LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Dec 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Matt McKinley
THEME: Morning Addition … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with the letter sequence AM inserted:

23A. Harsh criticism of an old Pontiac? GRAND AM SLAM (from “grand slam”)
27A. Unprincipled operator? AMORAL SURGEON (from “oral surgeon”)
57A. Salesperson who doesn’t take your offer seriously? AMUSED CAR DEALER (from “used car dealer”)
66A. Mexican dish you were warned not to eat? CAUTIONARY TAMALES (from “cautionary tales”)
76A. “Missionary squad loses big in softball game”? APOSTLES CREAMED (from “Apostles’ Creed”)
107A. Memoirs of a penitent bookie? ODDS AND AMENDS (from “odds and ends”)
117A. Really large items thrown overboard? JUMBO JETSAM (from “jumbo jet”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Biblical shepherd ABEL
All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

15. Asian cookware WOKS
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

23. Harsh criticism of an old Pontiac? GRAND AM SLAM (from “grand slam”)
The Pontiac Grand Am was introduced in 1972. Aptly enough, the Grand Am was built in Pntiac, Michigan.

25. Superman or Spider-Man TITLE ROLE
Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

Spider-Man was a creation of Stan Lee, along with Steve Ditko, and first appeared in comics in 1962. Spider-Man was a somewhat groundbreaking character in that his alter ego was a teenage high school student, marking the first time that a young person featured front and center as the superhero.

29. “__, I’m flying in my taxi”: Harry Chapin lyric AND ME
“And me, I’m flying in my taxi” is a line from the 1972 Harry Chapin song “Taxi”.

31. Table salt, in chem class NACL
Sodium chloride (NaCl, common salt) is an ionic compound, a crystal lattice made up of large chloride (Cl) ions in a cubic structure, with smaller sodium (Na) ions in between the chlorides.

32. Pool stroke MASSE
In billiards, a massé shot is one in which the cue ball makes an extreme curve due to the player imparting heavy spin on the ball with his or her cue.

33. Therapists’ org. APA
American Psychiatric Organization (APA)

45. Personal: Pref. IDIO-
The prefix “idio-” indicates something peculiar, as in “idiosyncrasy”, a peculiarity exhibited by an individual or a group.

51. Soviet cooperative ARTEL
The Russian cooperative associations known as artels were often pretty informal affairs. Basically any group could get together and form an artel for any specific commercial purpose … anything from gold-mining and fishing, to stealing and begging.

52. Loud salutes SALVOS
A salvo is a simultaneous discharge of guns. Ironically, “salvo” comes from the Latin “salve” meaning “be in good health”. Salvo was originally the name given to the firing of guns in the air as a sign of respect or greeting for an important visitor. Good health!

55. Type of cell or cent RED
I think the reference “red cell” is to red blood cells.

Something that is “not worth a red cent” has very little value. The “red” reference is to the color of a copper penny.

56. “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” constable ODO
Odo is a character in the “Star Trek” spin-off “Deep Space Nine”. He is the chief of security on the space station and is a Changeling, meaning that he can assume any shape that he wishes. Odo is played by René Auberjonois, an actor you might remember as Father Mulcahy in the movie version of “M*A*S*H”.

62. Annual August golf tournaments, familiarly PGAS
The grand slam of men’s golf is the winning of the four major golf competitions:

– the Masters Tournament
– the US Open
– the Open Championship (aka “the British Open”)
– the PGA Championship

63. Classic theaters RKOS
The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

66. Mexican dish you were warned not to eat? CAUTIONARY TAMALES (from “cautionary tales”)
A tamale is a traditional dish from Central America composed of a starchy dough that is steamed or boiled in a wrapper made of leaves. The dough is called masa, and can include many different ingredients including meat, cheese fruit and vegetables.

71. Current king of Spain __ VI FELIPE
Felipe VI became King of Spain in 2014 when his father, King Juan Carlos I, abdicated. Felipe is quite the competitive sailor, and comes from a sailing family. He was a member of the Spanish sailing team in 1992 Olympics held in Barcelona. His father and sister also sailed for Spain’s Olympic sailing team.

