LA Times Crossword Answers 12 Jan 14, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: Storm Front Coming … each of today’s themed answers ends with something that could be BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND:

23A. *”Brace yourself” HOLD ON TO YOUR HAT
41A. *Signal surrender RAISE A WHITE FLAG
56A. *1965 Rolling Stones hit GET OFF OF MY CLOUD
66A. *Pasta choice ANGEL HAIR
71A. *Image on a North American flag MAPLE LEAF
84A. *Sloshed HIGHER THAN A KITE
101A. *The company one keeps, often BIRDS OF A FEATHER

121A. Bob Dylan classic, and what this puzzle’s starred clues’ answers’ endings could be BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … PAWS AT (maws at!!!), PINSK (Minsk!!!)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Anti-DUI org. MADD
Candice Lightner lost her 13-year-old child to a drunk driver in 1980. Soon after, Lightner formed the group Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD).

In some states, there is no longer a legal difference between a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) and a DUI (Driving Under the Influence). Other states retain that difference, so that by definition a DUI is a lesser offence than a DWI.

11. Dove purchase BAR
Unilever make a line of personal care products under the brandname “Dove”. The product line includes bars of soap.

As a helpful reader pointing out below in a comment, this clue may also refer to the Dove Bar ice cream bar, which is now made by M&M/Mars. The Dove Bar is a small block of ice cream covered in chocolate, and was introduced by a Chicago-based company in 1956. The “Dove” brand of chocolate came later, and is named for the ice cream bar. We didn’t have Dove Bars where I grew up on the other side of the Atlantic. Over there we use the generic term “choc ice” for similar treats.

22. Setting for 103 World Series games BRONX
The New York City borough known as the Bronx takes its name from the Bronx River that runs through it. The river was named after Jonas Bronck, an early immigrant to the Dutch colony of New Netherland. Bronck’s farm gave rise to the name “Broncksland” and “Bronck’s River”.

The New York Yankees baseball team has the nickname “the Bronx Bombers”. The nickname reflects where the team plays (the Bronx) and the team’s reputation for hitting (bombers).

25. With 34-Across, pitcher who holds the major league record for career appearances JESSE
(34A. See 25-Across OROSCO)
Jesse Orosco is a former baseball pitcher who played for several teams including the New York Mets and the Los Angeles Dodgers. Orosco had a long playing career, retiring when he was 46 years old. Partly because of that long career, he holds the major league record for career pitching performances: 1,252 games.

28. Vaudeville presentation REVUE
“Revue” is the French word for “review”.

The Vire is a river that flows through Normandy in France. The poets of the Vire valley were known as the “Vau de Vire”, a term that some say gave rise to our word “Vaudeville”.

32. Former auto financing org. GMAC
GMAC is short for General Motors Acceptance Corporation. General Motors has only a small stake in GMAC now, and indeed the name has been officially changed to Ally Bank. You and me, we are the biggest shareholders in GMAC/Ally today, since the US government gave the bank $12.5 billion to bail it out in 2008-2009.

38. Classic movie motel BATES
Bates Motel and house were constructed on the backlot of Universal Studios for the 1960 HItchcock movie “Psycho”. They are still standing, and for me are the highlight of the backlot tour that is available to visitors.

46. Mideast sultanate OMAN
Qaboos bin Said al Said is the current Sultan of Oman, who came to power in a coup in 1970 by deposing his own father. Qaboos has no children, and no agreed heir. His current instructions are for the royal family to agree on a successor after his death. Qaboos has also specified that should the royal not be able to agree on a successor, then the country’s Defense Council will make the decision, choosing between two names that the Sultan placed in a sealed envelope to be opened after his passing.

48. Internet chat option SKYPE
The main feature of the Skype application is that it allows voice communication to take place over the Internet (aka VoIP). Skype has other features such as video conferencing and instant messaging, but the application made its name from voice communication. Skype was founded by two Scandinavian entrepreneurs and the software necessary was developed by a team of engineers in Estonia. The development project was originally called “Sky peer-to-peer” so the first commercial name for the application was “Skyper”. This had to be shortened to “Skype” because the skyper.com domain name was already in use.

50. Alaska’s __ Sound NORTON
The town of Nome lies on the northern edge of the Norton Sound, an inlet of the Bering Sea in Alaska. Norton Sound was named by Captain James Cook in 1778, in honor of Sir Fletcher Norton who was Speaker of the British House of Commons at that time.

52. Shakespearean villain IAGO
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. Iago is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. He hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife. By the end of the play it’s Iago himself who is discredited and Othello (before committing suicide) apologizes to Cassio for having believed Iago’s lies. Heavy stuff …

54. “The Flower of My Heart,” in an old song ADELINE
“Sweet Adeline” is a marvelous ballad that is most often heard these days sung by barbershop groups. My favorite version of “Sweet Adeline” was sung by the Australian group called the Seekers.

