworks as well as theater shows and “freak shows”. Famously, a sign pointing to the exit of the museum read “This Way to the Egress”. Many visitors followed the sign, anxious to see the “egress” exhibit, and ended up out on the street!

29…Plains people..OMAHAS

The Omaha Nation was one of the most welcoming of the Native American tribes, never resisting the influx of European explorers and traders. The Omaha even fought alongside Union troops during the American Civil War, and have stood by the US people ever since. Regardless, the Omaha people lost most of their land and now reside on the Omaha Reservation in northeastern Nebraska and western Iowa.

35…Flanged fastener..T-NUT

A T-nut is so called because it has a t-shape when viewed from the side.

36…Composer Grieg..EDVARD

Edvard Grieg is Norway’s best known composer, active in the Romantic Era. Grieg’s most famous works are the gorgeous “Piano Concerto in A minor:”, and his incidental music for the play “Peer Gynt” by Henrik Ibsen.

37…TV pundit who wrote “Years of Minutes”..ROONEY

“Years of Minutes” is a 2003 collection of television essays written by Andy Rooney for “60 Minutes”.

Andy Rooney began his career in newspapers during WWII working for “Stars and Stripes” in London. He had some memorable experiences during the war, including flying on the first American bombing raid over Germany. He was also one of the first American journalists to visit the German concentration camps as they were liberated. He started his segment called “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney” on CBS’s “60 Minutes” way back in 1978, and so was on our screens for over 40 years. Rooney passed away in 2011.

42…Scottish isle..SKYE

The Isle of Skye is off the northwest coast of Scotland in the Inner Hebrides. It is the second largest island in the country, and has been linked to the mainland by a road bridge since 1995. I’ve never been there, but I hear the views are spectacular.

48…French vineyards..CRUS

“Cru” is a term used in the French wine industry that means “growth place”. So, “cru” is the name of the location where the grapes are grown, as opposed to the name of a specific vineyard. The terms “premier cru” and “grand cru” are also used, but the usage depends on the specific wine region. Generally it is a classification awarded to specific vineyards denoting their potential for producing great wines. “Grand cru” is reserved for the very best vineyards, with “premier cru” the level just below.

52…Olin of “Chocolat”..LENA

The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin’s breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

The movie “Chocolat” released in 2000 is a big screen adaption of the novel of the same name by Joanne Harris. “Chocolat” tells the story of a young mother with a six-year-old daughter who opens up a chocolate shop in a French village. The mother is played by the talented Juliette Binoche.

56…__ Park, Colorado..ESTES

Estes Park is a town in a beautiful part of the US, in northern Colorado. Estes Park is home to the headquarters of Rocky Mountain National Park.

63…Needing no Rx..OTC

Over-the-counter drugs (OTC) don’t need a prescription (Rx).

65…Early 20th-century car..REO

The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom Eli Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

71…TV component?..VISION

Television (TV)

73…Scandinavian natives..SAMI

Lapland is a geographic region in northern Scandinavia, largely found within the Arctic Circle. Parts of Lapland are in Norway, Sweden and Finland. The people who are native to the region are called the Sami people. The Sami don’t like to be referred to as “Lapps” and they regard the term as insulting.

76…Scruffy couple?..EFS

There are a couple of letters F (efs) in the word “scruffy”.

77…First name in desserts..SARA

In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

79…Nike and Demeter..GODDESSES

Nike was the Greek goddess of victory, often referred to as the Winged Goddess of Victory. The athletic shoe company Nike uses the “Nike swoosh” as its logo, which is based on the goddess’s wing.

In Greek mythology, Demeter is the goddess of the harvest. Her Roman equivalent is Ceres.

82…”Odyssey” threats..SIRENS

In Greek mythology, the Sirens were seductive bird-women who lured men to their deaths with their song. When Odysseus sailed closed to the island home of the Sirens he wanted to hear their voices, but in safety. He had his men plug their ears with beeswax and then ordered them to tie him to the mast and not to free him until they were safe. On hearing their song Odysseus begged to be let loose, but the sailors just tightened his bonds and and the whole crew sailed away unharmed.

85…Ravel classic..BOLERO

Maurice Ravel was a great French composer of the Romantic Era. His most famous piece of music by far is his “Bolero”, the success of which he found somewhat irksome as he thought it to be a trivial work. Personally though, I love the minimalism and simplicity …

86…Tarzan’s foster family..APES

“Tarzan” is the title character in the series of books created by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The line “Me Tarzan, you Jane” never appeared in the books, and indeed doesn’t even figure in the movies. Apparently Johnny Weissmuller (who played Tarzan in the thirties and forties) saw Maureen O’Sullivan (“Jane”, to Weissmuller’s “Tarzan”) struggling with a suitcase in the parking lot during filming. He grabbed the bag from her, jokingly saying “Me Tarzan, you Jane”, and people have been quoting those words ever since.

91…1970 self-titled pop album..OSMONDS

The Osmond Brothers were performing at Disneyland in the early sixties when they were spotted by Andy Williams’ father. He was so impressed by their performance that he told Andy to book them on his TV show, after which they became regulars from 1962-69.