73. Silents star Negri POLA
Pola Negri was a Polish actress, the first star to be invited from Europe to develop a career in Hollywood. Most of her success came in the silent era, but she was able to make the transition to the talkies. Her off-screen life attracted the attention of the gossip columnists who rejoiced in her affairs with the likes of Charlie Chaplin and Rudolph Valentino.

74. Time to beware IDES
In Act I of William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” a soothsayer warns the doomed emperor to “beware the Ides of March”. Caesar ignores the prophecy and is of course killed on the steps of the Capitol by a group of conspirators on that very day.

There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

76. “Missionary squad loses big in softball game”? APOSTLES CREAMED (from “Apostles’ Creed”)
The Apostles’ Creed is a statement of Christian belief that dates back at least to the 4th century. There was a belief that each of the Twelve Apostles contributed an article to the creed, while inspired by the Holy Spirit.

83. Rink legend ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

86. Done like Donne POETIC
John Donne is one of England’s most celebrated poets, working at the start of the 17th century. Donne spent much of his life in poverty and even spent a short time in prison for having married his wife without procuring the appropriate permissions. After his release, his wife bore him 12 children in 16 years, passing away a few days after the twelfth child was born.

88. If it’s orange, it’s really black PEKOE TEA
A pekoe (or more commonly, orange pekoe) is a medium-grade black tea. There is no orange flavor in an orange pekoe tea. The “orange” name most likely derived from the name of the trading company that brought the tea to Europe from Asia.

91. Physics unit DYNE
An erg is a unit of energy or mechanical work. “Erg” comes from the Greek word “ergon” meaning “work”. A dyne is a unit of force. The name “dyne” comes from the Greek “dynamis” meaning “power, force”. Ergs and dynes are related to each other in that one erg is the amount of energy needed to move a force of one dyne over a distance of one centimeter.

93. Race on the water REGATTA
The word “regatta” is Venetian dialect and was originally used to describe boat races among the gondoliers of Venice on the Grand Canal back in the mid-1600s.

96. Kidney-related RENAL
“Ren” is the Latin word for “kidney”.

112. WWII bond designation SERIES E
Series E Savings Bonds were introduced in 1941, just before the start of WWII, as “defense bonds”. After the attack on Pearl Harbor they became known as “war bonds”.

117. Really large items thrown overboard? JUMBO JETSAM (from “jumbo jet”)
Flotsam and jetsam are both terms used to describe “garbage” in the ocean. Flotsam is floating wreckage from a ship or its cargo. Jetsam is similar to flotsam, except that it is part of a ship or cargo that is deliberately cast overboard, perhaps to lighten a vessel.

The term “jumbo jet” describes a widebody aircraft. The first jumbo was the four-engined Boeing 747 introduced in 1970. Then followed the three-engined McDonnell Douglas DC-10 that same year and the Lockheed L-1011 TriStar a few months later. The Airbus A300 was the first two-engined jumbo, which entered service in 1974.

120. Snack in a stack OREO
The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

Down
1. Texas city nickname BIG D
“Big D” is a nickname for the city of Dallas, Texas.

2. About IN RE
The term “in re” is Latin, derived from “in” (in) and “res” (thing, matter). “In re” literally means “in the matter”, and is used to mean “in regard to”, or “in the matter of”.

3. Some govt. lawyers ADAS
Assistant District Attorney (ADA)

4. “The Flying Dutchman” soprano SENTA
The reference here is to Richard Wagner’s opera “The Flying Dutchman”. Erik is a hunter, and the main tenor role. He chases after his ex-love Senta, the soprano in the piece.

8. Two-balled weapon BOLA
Bolas are heavy balls connected by cords that constitute a throwing weapon. Bolas are often used to capture animals by tripping them as they run. The weapon is usually associated with gauchos, the South American cowboys, although there is evidence that the Inca army used them in battle.

9. European cheese town EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

14. Course-plotting “Star Trek” crewman SULU
Mr Sulu was played by George Takei in the original “Star Trek” series. Takei has played lots of roles over the years, and is still very active in television. Did you know that he appeared in the 1963 film, “Pt-109”? He played the helmsman steering the Japanese destroyer that ran down John F. Kennedy’s motor torpedo boat.

