LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Nov 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Drew Banneman
THEME: PC Lab … each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common phrase starting with the letter P, but that P has been changed to a letter C:

24A. Challenge for one with an array of walking sticks? CANE MANAGEMENT (from “pain management”)
26A. Perspective on a heist? CAPER VIEW (from “pay-per-view”)
52A. Farmer? CROPPER NOUN (from “proper noun”)
71A. Sweatshirt part with wrinkles? CREASED HOOD (from “priesthood”)
95A. Anthracite storage site? COAL VAULT (from “pole vault”)
100A. Judge? COURT AUTHORITY (from “port authority”)
33D. ’40s-’50s first lady with her dog? CORGI AND BESS (from “Porgy and Bess”)
37D. Place for a collection of pub mementos? COASTER BOARD (from “poster board”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 37s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Don Rickles specialty INSULT
Don Rickles is a stand-up comedian and actor from Queens, New York. Rickles became known as an “insult comedian” early in his stand-up career, as he handled hecklers in the audience. His witty insults received bigger laughs than his prepared jokes. Rickles’ acerbic style earned him the nicknames “The Merchant of Venom” and “Mr. Warmth”. Rickles was also a popular guest on “The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson”, appearing over 100 times.

15. Reykjavik-born singer BJORK
Björk is a rather eccentric singer-songwriter from Iceland who is a big hit in the UK in particular. Björk is the daughter of a nationally-recognized union leader in her home country.

21. Sophist’s forte RHETORIC
A sophist is someone who engages in devious argument. Originally “sophist” described a wise or learned person, but over time it has become a term of contempt. Our word “sophisticate” comes from the same Greek root.

29. Chou En-__ LAI
Zhou Enlai (also Chou En-Lai) was the first government leader of the People’s Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon’s famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

31. At a Lakers home game, e.g. IN LA
The Los Angeles Lakers basketball team started out in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team chose the Lakers name in honor of the nickname of Minnesota, “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. The Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960.

32. Mortgage limitation RATE CAP
Our word “mortgage” comes from the Old French “mort gaige” which translated as “dead pledge”. The idea was that a pledge to repay a loan dies when the debt is cleared.

39. Novelist Nin ANAIS
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

40. Granite State campus: Abbr. UNH
The University of New Hampshire (UNH) is the largest university in the state. It was founded as the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts in 1866.

New Hampshire is called the Granite State, because it has lots of granite quarries and granite formations.

41. Hockey immortal ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

42. Hair cover SNOOD
A “snood” is a net or a bag worn over the hair. “Snood” comes from the Old English word “snod” meaning a ribbon for the hair.

43. Former boxer Ali LAILA
Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

44. Adventurer Jones, familiarly INDY
“Raiders of the Lost Ark” is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg’s first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in “Star Wars”, and also appeared in Lucas’s “American Graffiti”). Tom Selleck was offered the role but couldn’t get out of his commitments to “Magnum, P.I.” Eventually Spielberg got his way, and that was a good thing I’d say …

45. 85-Across rival RKO
(85A. 45-Across rival MGM)
The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO acronym then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

Marcus Loew was a New Yorker, born into a poor Jewish family. He started out in a penny arcade business and used its profits to buy into a nickelodeon. He built a whole chain of movie theaters, and then moved into the production of films so that he could guarantee supply of features that he could show in his theaters. Eventually he pulled together the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film production company, and sadly passed away just three years after he inked the deal.

46. Writers’ degs. MFAS
Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

47. God of lightning THOR
In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

49. Barrage from bleacher “birds” BOOS
At a sports event, one often sits in the “bleachers”. This is a particularly American term for the tiered stands that provide seating for spectators. These seats were originally wooden planks, and as they were uncovered they would be “bleached” by the sun, giving the name we use today. Sometimes the fans using the bleachers might be referred to as “bleacherites”.