92…”Anne of Green Gables” town..AVONLEA

“Anne of Green Gables” is a 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery that she set in the fictional Prince Edward Island community of Avonlea. Montgomery wrote several sequels to “Anne”, with them all being set on Prince Edward Island (PEI), from where the author hailed.

103…Like most people..ASIAN

Most of the world’s population lives in Asia (60%), and Asia is the largest continent in terms of landmass (30% of the world). Asia also has the highest population density (246 people per square mile), and the most populous city on the continent is Shanghai, China.

104…Veteran telejournalist Sawyer..DIANE

Diane Sawyer was the anchor of the news program “ABC World News” from 2009 until 2014. Sawyer started her career in the Nixon White House where she was hired by the Press Secretary at the time, Ron Ziegler. She worked with Nixon to help him write his memoirs after he left office and helped prepare the ex-president for his famous series of television interviews with David Frost in 1977. Sawyer is married to Mike Nichols, the noted film director.

106…TV screen type..LCD

Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

110…Mouselike critter..VOLE

Vole populations can really increase rapidly. Mama vole is pregnant for just three weeks before giving birth to litters of 5-10 baby voles. Then the young voles become sexually mature in just one month! If you have one pregnant vole in your yard, within a year you could have over a hundred of the little critters.

111…Former filly..MARE

There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:

  • Foal: horse of either sex that is less that one year old
  • Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
  • Filly: female horse under the age of four
  • Colt: male horse under the age of four
  • Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
  • Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
  • Mare: female horse four years or older

112…”I must not think there are / Evils __ to darken all his goodness”: Shak…ENOW

Here are some lines from the play “Antony and Cleopatra” by William Shakespeare:

I must not think there are
Evils enow to darken all his goodness: 435
His faults in him seem as the spots of heaven,
More fiery by night’s blackness; hereditary,
Rather than purchased; what he cannot change,
Than what he chooses.

“Antony and Cleopatra” is one of William Shakespeare’s tragedies, telling the story of the relationship between Mark Antony and Cleopatra after the death of Julius Caesar.

114…Dopey comrade..DOC

In the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale called “Snow White”, the seven dwarfs were not given any names. The names were added for the 1937 classic Disney film “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. The seven dwarfs are:

  • Doc (the leader of the group)
  • Grumpy (that would be me, according to my wife …)
  • Happy
  • Sleepy
  • Bashful
  • Sneezy
  • Dopey

116…Reuben basic..RYE

There are conflicting stories about the origin of the Reuben sandwich. One is that it was invented around 1914 by Arnold Reuben, an immigrant from Germany who owned Reuben’s Deli in New York.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Places for reps..GYMS