16. Chiwere speakers OTOES
Chiwere is a Siouan language spoken by the Otoe people, as well as by the Missouria and Iowa.

17. Bust measurements? KILOS
That would be a drug bust.

30. Woman in a “Paint Your Wagon” song ELISA
“I Still See Elisa” is a song from the Lerner & Loewe musical comedy “Paint Your Wagon”.

“Paint Your Wagon” is a Lerner & Loewe musical comedy that opened on Broadway in 1951. The two most famous songs from the show are “Wand’rin’ Star” and “They Call the Wind Maria”. “Paint Your Wagon” was adapted into a very successful musical film released in 1969 starring Lee Marvin, Clint Eastwood and Jean Seberg. Who can forget the very special rendition of “Wand’rin’ Star” by Lee Marvin?

34. Veal __ PARM
Parmigiana is a dish from southern Italy. The original parmigiana was made with an aubergine filling, with cheese and tomato layers and then baked. Versions originating outside of Italy have replaced the aubergine with breaded cutlets of chicken or veal.

35. Largest of the Near Islands ATTU
Attu is the westernmost island in the Aleutian chain, and so is the westernmost part of Alaska. Japanese forces took the island in October 1942, eventually landing as many as 2,900 soldiers there. In May 1943, the US Army retook the island in twenty days of fighting that is now called the Battle of Attu, the only land battle to take place on US soil during WWII. I am very proud of my father-in-law, who served in the Aleutians in WWII …

The Near Islands of the Aleutian Chain includes the islands of Attu and Agattu. The Near Islands were named by Russian explorers, and the name was chosen as they are the nearest of the Aleutians to Russia.

37. Purim month ADAR
Adar is the twelfth month of the Hebrew ecclesiastical calendar. Ada is equivalent to February-March in the Gregorian calendar.

Purim is a festival commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to wipe them out by Haman the Agagite, as recorded in the Book of Esther. During the celebration of Purim, the Book of Esther (or Megillah) is read aloud, once in the evening and once the following morning. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Old Testament that doesn’t mention the word “God”.

40. La., once TERR
In the Louisiana Purchase the US government bought French Louisiana from France. Soon after the purchase was made, the newly acquired land was split into the Orleans Territory, lands south of the 33rd parallel (and today’s southern border of Arkansas), and the Louisiana Territory, which was the land in the purchase north of the 33rd parallel. The Louisiana Territory stretched northwards as far as the Great Lakes, and the seat of government was chosen as the city of St. Louis. Just to confuse everyone (such as foreigners like me), the Orleans Territory was admitted to the Union in 1812 as the State of Louisiana. At the same time, in a measure designed to prevent confusion, the Louisiana Territory was renamed, to the Territory of Missouri.

41. Lincoln-to-Des Moines dir. ENE
The city of Lincoln is the second-largest in Nebraska, and is the state capital. In the days of the Nebraska Territory, the capital was the larger city of Omaha. When the territory was being considered for statehood, most of the population (which lived south of the River Platte) was in favor of annexation to Kansas. The pro-statehood legislature voted to move the capital nearer to that population in a move intended to appease those favoring annexation. As this conflict was taking place just after the Civil War, a special interest group in Omaha arranged for the new capital to be named Lincoln, in honor of the recently-assassinated president. The thought was that the populace south of the River Platte had been sympathetic to the Confederate cause and so would not pass the measure to move the capital if the Lincoln name was used. But the measure passed, the capital was moved, and Nebraska became the thirty-seventh State of the Union in 1867.

The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

46. Like talent, in a Geoff Colvin best-seller OVERRATED
Geoffrey Colvin wrote the book “Talent is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else”.

53. Vanilla-flavored, as wine OAKY
Wines that are aged in oak are said to exhibit the flavors of vanilla, butter, coconut and dill.

64. Iraq’s __ City SADR
Sadr City is a suburb of Baghdad, oft in the news these days. Sadr City is named after the deceased Shia leader Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr.

65. Monty Python co-founder CLEESE
The magnificent actor and comedian John Cleese came to the public’s attention as a cast member in the BBC’s comedy sketch show “Monty Python’s Flying Circus”. Cleese then co-wrote and starred in the outstanding sitcom “Fawlty Towers”. He even had a role in two “James Bond” films.