I think “bleacher birds” are the more vocal members of the crowd at a sporting event …

51. Oktoberfest rocks EIS
“Eis” is the German word for “ice”.

Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve been there twice, and it really is a great party …

69. Man with a cube RUBIK
What was originally called the “Magic Cube” became better known as Rubik’s Cube, named for its inventor Ernő Rubik. Rubik’s Cube is the world’s biggest selling puzzle game, with over 350 million sold in just over 30 years.

75. Hail in a harbor AHOY!
“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

78. Mauna __ KEA
Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed.

80. Swiss peak EIGER
The Eiger is a mountain in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. It is a noted peak for mountain climbing, with its treacherous north face being the most famous approach to the summit. Over sixty climbers have died since 1935 on that north face.

83. Social division CASTE
Many creatures organize themselves into a social structure, a phenomenon known as “eusociality”. Examples of such creatures would be ants, bees and wasps, where there are queens, workers and soldiers. The groups within such a hierarchical structure are known as castes. The word “caste” was borrowed from the class divisions in Indian society (although the word “caste” and hierarchical concept was actually introduced by the Portuguese).

86. One in a firing line? AXMAN
A “hatchet man” or “axman” is someone whose job it is to do the dirty work for a superior, like maybe firing people.

91. Tach readings RPMS
The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

92. North Sea feeder YSER
The Yser originates in northern France and flows through Belgium into the North Sea. The Yser is often associated with WWI as it figured in a major battle early in the conflict. In the first three months of the war, the German Army pushed almost completely through Belgium, inflicting heavy losses on the Belgian Army as the defenders were forced to fight a fast-moving rearguard action. The Germans were intent on pushing right through Belgium and across France in a “race to the sea”. But the Belgians, with the help of their Allies, decided to make a final stand at the Yser Canal in an effort to prevent the Germans reaching the French ports of Calais and Dunkirk. The 22-mile long defensive line was chosen at the Yser because the river and canal system could be flooded to create a barrier that might be defended. The plan was successful and the front was “stabilized”. As we now know, millions of lives were lost over the coming years with very little movement of that battle line.

93. Seminary subj. REL
Originally, a “seminary” was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin for “seed”. The first schools labelled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

94. City west of Caen ST LO
Saint-Lô is a town in Normandy that was occupied by Germany in 1940. Saint-Lo stood at a strategic crossroads and so there was intense fighting there during the Normandy invasion of 1944. After a prolonged bombardment, very little of the town was left standing.

Caen, on the River Orne, lies in the Calvados department of France in the northwest of the country. Caen is famous for the WWII Battle of Caen that left the town practically destroyed. Caen is also the burial place of the Norman King William I of England, also known as William the Conqueror after his victory at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

95. Anthracite storage site? COAL VAULT (from “pole vault”)
Anthracite is the variety of coal that has the highest carbon content. It is also the form of coal that generates the most heat when burned.

106. Noted Beethoven interpreter Claudio ARRAU
Claudio Arrau was a greatly respected Chilean pianist who performed for much of the twentieth century until his death in 1991. Arrau left Chile to study in Germany where he lived for many years, having married a German opera singer. During WWII, Arrau and his family left Germany and settled in New York City.

107. Rank follower, for short SERIAL NO
A member of a military group might give his or her name, rank and serial number.

108. City known for wool ANKARA
Ankara is the second largest city in Turkey, after Istanbul (formerly Constantinople). After WWI, the Ottoman Empire had been defeated and the Allies occupied the Ottoman capital of Istanbul. The victors planned to break up most of Turkey, leaving native Turks just part of their country for their own. In the inevitable War of Independence that followed, the Turkish Nationalists used Ankara as their base. When the Nationalists emerged victorious, they declared Ankara the new capital of Turkey.

109. Show prizes TONYS
The full name for the Tony Award is the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre. Antoinette Perry was an American actress and co-founder of the American Theatre Wing, one of the organizations that selects the award recipients.