56. *1965 Rolling Stones hit GET OFF OF MY CLOUD
“Get Off of My Cloud” is the single that came right after the Rolling Stones super-hit “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”. Both records were released in 1965.

62. Support for a start-up co. SBA
The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency with the mission of assisting small businesses. The SBA doesn’t give loans itself, but it does act as a guarantor under the right circumstances. The SBA was set up in 1953, and isn’t a favorite with fiscal conservatives.

63. Egg __ yung FOO
Egg foo yung is a dish served in Chinese restaurants, and is basically an omelet. It probably takes its name from a flower called the Fu Yung.

65. Kipling’s young spy KIM
“Kim” is a novel by Rudyard Kipling that was first published in serial form, from 1900 to 1901. The title character is the orphaned son of an Irish soldier who lives like a vagabond in India during the days of the British Raj. The boy grows up to become a spy working for the British.

66. *Pasta choice ANGEL HAIR
Capellini is a pasta that is like a thin spaghetti. An even thinner version of the pasta is known as “capelli d’angelo”, which translates as “angel hair”.

71. *Image on a North American flag MAPLE LEAF
The current design of the Canadian National Flag, known as “the Maple Leaf”, has been in place since 1965. It made its first appearance on February 15th of that year, and so that date is celebrated annually as National Flag of Canada Day.

75. Ballot word: Abbr. IND
Independent (Ind.)

Today a “ballot” is a piece of paper used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

76. Genetic chains RNAS
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

89. Chrysler Building style ART DECO
The Chrysler Building in Manhattan is a magnificent Art Deco style structure that was opened in 1930. Standing at over 1,000 feet tall, it was the tallest building in the world for almost a year, until the Empire State Building was completed in 1931. The building was constructed for use of the Chrysler Corporation, but the company never owned it. The car manufacturer’s founder decided to pay for the Chrysler Building out if his personal wealth, so that he could pass it on to his children.

91. Bounder ROUE
“Roue” is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. “Roue” comes from the French word “rouer” meaning “to break on a wheel”. This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

92. Of a battery terminal ANODAL
The two terminals of a battery are called the anode and the cathode. Electrons travel from the anode to the cathode creating an electric current.

98. Turkish empire founder OSMAN
Osman I was the man who established the Ottoman Dynasty, with “Ottoman” coming from the name “Osman”. This is despite the fact that the “Ottoman Empire” came about with the conquest of Constantinople, and that didn’t happen until almost 130 years after Osman I died.

101. *The company one keeps, often BIRDS OF A FEATHER
The phrase “bird of a feather flock together” has been used at least since the 1500s in some form. The idea is that birds of a particular species tend to fly together, and we use the phrase to mean that people with similar tastes tend to congregate.

106. __ Helens MT ST
Only two volcanoes in the Cascade Range in the northwest have erupted in the 20th century: Mount St. Helens in 1980 and Mount Lassen in 1915. The last significant eruption of Mount Shasta, a third volcano in the Cascades, was about 200 years ago

107. Gillette shaver ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

109. Ancient fabulist AESOP
Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

118. Composer Boccherini LUIGI
Luigi Boccherini was a composer and cellist from Lucca in Italy who was active in the classical era. Boccherini’s best known works are a minuet from a String Quintet in E, and
his Cello Concerto in B flat major.

121. Bob Dylan classic, and what this puzzle’s starred clues’ answers’ endings could be BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND
Bob Dylan wrote the famous song “Blowin’ in the Wind” in 1963, apparently taking all of ten minutes to finish the whole composition.

As most of us know, the real name of singer Bob Dylan is Robert Zimmerman. Zimmerman chose that particular stage name because he was greatly influenced by the poetry of the Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas.

125. Museum Folkwang city ESSEN
The Museum Folkwang is a major art museum in the German city of Essen. The museum opened as a private collection in 1902, and became a public facility in 1922.

126. For keeps, to Keats E’ER
The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

128. 1980 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award recipient SEUSS
Dr. Seuss was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. Geisel was commander of the Animation Department of the USAF during WWII. He was behind many propaganda films including one called “Our Job in Japan”. Even though the film was produced specifically as propaganda, this same movie was used after the war as a basis for the short feature “Design for Death”, a study of Japanese culture released in 1947 and winner of an Oscar for best Documentary.

The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award is a bronze medal prize that is presented annually to writers or illustrators of children’s literature. The prize was first awarded to author Laura Ingalls Wilder, in 1954, and was named in her honor.

Laura Ingalls Wilder was an author from Pepin, Wisconsin who is best remembered for her “Little House” series of children’s novels. The series was based on her own childhood in a pioneer family that moved from Wisconsin to Kansas and back again. Laura was blind from her teen years.

130. French card game ECARTE
Écarté is a card game that comes to us from France, with a name that translates into ‘discarded”. Écarté is a game like whist but is played with a stripped-down deck and involves only two players.

131. Speed Wagons, e.g. REOS
The REO Speed Wagon (note the space between “speed” and “wagon”) is the vehicle. REO Speedwagon is the American rock band.