66. First name in superhero lore CLARK
Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

67. W, vis-à-vis E OPP
We can use the French phrase “vis-à-vis” as a preposition meaning “compared with”. When used as an adverb or adjective, it means “face to face”, which is a more literal translation from French.

68. Don Knotts denial NOOP
Don Knotts was a comedic actor who played two major roles on television: Barney Fife on “The Andy Griffith Show” in the sixties, and Ralph Furley on “Three’s Company” in the seventies and eighties. Knotts appeared with child actor Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”, and in fact the two are sixth cousins.

72. Where the Shannon flows EIRE
The Shannon is the longest river in Ireland, draining one fifth of the island’s area. It is named for a Celtic goddess named Sionna.

77. Interstellar dist. LT YR
A light-year (lt. yr.) is a measure of distance, not time. It is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year. The accepted abbreviation for a light-year is “ly”. A light-second is a lot shorter distance: about 186,282 miles.

78. Berlin article EINE
“Eine” is the German indefinite article, used with feminine nouns.

Berlin is the capital and largest city in Germany, and is the second most populous city in the European Union (after London).

81. Decorative sewing case ETUI
An etui is an ornamental case used to hold small items, in particular sewing needles. We imported both the case design and the word “etui” from France. The French also have a modern usage of “etui”, using the term to depict a case for carrying CDs.

82. Cabinet part: Abbr. DEPT
In the Westminster system, the Cabinet is a group of sitting politicians chosen by the Prime Minister to head up government departments and also to participate collectively in major governmental decisions in all areas. In the US system, the Cabinet is made up not of sitting politicians, but rather of non-legislative individuals who are considered to have expertise in a particular area. The Cabinet members in the US system tend to have more of an advisory role outside of their own departments.

89. Son of Agamemnon ORESTES
Orestes is a character appearing in Greek mythology, and is the subject of several Ancient Greek plays. In a story by Homer, Orestes kills his mother Clytemnestra. He does so in revenge as Clytemnestra had killed Agamemnon, who was her husband and father to Orestes. Agamemnon was killed by his wife for sacrificing his daughter Iphigenia in order to get favorable winds on a sea voyage. Heavy stuff …

Agamemnon was a figure in Greek mythology, the husband of Helen. When Helen ran off with Paris to Troy, Agamemnon led the united Greek forces in the resulting Trojan War.

90. Travelers’ references ATLASES
The famous Flemish geographer Gerardus Mercator published his first collection of maps in 1578. Mercator’s collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders. That image gave us our term “atlas”.

92. Rogers Centre player BLUE JAY
The SkyDome is a stadium in downtown Toronto, home to the Toronto Blue Jays baseball team and the Toronto Argonauts Canadian football team. The SkyDome was officially renamed to the Rogers Centre when it, and the Toronto Blue Jays team, was purchased by Rogers Communications in 2005.

97. “Sure, I get it” AH SO
The slang term “ah so” is used in American English to mean “I see”. The term derives from the Japanese expression “Ah so desu ka” meaning “Oh, that’s how it is”.

99. Magic center? SOFT G
There is a soft letter G in the center of the word “magic”.

105. Artist El __ GRECO
“El Greco” (“the Greek”, in Spanish) was the nickname of the artist whose real name was Domenikos Theotokopoulos. El Greco was born in Crete in 1541, and moved to Venice to study art when he was in his early twenties. A few years later he moved to the city of Toledo in central Spain, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life.

108. Classic showdown time NOON
Our word “noon”, meaning “midday”, comes from the Latin “nona hora” that translates as “ninth hour”. Back in Ancient Rome, the “ninth hour” was three in the afternoon. Over the centuries, traditions such as church prayers and “midday” meals shifted from 3 p.m. to 12 p.m., and so “noon” became understood as 12 noon.

109. Went off the deep end DOVE
Well, back where I come from, we say “dived” …

110. Commercial prefix with “cell” DURA-
Duracell is a brand of batteries made today by Procter & Gamble. “Duracell” is a portmanteau of “durable” and “cell”.

111. Fish-eating duck SMEW
The smew is a beautiful-looking species of duck found right across northern Europe and Asia. The smew requires trees to complete its breeding cycle as it nests in tree holes, such as old woodpecker nests.