Down
1. Teacher’s Apple IMAC
Apple makes versions of its iMac line of computers that are aimed at schools. These are usually low-end machines that sell at a reduced price. Apple used to name such an offering an “eMac”, short for “education Mac”.

2. “De __”: “Gracias” response NADA
“Nada” is the Spanish word for “nothing”. “De nada” translates literally from the Spanish as “of nothing”, and is used to mean “you’re welcome” or “don’t mention it”. The French have the same expression “de rien”, also translating to “of nothing” and used the same way.

4. __ Reader UTNE
The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. The “Utne Reader” was founded in 1984, with “Utne” being the family name of the couple that started the publication.

6. Hot pot spot TRIVET
A “trivet” is the name given to something placed under a hot serving bowl to protect the surface of a dining table. The term is also used for a tripod supporting pots over an open fire. “Trivet” comes from the Latin “tripes” meaning “tripod”.

7. Like Delaware’s northern border ARCED
Most of the border between the states of Pennsylvania and Delaware takes the form of an arc, and is referred to as “12-Mile Circle”. Nominally, the arc is taken from a circle with a radius of 12 miles that is centered at the courthouse in the Delaware town of New Castle. The definition of this boundary dates back to a deed granted to William Penn by the Duke of York in 1682.

11. Mogadishu’s land SOMALIA
Mogadishu is a major port city on the west coast of Africa, and is the capital of Somalia. The city is known locally as Xamar.

12. Brawl FRACAS
“Fracas” is a French word that we absorbed into English. In turn, the French usage evolved from the Italian “fracasso” meaning “uproar, crash”.

15. Like Marilyn Monroe’s voice BREATHY
Marilyn Monroe was born in 1926 in LA County Hospital, the child of Gladys Pearl Baker. The young girl was given the name of Norma Jeane Mortenson on her birth certificate, but her mother changed this to Norma Jeane Baker almost immediately. She and her estranged husband, Martin Edward Mortensen, had separated before Baker became pregnant so it is suggested that the Mortensen name was used just to give Norma Jeane “legitimacy”. Norma Jeane married a Jim Dougherty when she 16 years old, and took his name to become Norma Jeane Dougherty in 1932. During WWII she was discovered by a photographer and became quite a successful model. The modelling earned her a screen test, at which time it was suggested that Norma Jean change her name yet again. The first name chosen for her by studio executives was Carole Lind (after Carole Lombard and Jenny Lind), but then Norma Jeane chose “Jeane Monroe” for herself, using her mother’s maiden name. It didn’t take long before the studio intervened again, suggesting that they had too many “Jeans” already. The name Marilyn Monroe was floated as it had a nice ring to it. Along with the new name, Marilyn changed from a brunette to a blonde, and a star was born …

16. Farr of “M*A*S*H” JAMIE
Actor Jamie Farr is best known for playing the cross-dressing Max Klinger in the sitcom ”M*A*S*H”. Although Farr landed a role in the 1955 movie “Blackboard Jungle”, his career didn’t really take off until he started appearing regularly on “The Red Skelton Show”. Years later he managed to get a one-episode appearance in ”M*A*S*H”, and his character and performance was received so well that he became a regular on the show. Farr actually did serve in the US Army in Korea, although it was after hostilities had ended. The dog tags that Farr wore when filming ”M*A*S*H” were the one’s he actually wore while serving in the military.

18. __ Tin Tin RIN
The original Rin Tin Tin was a real-life dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, “Rinty” was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie “Where the North Begins”. Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go …

27. Org. with involved schedules IRS
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

32. Long sentence RUN-ON
A “run-on sentence” is one in which two separate clauses are linked without appropriate conjugation. Two examples would be:

– Today’s crossword is really tough I can’t finish.
– Today’s crossword is really tough, I can’t finish.

More acceptable sentences would be:

– Today’s crossword is really tough. I can’t finish.
– Today’s crossword is really tough; I can’t finish.
– Today’s crossword is really tough, so I can’t finish.