5…Texter’s “Mercy me!”..OMG

8…National park near Bar Harbor..ACADIA

14…Make the grade..RATE

18…Été month..AOUT

19…By way of..VIA

20…Hard work..LABORS

21…Official order..EDICT

23…Bit of trickery..RUSE

24…Some urban commuter lines..ELS

25…Fitting job for Will?..PROBATE JUDGE

27…Would rather..PREFERS TO

30…Pipe piece..ELL

31…Anchor in a race..GO LAST

32…Strange craft..UFOS

33…2001 Audrey Tautou title role..AMELIE

35…Warble..TRILL

36…White-coated critter..ERMINE

38…Time lines, perhaps..X-AXES

39…Value of a Benjamin..ONE-C

40…”Sesame Street” network..PBS

43…Greyhound, e.g…DOG

44…Hasselblad product..SLR

46…Fitting job for Stu?..HASH HOUSE COOK

49…”Parlez-__ français?”..VOUS

51…Whitman’s dooryard bloomers..LILACS

53…Makes a choice..OPTS

54…Promising..ROSY

55…Fennel-like herb..ANISE

57…Birdhouse creation..NEST

58…Stinging remarks..OWS

59…Sign of life..PULSE

60…Create a new look for..REDESIGN

62…Georgia, for one..FONT

64…Notable periods..ERAS

66…Darken, say..DYE

67…Fitting job for Sue?..TRIAL ATTORNEY

70…Fed. power agcy…TVA

73…Spotted..SEEN

74…Gothic cathedral feature..ARCH

75…Not for the masses..ESOTERIC

77…Long accounts..SAGAS

80…Tournament pass..BYE

81…Seesaw sitter of song..ESAU

83…Beneficial..OF USE

84…Bit of physics..ATOM

85…Hayride perch..BALE

87…Inveterate critic..SNIPER

89…Entom. and geol…SCIS

90…Fitting job for Roger?..RADIO OPERATOR

93…Archaeologist’s project..DIG

95…Colorful pond fish..KOI

96…Supplement, with “to”..ADD

97…Bunch..SLEW

98…Workbench grippers..VISES

100…”You __ worry”..NEEDN’T

102…Eponymous chair maker..EAMES

104…University lecturer..DOCENT

105…Dallas Cowboys logo..STAR

106…One with a flat to fix, maybe..LESSOR

108…Body art, slangily..INK

109…Is more efficient..SAVES TIME

113…Fitting job for Bette?..CASINO DEALER

117…Icky stuff..GOO

118…English : John :: Slavic : __..IVAN

119…Hardly eager anticipation..DREAD

120…Ill-tempered..ORNERY

121…Keebler spokesman..ELF

122…Peter on piano..NERO

123…Phishing targets: Abbr…SSNS

124…Hockey rink area..CREASE

125…Rapper Mos __..DEF

126…Became..GREW

Down

1…Williams title role..GARP

2…The Isley Brothers’ “It’s __ Thing”..YOUR

3…Fitting job for Art?..MUSEUM GUIDE

4…She kept Martina from winning a seventh straight Wimbledon in 1988..STEFFI

5…Pitch too eagerly..OVERSELL

6…Thickness units..MILS

7…It’s paid at pumps..GAS TAX

8…Swiss landscape feature..ALP

9…Negligent..CARELESS

10…Get rid of..ABOLISH

11…Paso __: two-step dance..DOBLE

12…George’s lyricist..IRA

13…Puerto Rico hrs…AST

14…”O Come, O Come Emmanuel” verb..REJOICE

15…”Never __ moment!”..A DULL

16…Clam-digging area..TIDAL POOL

17…Ticker tapes, for short?..ECGS

22…Vietnamese holiday..TET

26…Barnum “attraction”..EGRESS

28…Seemingly forever..EONS

29…Plains people..OMAHAS

34…Common mass transit requirement..EXACT FARE

35…Flanged fastener..T-NUT

36…Composer Grieg..EDVARD

37…TV pundit who wrote “Years of Minutes”..ROONEY

39…”My bad!”..OOPS!

41…Order (around)..BOSS

42…Scottish isle..SKYE

45…Celebrate, as the new year..RING IN

47…Bookstore section..HOW TO

48…French vineyards..CRUS

50…Atlanta-to-Miami dir…SSE

52…Olin of “Chocolat”..LENA

56…__ Park, Colorado..ESTES

58…Precisely..ON THE NOSE

59…Check words..PAY TO

61…Wrath..IRE

63…Needing no Rx..OTC

64…Came after..ENSUED

65…Early 20th-century car..REO

68…Atmosphere component..LAYER

69…Bring in..REAP

70…Fitting job for Miles?..TRUCK DRIVER

71…TV component?..VISION

72…Does the job perfectly..ACES IT

73…Scandinavian natives..SAMI

76…Scruffy couple?..EFS

77…First name in desserts..SARA

78…Slightly..A TAD

79…Nike and Demeter..GODDESSES

80…Gusted..BLEW

82…”Odyssey” threats..SIRENS

85…Ravel classic..BOLERO

86…Tarzan’s foster family..APES

87…Places for prices..STICKERS

88…Lightly wash..RINSE OFF

91…1970 self-titled pop album..OSMONDS

92…”Anne of Green Gables” town..AVONLEA

94…Becomes..GETS

99…Produced..STAGED

101…Having lunch..EATING

103…Like most people..ASIAN

104…Veteran telejournalist Sawyer..DIANE

106…TV screen type..LCD

107…Corn units..EARS

110…Mouselike critter..VOLE

111…Former filly..MARE

112…”I must not think there are / Evils __ to darken all his goodness”: Shak…ENOW

114…Dopey comrade..DOC

115…Miscalculate..ERR

116…Reuben basic..RYE




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6 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Sep 16, Sunday”

  1. Goodness! 10:30, and I’m the first poster? I hope that means everyone’s enjoying a leisurely Sunday morning.

    I had more trouble with this grid than is usual for a Sunday; don’t know if it’s because I was up too late last night, or maybe the puzzle is just a bit harder this week.

    The original paso Doble was indeed French, and it was a much more restrained dance than what’s seen in today’s dance competition. And that’s likely the only place you’ll see the paso Doble performed any more; it’s not a standard ballroom dance anymore, and you’d be hard pressed to find a couple that dances it (or even knows how to dance it) at a party.

    I’ve posted a new recipe on my blog for salmon mousse sous vide. It’s delicious! Please take a moment to check it out: http://wp.me/p41PeZ-k3

    Have a great Sunday everyone, and enjoy the long weekend!

  2. PT Barnum lived (and died) in Bridgeport CT. where I lived for a while in the distant past. The city has considered him part of their historic heritage and has run an extensive PT Barnum Museum there ever since 1955. Many artifacts of Barnum’s career, including his stint in politics, are there. And, yes, there is a sign by the exit saying “This way to the Egress – ten cents.”

  3. Pretty quick for a Sunday online, since that’s the only option here. Normally it takes me :34 or so, but this one was :28.

    @Carrie The picture was actually taken well before yesterday, I just had to endure a long early morning drive to a walk-in passport center in SF to ensure that I got the thing in reasonable time. I’d like to recommend to everyone, never to let your passport expire beyond the mail-in renewal period (15yrs), so you don’t have to endure what I just did. Beyond the early morning drive, I had a 1.5 hr wait, a redo of the application in black ink and a hefty fee (double the original) to get it in two weeks rather than four, plus another $25 fee for registration or something. Still, I managed to remain in good humor.

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