Down
1. Mineralogist Friedrich MOHS
The Mohs scale of mineral hardness was developed in 1812 by Freidrich Mohs. Basically Mohs took minerals and scratched them with other minerals. In this way he was able to determine which minerals were hardest (most scratch resistant) and which softest.

2. Warwickshire river AVON
There are actually four rivers called the Avon in England, but “Shakespeare’s Avon” lies mainly in Warwickshire. The name “Avon” comes from the Old English word for a river, “abona”. Stratford-upon-Avon was of course the birthplace of William Shakespeare’s.

3. A stet cancels it DELE
“Dele” is the editorial instruction to delete something from a document, and is often written in red.

“Stet” is the Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” beside the change and then underscoring the change with a line of dots or dashes.

4. DJ who first promoted “Weird Al” Yankovic DR DEMENTO
Dr. Demento is the persona used on radio by broadcaster Barry Hansen. Dr. Demento is best known for bringing “Weird Al” Yankovic to national attention. Yankovic has returned the favor since achieving his fame and has given Dr. Demento spots in his music video’s and in his movie “UHF”.

Weird Al Yankovic is famous for his parodies of songs like “Eat It”, his parody of Michael Jackson’s “Beat It”. Yankovic also takes a lot of popular songs and rearranges them as polkas, such as “Bohemian Polka” which is based on Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody”.

5. City in southern Belarus PINSK
Pinsk is a city in Belarus that lies to the southeast of the nation’s capital of Minsk. The city’s name derives from the river Pina on which it is built.

6. MLB VIP Scott Boras, e.g. AGT
Scott Boras is a sports agent, primarily representing professional baseball players. Boras runs his agency out of Newport Beach, California.

12. “Tyranny and __ are never far apart”: Bentham ANARCHY
Jeremy Bentham was a British philosopher who is sometimes called the father of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism is the theory that the proper course of action is one that maximizes happiness and reduces suffering.

16. Cyclades island IOS
The Cyclades are a group of islands in the Aegean Sea lying southeast of the Greek mainland. There are about 200 islands in the group, almost all of which are the peaks of a submerged mountain range. Ios is one of the larger islands, 11 miles long and 6 miles wide.

17. Hosp. employees RNS
Registered nurses (RNs)

20. Writer Ephron et al. NORAS
Nora Ephron had many talents, including writing film scripts and novels. Many of the movies that she wrote, she also directed. These would include some of my favorite movies of all time like “Sleepless in Seattle”, “You’ve Got Mail” and most recently, the wonderful “Julie & Julia”. And, did you know that Nora Ephron’s second marriage was to journalist Carl Bernstein of Watergate fame? She wrote an autobiographical novel based on her life with Bernstein, dealing in particular with Bernstein’s affair with the daughter of British Prime Minister James Callaghan.

24. Plum tomatoes ROMAS
The Roma tomato isn’t considered to be an heirloom variety, but it is very popular with home gardeners, especially those gardeners that don’t have a lot of space. It is a bush type (as opposed to vine type) and needs very little room to provide a lot of tomatoes.

31. Pitching stat ERA
Earned run average (ERA)

36. Wouk’s mutinied minesweeper CAINE
Herman Wouk won a Pulitzer in 1951 for his novel “The Caine Mutiny”. The story involves mutiny and court-martial aboard a US Navy vessel and reflected, at least partly, the personal experiences of Wouk as he served in the Pacific in WWII aboard a destroyer-minesweeper. The novel was adapted into a marvelous film released in 1954 starring Humphrey Bogart as Philip Queeg, the harsh captain of the USS Caine.

39. Lab slide creature AMOEBA
An ameba (or “amoeba” as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

40. Highland wear TARTAN
Tartan is sometimes called “plaid” over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a “plaid” is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

43. Start and end of a trademark cartoon credo I YAM
“I yam what I yam …” were words oft spoken by Popeye.

Popeye first appeared in 1929 in a comic strip called “Thimble Theatre”. The strip, created by E. C. Segar, ran for ten years before Popeye made an appearance. Popeye received such a great welcome from readers that he soon “took over” the strip, and eventually even hogged the strip’s title. Before Popeye turned up Olive Oyl was the main character.

53. Anxious med. condition OCD
Apparently obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as common as asthma.

55. One “trapped by his sinful talk,” in Proverbs EVIL MAN
The Book of Proverbs is in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. The original Hebrew title for the book translates as “Proverbs of Solomon”.

58. Armstrong’s carrier LEM
In the Apollo program, the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) was the vehicle that actually landed on the moon and returned the astronauts to the command module that was orbiting overhead. The third LEM built was named “Spider”, and it participated in the Apollo 9 mission which tested the functionality of the LEM design in space. The fourth LEM was called “Snoopy” and it flew around the moon in the Apollo 10 mission, the dress rehearsal for the upcoming moon landing. