LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Nov 16, Tuesday




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Constructed by: Alex Eaton-Sainers

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Tumbleweed

Today’s themed answers each include a series of four circled letters. Those letters are WEED, and have TUMBLED into different orders:

  • 58A. Desert plant suggested by this puzzle’s circles : TUMBLEWEED
  • 16A. Source of post-toilet training anxiety : BED-WETTING
  • 22A. Surfer’s destination : WORLD WIDE WEB
  • 36A. Great Depression recovery program : NEW DEAL
  • 48A. Youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II : PRINCE EDWARD

Bill’s time: 5m 51s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Wobbly dessert : JELL-O

If you like Jell-O, then you want to stop by LeRoy, New York where you can visit the only Jell-O museum in the world. While at the museum, you can walk along the Jell-O Brick Road …

12. Birdlike : AVIAN

“Avis” is the Latin word for a bird, giving rise to our adjective “avian” meaning “relating to birds”.

13. Drachma replacer : EURO

The Greek drachma was in use until it was replaced by the euro in 2002. As well as being Greece’s currency in modern times, the drachma was also used in ancient Greece.

18. Use too much of, briefly : OD ON

Overdose (OD)

19. Many SAT takers : SRS

Today the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the abbreviation SAT.

20. Dashboard feature : DIAL

Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a board placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from “dashing” against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hoofs of the horses. Quite interesting …

22. Surfer’s destination : WORLD WIDE WEB

In essence, the World Wide Web is a vast collection of documents that is accessible using the Internet, with each document containing hyperlinks which point to other documents in the collection. So the “Web” is different from the Internet, although the terms are often used interchangeably. The Web is the collection of documents, and the Internet is global network of computers on which the documents reside. The Web was effectively the invention of British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I for one am very grateful …

25. Treat, as table salt : IODIZE

Back in 1924, a professor of pediatrics in Michigan led a campaign in the US to have producers of salt add a small amount of sodium iodide to table salt, so that the population would have a readily available source of the iodine micronutrient. His goal was to reduce the incidence of goiter in the population.

28. Major blood vessel : AORTA

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

29. Male in the hive : DRONE

Drone bees and ants are fertile males of the species, whose sole role in life seems to be to mate with a queen.

32. Trailer park parkers : RVS

One using a “recreational vehicle” (RV) might be called an “RVer”.

35. Actor Cariou of “Blue Bloods” : LEN

Len Cariou is a Canadian actor, famous for his Broadway portrayal of “Sweeney Todd”. I most recognize him from supporting roles in “Flags of Our Fathers” and “Thirteen Days”, two great movies.

“Blue Bloods” is a police drama series about a family of police officers led by Police Commissioner Frank Reagan, played by Tom Selleck. The show has been on the air since 2010.

36. Great Depression recovery program : NEW DEAL

The New Deal was the series of economic programs championed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in response to the Great Depression. The New Deal was focused on three objectives, the “3 Rs”:

  1. Relief for the unemployed and poor
  2. Recovery of the economy to normal levels
  3. Reform of the financial system to prevent a repeat depression

40. Letters on a law office door : ESQ

The title “esquire” is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, “esquire” is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

42. “The Hot Zone” virus : EBOLA

The Ebola virus causes a very nasty form of hemorrhagic fever. The name of the virus comes from the site of the first known outbreak, in a mission hospital in the Ebola River Valley in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The disease is transmitted from human to human by exposure to bodily fluids. In nature, the main carrier of Ebola is the fruit bat.

“The Hot Zone” is a 1994 book written by Richard Preston, a non-fiction work describing the history of hemorrhagic fevers (and Ebola in particular).

44. Quick-as-lightning Bolt : USAIN

Usain Bolt is a Jamaican sprinter who won the 100m and 200m race gold medals in both the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games. Back in Jamaica, Bolt was really into cricket and probably would have been a very successful fast bowler had he not hit the track instead.

48. Youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II : PRINCE EDWARD

Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex is British Queen Elizabeth II’s youngest child. When Prince Edward married Sophie Rhys-Jones in 1999, Buckingham Palace announced the intention that the prince will one day inherit his father’s title as Duke of Edinburgh.

52. Illumination units : LUXES

The “lux” is the SI unit of illuminance, and is equal to one lumen per square meter.

54. “The Night Of” channel : HBO

“The Night Of” is an HBO crime miniseries that is based on a British show called “Criminal Justice”. The intention was that James Gandolfini would play the leading role, but after the actor’s passing in 2013, a replacement had to be found. The role eventually went to John Turturro, but Gandolfini is given a posthumous executive producer credit.

58. Desert plant suggested by this puzzle’s circles : TUMBLEWEED

A tumbleweed is the upper part of a plant that has dried out, broken away from the roots, and is blown along by the wind. The tumbleweed spreads seeds or spores as it tumbles.

61. Dingbat : DITZ

The word “dingbat” has been used to mean a “fool” since the early 1900s. It became very popular after it was used repeatedly by Archie Bunker in the seventies TV show “All in the Family”.

62. Flat-package furniture chain : IKEA

The furniture chain IKEA was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym that stands for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

63. River through western Germany : RHINE

The river running through Europe that we know in English as the Rhine, is called “Rhein” in German, “Rhin” in French and “Rijn” in Dutch.

64. Florida island : KEY

A “key” (also “cay”) is a low island offshore, as in the Florida Keys. Our term in English comes from the Spanish “cayo” meaning “shoal, reef”.

65. Video game initials : NES

The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era. Nintendo replaced the NES with Wii, which is also the biggest-selling game console in the world.

Down

4. Murphy’s __ : LAW

Murphy’s Law can be stated as, “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong”. The concept behind the “law” has been around for eons, but the first association with the name “Murphy” appeared in print in 1952.

5. Standard eggs purchase : ONE DOZEN

Our word “dozen” is used for a group of twelve. We imported it into English from Old French. The modern French word for twelve is “douze”, and a dozen is “douzaine”.

6. Play with Lincoln Logs, say : BUILD

The toy known as Lincoln Logs was invented by John Lloyd Wright, the son of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The toy was named after President Abraham Lincoln, who was born in a log cabin.

8. Peat source : BOG

When dead plant matter accumulates in marshy areas, it may not fully decay due to a lack of oxygen or acidic conditions. We are familiar with this in Ireland, because this decaying matter can form peat, and we have lots and lots of peat bogs.

10. Artist nicknamed the “Pope of Pop” : ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol went through a period of painting iconic American products, including Coca-Cola bottles and Campbell’s tomato soup cans. In 1964 he participated in a gallery show called “The American Supermarket”. Along with other pop artists he contributed works including a painting of a can of Campbell’s tomato soup. He priced the painting at $1,500, and sold autographed cans of soup for $6 a piece.

11. Govt. bill : T-NOTE

A Treasury note (T-Note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-Note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-Bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-Bond matures in 20-30 years.

15. Stuck-up sort : SNOB

Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

17. Goodyear product : TIRE

The Goodyear tire company was founded in 1898. The company was named for Charles Goodyear, the man who invented vulcanized rubber in 1839. Despite the Goodyear name, Charles Goodyear himself had no connection with the company.

21. Pres. who developed the 36-Across : FDR
(36A. Great Depression recovery program : NEW DEAL)

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) was the only child of Sara Delano and James Roosevelt Sr. The Delano family history in America goes back to the pilgrim Philippe de Lannoy, an immigrant of Flemish descent who arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621. The family name “de Lannoy” was anglicized here in the US, to “Delano”. Franklin was to marry Eleanor Roosevelt, and apparently the relationship between Sara and her daughter-in-law was very “strained”.

24. Itty bit : IOTA

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

27. Man of La Mancha : DON QUIXOTE

The full name of Cervantes’s novel is “The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha”. In the story, Don Quixote is a retired country gentleman who heads out as a knight-errant and who renames himself Don Quixote of la Mancha. In his mind he designates a neighboring farm girl called Aldonza Lorenzo as his lady love, and renames her Dulcinea del Toboso.