113. Forum infinitive ESSE
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

The Roman forum was the public space in the middle of a city, taking it’s name from the Latin word “forum” meaning “marketplace, town square”.

115. First responders, for short EMTS
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

118. __ mot BON
“Bon mot” translates from French as “good word”. We use “bon mot” (and sometimes just “mot”) to mean a quip, a witticism.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Opinionated assortment BIASES
7. Biblical shepherd ABEL
11. Polaris Rangers, e.g., briefly ATVS
15. Asian cookware WOKS
19. Start a bulleted list, perhaps INDENT
20. Forecast BODE
21. Painful, in a way TRAUMATIC
23. Harsh criticism of an old Pontiac? GRAND AM SLAM (from “grand slam”)
25. Superman or Spider-Man TITLE ROLE
26. Unavoidable end DESTINY
27. Unprincipled operator? AMORAL SURGEON (from “oral surgeon”)
29. “__, I’m flying in my taxi”: Harry Chapin lyric AND ME
31. Table salt, in chem class NACL
32. Pool stroke MASSE
33. Therapists’ org. APA
36. Corporate rule BY-LAW
39. Something for a fan to support THE TEAM
42. Fan appreciation event BAT DAY
45. Personal: Pref. IDIO-
47. Pleads not guilty DENIES IT
51. Soviet cooperative ARTEL
52. Loud salutes SALVOS
55. Type of cell or cent RED
56. “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” constable ODO
57. Salesperson who doesn’t take your offer seriously? AMUSED CAR DEALER (from “used car dealer”)
61. [Uh-oh!] GULP!
62. Annual August golf tournaments, familiarly PGAS
63. Classic theaters RKOS
64. Aiming devices SCOPES
66. Mexican dish you were warned not to eat? CAUTIONARY TAMALES (from “cautionary tales”)
71. Current king of Spain __ VI FELIPE
73. Silents star Negri POLA
74. Time to beware IDES
75. Truth stretcher LIAR
76. “Missionary squad loses big in softball game”? APOSTLES CREAMED (from “Apostles’ Creed”)
83. Rink legend ORR
84. Tee sizes: Abbr. SMS
86. Done like Donne POETIC
87. Rancor SPITE
88. If it’s orange, it’s really black PEKOE TEA
91. Physics unit DYNE
92. Strengthen BEEF UP
93. Race on the water REGATTA
96. Kidney-related RENAL
98. Match in size FIT
99. Doo-wop band instruments SAXES
102. After-hours LATE
104. Hoods THUGS
107. Memoirs of a penitent bookie? ODDS AND AMENDS (from “odds and ends”)
112. WWII bond designation SERIES E
116. Carefree FOOTLOOSE
117. Really large items thrown overboard? JUMBO JETSAM (from “jumbo jet”)
119. Life partners TRUE LOVES
120. Snack in a stack OREO
121. Nails the test ACES IT
122. Doesn’t have to ask about GETS
123. Egg holder NEST
124. Sign of boredom YAWN
125. Techniques involving falsetto YODELS

Down
1. Texas city nickname BIG D
2. About IN RE
3. Some govt. lawyers ADAS
4. “The Flying Dutchman” soprano SENTA
5. Conclude with END IN
6. One awaiting a cancellation STANDBY
7. Six-pack set ABS
8. Two-balled weapon BOLA
9. European cheese town EDAM
10. Bar fruit LEMON
11. Hook on ATTACH
12. Warbled TRILLED
13. Winery fixtures VATS
14. Course-plotting “Star Trek” crewman SULU
15. Simulated military exercise WAR GAME
16. Chiwere speakers OTOES
17. Bust measurements? KILOS
18. Not a good thing to make SCENE
22. Marine myth MERMAID
24. “Goodness!” MY MY!
28. Traitor RAT
30. Woman in a “Paint Your Wagon” song ELISA
33. Simple rhyme scheme ABAA
34. Veal __ PARM
35. Largest of the Near Islands ATTU
37. Purim month ADAR
38. Like most zoo animals WILD
40. La., once TERR
41. Lincoln-to-Des Moines dir. ENE
43. Give up DESPAIR
44. Advantage to get A LEG UP
46. Like talent, in a Geoff Colvin best-seller OVERRATED
48. Liquid courses SOUPS
49. Not working IDLE
50. Beats TOPS
53. Vanilla-flavored, as wine OAKY
54. Machine displaying fruit symbols SLOT
58. Go out with DATE
59. CBS drama since 2000 CSI
60. Spanish “that” ESA
61. Throws a fit GOES APE
64. Iraq’s __ City SADR
65. Monty Python co-founder CLEESE
66. First name in superhero lore CLARK
67. W, vis-à-vis E OPP
68. Don Knotts denial NOOP
69. Too ALSO
70. Open __ night MIC
71. Disaster FLOP
72. Where the Shannon flows EIRE
76. Fishing, perhaps ASEA
77. Interstellar dist. LT YR
78. Berlin article EINE
79. Canine attraction SCENT
80. Annoy MIFF
81. Decorative sewing case ETUI
82. Cabinet part: Abbr. DEPT
84. Phrase on a fortuneteller’s business card SEES ALL
85. Office conf. MTG
89. Son of Agamemnon ORESTES
90. Travelers’ references ATLASES
92. Rogers Centre player BLUE JAY
94. Least likely to bite TAMEST
95. Downed ATE
97. “Sure, I get it” AH SO
99. Magic center? SOFT G
100. Be gaga over ADORE
101. Marked for deletion X’D OUT
103. Relish ENJOY
105. Artist El __ GRECO
106. Located SITED
108. Classic showdown time NOON
109. Went off the deep end DOVE
110. Commercial prefix with “cell” DURA-
111. Fish-eating duck SMEW
113. Forum infinitive ESSE
114. Zip (through) SAIL
115. First responders, for short EMTS
118. __ mot BON

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8 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Dec 15, Sunday”

  1. Enough I didn't know on this one so it turned into a DNF. Only so many things you have to look up before it turns into a lost cause.

    Got a decent evaluation of the Newsday Sunday grid (zero errors) and Birnholz's grid (3 minor errors and a lookup to resolve the Natick at 68A/62D). A bit surprised on the latter, I guess because I was expecting something different, though. Maybe they told him to tone down the esoteric stuff? But I did see through the cutesy theme stuff which maybe contributed to such a result?

    The Saturday Newsday will be quite the challenge for those who are looking for one, though. Only managed 3 answers before I finally had to quit that one.

    The 21×21 WSJ remains, unless I end up hitting the NYT 21×21. But I have a better idea of what's out there now, at least until I find more that's unfamiliar to me to try out.

  2. Par for the course for a Sunday, but it's cold and rainy here so it was a nice diversion nonetheless. Bust measurement for KILOS went right over my head until I saw the blog.

    Irony of the day: The St. Louis Rams are holding a Fan appreciation event today – three weeks before owner Stan Kroenke officially submits his bid to the NFL to move the team back to Los Angeles. What a guy…

    Best –

  3. 36:22, two errors (well, one letter, two answers): I put AFA / FARM instead of APA / PARM. It seems as if the clue for 34D should have indicated that the answer was abbreviated (in which case, I would have guessed correctly). Oh, well …

  4. This was a slow process but it ended up as a successful solve. I watch football and then go back to the puzzle and then back to football, etc. I didn't find the grid particularly difficulty, but I find the Sunday puzzle on a par with Thursday in terms of how much of a brain strain getting it done is typically. I've always been good with general trivia, which comes in handy for the big grid.

    See you all tomorrow. Have a good Sunday night all.

  5. Wait a minute–BAT DAY?! Surely no teams give out bats to fifty thousand possibly rowdy fans?! Even the foot-long minis –dangerous, no? I was all set with CAP DAY. Seriously, does anyone know if bats are/were ever given out at games?
    Still haven't finished this grid…hope to before NEXT Sunday.
    Be well~~™

  6. Finally got around to finishing with help from this blog. I was going to comment about how Bobby Orr (83A) revolutionized the defence position in hockey, but I need to point out that Esther is not the only book in the Old Testament which doesn't mention God (see 37D discussion). The book known as either "Song of Solomon" or "Song of Songs", the most R-rated book in the Bible, does not mention God either.

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