33. ’40s-’50s first lady with her dog? CORGI AND BESS (from “Porgy and Bess”)
Harry and Bess Truman met when they were very young children, at Sunday school. They were friends right through high school and became engaged in 1918 just before Harry went off to France during WWI, marrying the next year. Bess Truman never really took to the Washington scene when she became First Lady and stayed out of the limelight as much as she could. Perhaps that contributed to her longevity. Mrs. Truman lived to the age of 97, making her the longest living First Lady in US history.

The Welsh corgi is a herding dog that originated in Britain, with two recognized breeds: the Pembroke and Cardigan. Corgis aren’t speedy enough to do their job by running around livestock like collies, and instead nip at the heels.

“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and and wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

34. Oscar winner Alan ARKIN
The actor Alan Arkin won his only Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his role in “Little Miss Sunshine” from 2006, a movie that I just did not understand …

35. Jump with all four feet off the ground, gazelle-style PRONK
Stotting (also “pronking”) is the name given to the behavior of animals such a gazelles when they jump straight up into the air with an arched back and legs held straight. It has been suggested that stotting is a signal to a potential predator that the animal is fit and agile, and hence not worth pursuing. “To stot” is a verb used in Scotland and the north of England meaning “to walk with a bounce”. “To pronk” is an Afrikaans verb meaning “to strut, prance, show off”.

37. Place for a collection of pub mementos? COASTER BOARD (from “poster board”)
A “coaster” is a small mat or plate that goes under a glass or cup. Back in the late 1800s, the original coaster was a small drink stand that sat on a table. As the drink stand “coasted” around from guest-to-guest, it earned the name “coaster”.

39. Group with many boomers AARP
AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

A baby boomer is someone who was born in the post-WWII baby boom. The rate of births had been falling fairly steadily in the US at least since 1900, but this trend was sharply reversed in 1946 after WWII. The higher birth rate continued until 1964, when it returned to pre-war levels. Since then the birth rate has continued to decline, although at a slower pace. The period between 1946 and 1964 is defined as the “baby boom”.

49. U2 frontman BONO
Irish singer Bono is a Dubliner, born Paul David Hewson. As a youth, Hewson was given the nickname “Bono Vox” by a friend, a Latin expression meaning “good voice”, and so the singer has been known as Bono since the late seventies. His band’s first name was “Feedback”, later changed to “The Hype”. The band members searched for yet another name and chose U2 from a list of six names suggested by a friend. They picked U2 because it was the name they disliked least …

53. 1980 Tony winner for Best Musical EVITA
“Evita” was the follow up musical to “Jesus Christ Superstar” for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Both of these works were originally released as album musicals, and very successful ones at that (I remember buying them when they first came out). “Evita” was made into a film in 1996, with Madonna playing the title role and Welsh actor Jonathan Pryce playing her husband Juan Perón.

55. Brit’s saltpeter NITRE
The chemical name for saltpeter (also called “niter”) is potassium nitrate. The exact origin of the name “saltpeter” isn’t clear, but it may have come from the Latin “sal petrae” meaning “stone salt”. The main use for potassium nitrate is as a fertilizer, a source of potassium and nitrogen. As it is a powerful oxidizing agent, it is also used in amateur rocket propellants. Anyone who has ignited one of those “engines” would have noticed the lilac-colored flame, indicating the presence of potassium.

60. Specialized jargon ARGOT
“Argot” is a French term, the name given in the 17th century to “the jargon of the Paris underworld”. Nowadays argot is the set of idioms used by any particular group, the “lingo” of that group.

62. “Hip to Be Square” rocker Lewis HUEY
Huey Lewis and the News are a local band out here in the Bay Area, based in San Francisco. When the movie “Ghostbusters” came out in 1984, the band sued Ray Parker, Jr. who wrote the film’s theme song, claiming that it was very similar to their own song “I Want a New Drug”. The case was settled out of court, and the following year “Huey Lewis and the News” made the most of an opportunity to write a movie theme themselves. Their smash hit “The Power of Love” was written for “Back to the Future”, and propelled the band into stardom.