30. Packing rope : TWINE

Our word “twine”, meaning a light string, has the same root as our word “twin”. The original Old English “twin” was a double thread.

33. Chevy’s plug-in hybrid : VOLT

Despite being late entering the eco-friendly car market, Chevrolet today produces the most fuel-efficient compact car with a gasoline engine that is sold in the US. The Chevrolet Volt went on sale at the end of 2010, a plug-in hybrid car that runs on batteries. The Volt has a gasoline engine that can be used run an electric generator if needed. The Volt also uses a regenerative braking system similar to that on my Honda Civic Hybrid, a car that I really love.

37. Great Lake bordering four states : ERIE

Lake Erie borders four US states (Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and Michigan) and one Canadian province (Ontario).

45. Companion of Bashful : SNEEZY

In the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale called “Snow White”, the seven dwarfs were not given any names. The names were added for the 1937 classic Disney film “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. The seven dwarfs are:

  • Doc (the leader of the group)
  • Grumpy (that would be me, according to my wife …)
  • Happy
  • Sleepy
  • Bashful
  • Sneezy
  • Dopey

46. Bldg. coolers : ACS

Room coolers are air conditioning units (ACs).

49. Big name in puzzle cubes : RUBIK

What was originally called the “Magic Cube” became better known as Rubik’s Cube, named for its inventor Ernő Rubik. Rubik’s Cube is the world’s biggest selling puzzle game, with over 350 million sold in just over 30 years.

51. Where to see the Sun, the Sky and the Stars: Abbr. : WNBA

The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) includes the Connecticut Sun, San Antonio Stars and the Chicago Sky.

58. Altoids container : TIN

Altoids breath mints have been around since 1780, when they were introduced in Britain. The famous tin in which Altoids are sold is often reused for other purposes. The most famous use is as a container to hold a mini-survival kit.

59. Island strings : UKE

The ukulele (uke) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Wobbly dessert : JELL-O