63. Familia members TIOS
In Spanish, one’s mother’s brother (madre’s hermano) is an uncle (tio).

64. Manage, as a museum CURATE
The term “curator” is Latin and applies to a manager, guardian or overseer. In English, the original curators were the guardians and overseers of minors and those with mental disease.

65. Lyrical work EPODE
An epode is a lyric poem made up of couplets in which the first line is long, and the second line much shorter. The form was invented by the Greek poet Archilochus, and was most famously used by the Roman poet Horace.

68. __-Pei SHAR
The Shar Pei breed of dog is that one with the wrinkly face and really dark tongue. The breed originated in China, with “Shar Pei” being the British spelling of the Cantonese name.

70. In __: awaiting delivery UTERO
“In utero” is a Latin term meaning “in the uterus”. The Latin “uterus” translates as both “womb” and “belly”. The Latin word was derived from the Greek “hystera” also meaning womb, which gives us the words “hysterectomy”, and “hysterical”.

71. Bonzo, in a ’51 film CHIMP
“Bedtime for Bonzo” is a 1951 comedy film about a man training a chimpanzee. The man in question is played by future US president Ronald Reagan. After Clint Eastwood was elected mayor of Carmel, California, Reagan called up Eastwood and asked him, “What’s an actor who once appeared with a monkey in movie doing in politics?”. Eastwood appeared with a monkey in the film “Every Which Way but Loose”.

72. “Paula’s Home Cooking” host DEEN
Paula Deen is a celebrity chef from Savannah, Georgia who is noted for her Southern cooking. Deen has been criticized for the amount of salt, fat and sugar in her recipes. The criticism became even more intense when Deen disclosed that she herself has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

75. Zambia neighbor ANGOLA
Angola is a country in south-central Africa, on the west coast. Angola is the fourth largest diamond exporter in Africa, after Botswana, the Congo and South Africa. Such a valuable export hasn’t really helped the living standard of the country’s citizens as life expectancy and infant mortality rates are among the poorest on the continent.

83. Like crows CORVINE
The adjective “corvine” can be used to describe things pertaining to crows and ravens. “Corvus” is the Latin word for “raven”.

86. Joint: Pref. ARTHRO-
The prefix “arthro-” meaning “pertaining to the joints” comes from the Greek “arthron”, the word for “joint”.

87. Org. with Eagles BSA
The rank of Eagle Scout was introduced by the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) in 1911. A candidate for Eagle Scout must have first earned a minimum of 21 merit badges, and demonstrate leadership skills and embrace Scout Spirit. Prior to 1911, the highest rank attainable in the BSA was Wolf Scout.

92. Toys on strings YO-YOS
Would you believe that the first yo-yos date back to 500 BC? There is even an ancient Greek vase painting that shows a young man playing with a yo-yo. Centuries later Filipinos were using yo-yos as hunting tools in the 1500s. “Yo-yo” is a Tagalog (Filipino) word meaning “come-come” or simply “return”.

96. Commercial word with Seltzer ALKA-
The antacid known as Alka-Seltzer used an animated character called Speedy in its adverts from 1951 to 1964. Speedy had an Alka-Seltzer tablet as a body and another as a hat. His job was to get out the message that Alka-Seltzer provided speedy relief!

97. Caspian feeder URAL
The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

99. One way to get to the top T-BAR
A T-bar is a type of ski lift in which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, a similar device, but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

100. “‘Meow’ means ‘woof’ in __”: Carlin CAT
George Carlin was a stand-up comic famous for pushing the envelope of comedy in the broadcast media. Despite all the controversies surrounding his act, his passing in 2008 occasioned major tributes by networks and fellow entertainers alike.

103. __ Arizona USS
The acronym “USS” stands for “United States Ship”. The practice of naming US Navy vessels in a standard format didn’t start until 1907 when President Theodore Roosevelt issued an executive order that addressed the issue.

The USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor sits across the sunken hull of the battleship, the resting place of 1,102 out of 1,117 sailors of the Arizona who were killed during the 1941 attack. After the attack, the superstructure of the Arizona protruded above the surface of the water. This was removed during and after WWII, leaving just a submerged hull. The memorial itself was approved by President Eisenhower in 1958, and the building was opened in 1962. In 1999, the battleship USS Missouri was permanently moored in Pearl Harbor, docked nearby and perpendicular to the Arizona. It was on the Missouri that the Japanese surrendered, marking the end of WWII.

104. One may be seen from La Tour Eiffel ILE
In French, once see some islands (îles) in the Seine river from the Eiffel Tower (La Tour Eiffel).

There are two famous islands in the middle of the River Seine in Paris, one being the Île de la Cité, and the other Île Saint-Louis. Île de la Cité is the most renowned of the two, as it is home to the cathedral of Notre Dame.

The Exposition Universelle (World’s Fair) of 1900 was held in Paris, France. The 1900 fair is remembered for the magnificent entrance arch that was constructed for visitors. That entrance arch was to remain standing for only nine years, but the city decided to keep it and you can visit it today. Today we call that entrance arch the Eiffel Tower.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Don Rickles specialty INSULT
7. Really wants ACHES FOR
15. Reykjavik-born singer BJORK
20. Be relevant MATTER
21. Sophist’s forte RHETORIC
22. Geometry measures RADII
23. God, in Hebrew ADONAI
24. Challenge for one with an array of walking sticks? CANE MANAGEMENT (from “pain management”)
26. Perspective on a heist? CAPER VIEW (from “pay-per-view”)
28. Display aid RACK
29. Chou En-__ LAI
30. Many a comic book collector NERD
31. At a Lakers home game, e.g. IN LA
32. Mortgage limitation RATE CAP
36. Large chamber groups OCTETS
39. Novelist Nin ANAIS
40. Granite State campus: Abbr. UNH
41. Hockey immortal ORR
42. Hair cover SNOOD
43. Former boxer Ali LAILA
44. Adventurer Jones, familiarly INDY
45. 85-Across rival RKO
46. Writers’ degs. MFAS
47. God of lightning THOR
49. Barrage from bleacher “birds” BOOS
50. Opposin’ AGIN’
51. Oktoberfest rocks EIS
52. Farmer? CROPPER NOUN (from “proper noun”)
56. Edge BRINK
57. Session with a model, maybe ART CLASS
59. Ore holders VEINS
60. Pond growth ALGA
61. Put back in RE-ELECT
62. Clued in about HIP TO
63. Clobber TROUNCE
66. Like some collectibles RARE
67. After-school helper TUTOR
68. Joined SIGNED UP
69. Man with a cube RUBIK
71. Sweatshirt part with wrinkles? CREASED HOOD (from “priesthood”)
73. Pal BRO
74. Minuscule bit ATOM
75. Hail in a harbor AHOY!
76. Baltimore-to-Dover direction EAST
77. Set an example LEAD
78. Mauna __ KEA
79. Not out of the game IN IT
80. Swiss peak EIGER
83. Social division CASTE
84. Stumble ERR
85. 45-Across rival MGM
86. One in a firing line? AXMAN
87. Just look BROWSE
89. Fountain order SODA POP
91. Tach readings RPMS
92. North Sea feeder YSER
93. Seminary subj. REL
94. City west of Caen ST LO
95. Anthracite storage site? COAL VAULT (from “pole vault”)
100. Judge? COURT AUTHORITY (from “port authority”)
105. One may evoke ahs in spas OIL RUB
106. Noted Beethoven interpreter Claudio ARRAU
107. Rank follower, for short SERIAL NO
108. City known for wool ANKARA
109. Show prizes TONYS
110. Immaculate SPOTLESS
111. Test drive offerer DEALER