6. Pal : BUB

9. Vintner’s tub : VAT

12. Birdlike : AVIAN

13. Drachma replacer : EURO

14. B&Bs : INNS

16. Source of post-toilet training anxiety : BED-WETTING

18. Use too much of, briefly : OD ON

19. Many SAT takers : SRS

20. Dashboard feature : DIAL

21. Reach through the air : FLY TO

22. Surfer’s destination : WORLD WIDE WEB

25. Treat, as table salt : IODIZE

28. Major blood vessel : AORTA

29. Male in the hive : DRONE

30. Sharp-tasting : TART

32. Trailer park parkers : RVS

35. Actor Cariou of “Blue Bloods” : LEN

36. Great Depression recovery program : NEW DEAL

39. Question of method : HOW?

40. Letters on a law office door : ESQ

41. Purges (of) : RIDS

42. “The Hot Zone” virus : EBOLA

44. Quick-as-lightning Bolt : USAIN

47. Apt to malfunction, as wiring : FAULTY

48. Youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II : PRINCE EDWARD

52. Illumination units : LUXES

53. Have __: know someone : AN IN

54. “The Night Of” channel : HBO

57. Slender woodwind : OBOE

58. Desert plant suggested by this puzzle’s circles : TUMBLEWEED

61. Dingbat : DITZ

62. Flat-package furniture chain : IKEA

63. River through western Germany : RHINE

64. Florida island : KEY

65. Video game initials : NES

66. Separates for the wash : SORTS

Down

1. Quick punches : JABS

2. “Did you __?!” : EVER

3. The eyes have them : LIDS

4. Murphy’s __ : LAW

5. Standard eggs purchase : ONE DOZEN

6. Play with Lincoln Logs, say : BUILD

7. Coffee hour vessel : URN

8. Peat source : BOG

9. Purple shade : VIOLET

10. Artist nicknamed the “Pope of Pop” : ANDY WARHOL

11. Govt. bill : T-NOTE

13. And others, in bibliographies : ET AL

15. Stuck-up sort : SNOB

17. Goodyear product : TIRE

21. Pres. who developed the 36-Across : FDR

22. Finish in front : WIN

23. Stuff to sell : WARES

24. Itty bit : IOTA

25. Not employed : IDLE

26. Rock groups? : ORES

27. Man of La Mancha : DON QUIXOTE

30. Packing rope : TWINE

31. Say further : ADD

33. Chevy’s plug-in hybrid : VOLT

34. Rock to music : SWAY

37. Great Lake bordering four states : ERIE

38. Knowledge seekers : LEARNERS

43. Flower source : BUD

45. Companion of Bashful : SNEEZY

46. Bldg. coolers : ACS

47. Get no credit for, in school : FAIL

48. Walk heavily : PLOD

49. Big name in puzzle cubes : RUBIK

50. British noblewomen : DAMES

51. Where to see the Sun, the Sky and the Stars: Abbr. : WNBA

54. Will beneficiary : HEIR

55. Like an arm in a sling : BENT

56. Lyrical lines : ODES

58. Altoids container : TIN

59. Island strings : UKE

60. Question of identity : WHO?

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5 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Nov 16, Tuesday”

  1. Easy grid today. I didn’t even have a write over, but I almost did. I was very tempted to put FAwLTY (as in Basil) rather than FAULTY, but I caught myself. I guess I liked the show that much – ie Fawlty Towers.

    I actually watched The Night Of. It was quite compelling, but the series was only 8 episodes. I guess you could say it was over as fast as you could bat an eyelid…

    Best –

  2. i was going to comment earlier but I got caught up in some urgent work.

    I liked this puzzle and had a good time with it.

    Last night, i came across this Scot and lot, or Scot and bore Lot …….. from wherein comes the word ‘getting off, scot-free’.

    It has nothing to do with the Scots ( the proverbial misers, apparently – ) or Scotland, at all. It was a form of old fashioned tax avoidance or tax evasion of a kind ….. something that someone important right now, seems to have perfected in making a habit of.

    Another interesting fact, the Calorie ( note the capital C) in the nutritional chart you see on every food can (mandated by the FDA, since 1990 ) is actually a kilo-calorie. So 220 Calories is actually 220.000 calories.. The FDA gave everybody a break here, so we dont scare ourselves to starve ourselves, to death ….

    Now you know where your pot belly came from. ( I’m speaking to myself, here – ).

    Have a nice night, all. and hold that sinful chocolate !! …. until tomorrow morn.

  3. Super easy puzzle, took 12 minutes on paper, although I had to change cay to KEY quickly at the end.

    Never heard of Len Cariou, “Blue Bloods” or “The Night Of”, but the crosses helped out.

  4. Hi gents!
    ….as I’m the only DAME here today…
    I kinda struggled with this puzzle, tho I did finish. First, I’ve never heard of LUXES, and in Spanish DON QUIXOTE is spelled with a J, not an X, so for all I knew there could be something called LUJES….but I finally opted for the X. Second, I thought ANDREW was QEII’s youngest son, so I put that in and got tripped up.

    Finally saw the scrambled word: I thought perhaps the theme would have something to do with the new California marijuana laws!!! Apparently now users can carry up to an ounce and it’s legal. You can have up to three marijuana plants in your home. And in a year or so, they’ll have pot stores where you can buy the stuff without a prescription. While I don’t indulge in the stuff myself (IT FREAKS ME OUT!!) I do have a coupla friends who are quite happy about the new laws.

    @Dave and @Vidwan, thanks for the interesting links!

    Speaking of ANDY WARHOL: I saw a cute button today: a pic of Andy, and the words “Your fifteen minutes are up!”

    Despite not having done great for a Tuesday, I’m glad Wednesday’s here so we’ll start some more challenging puzzles. It helps these days to have some serious fluff to distract me…but I’m not going near the weed… I’ll stick with the occasional Margarita?
    Sweet dreams~~™

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