Down
1. Teacher’s Apple IMAC
2. “De __”: “Gracias” response NADA
3. Point on a train schedule STOP
4. __ Reader UTNE
5. Well-educated LEARNED
6. Hot pot spot TRIVET
7. Like Delaware’s northern border ARCED
8. Tobacco wad CHAW
9. Farm girl HEN
10. Always there ETERNAL
11. Mogadishu’s land SOMALIA
12. Brawl FRACAS
13. Farm sound OINK
14. Color TV pioneer RCA
15. Like Marilyn Monroe’s voice BREATHY
16. Farr of “M*A*S*H” JAMIE
17. Dedicatory opus ODE
18. __ Tin Tin RIN
19. Word after mess or media KIT
25. Sweat __ GLANDS
27. Org. with involved schedules IRS
31. Pasta suffix -INI
32. Long sentence RUN-ON
33. ’40s-’50s first lady with her dog? CORGI AND BESS (from “Porgy and Bess”)
34. Oscar winner Alan ARKIN
35. Jump with all four feet off the ground, gazelle-style PRONK
36. Burning ON FIRE
37. Place for a collection of pub mementos? COASTER BOARD (from “poster board”)
38. How-__ TOS
39. Group with many boomers AARP
42. Paint problem SMEAR
43. Cuts short LOPS
44. Promises to pay IOUS
47. Hint TRACE
48. Large number HOST
49. U2 frontman BONO
50. Present in court ARGUE
52. Store employee CLERK
53. 1980 Tony winner for Best Musical EVITA
54. Some picked-up pickups, briefly REPOS
55. Brit’s saltpeter NITRE
56. Fair-haired BLOND
58. Assertion CLAIM
60. Specialized jargon ARGOT
62. “Hip to Be Square” rocker Lewis HUEY
63. Familia members TIOS
64. Manage, as a museum CURATE
65. Lyrical work EPODE
67. Home run run TROT
68. __-Pei SHAR
69. Lawn maintenance tools RAKES
70. In __: awaiting delivery UTERO
71. Bonzo, in a ’51 film CHIMP
72. “Paula’s Home Cooking” host DEEN
75. Zambia neighbor ANGOLA
77. __ school LAW
79. Driving force IMPETUS
80. Use EXPLOIT
81. Wicked IMMORAL
82. Freeway sign word GAS
83. Like crows CORVINE
86. Joint: Pref. ARTHRO-
87. Org. with Eagles BSA
88. Prepare for more shooting RELOAD
90. Impressive spread ARRAY
92. Toys on strings YO-YOS
94. Pace STEP
95. Warehouse stack: Abbr. CTNS
96. Commercial word with Seltzer ALKA-
97. Caspian feeder URAL
98. Attract LURE
99. One way to get to the top T-BAR
100. “‘Meow’ means ‘woof’ in __”: Carlin CAT
101. Gold, to Gomez ORO
102. Server with a spigot URN
103. __ Arizona USS
104. One may be seen from La Tour Eiffel ILE

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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Nov 14, Sunday”

  1. Lazy Sunday here. Decent grid. I wonder if anyone cares that the Lakers play in L.A., given that they are horrible and being handcuffed by Steak Bryant and his "going away Present" of a contract.

    But…it is what it is… Cheers and looking forward to a fun week ahead.

  2. Good afternoon all –

    I'm late here, but I finally did the puzzle.

    Bill, I found this a particularly interesting write up. Lots of new stuff for me too numerous to mention. Thanks to you as well as the setter who provided your ammo.

    I was convinced that 24A "Challenge for one with an array of walking sticks" had "rabologist" in it somehow after yesterday's puzzle, but it was not to be.

    Best –

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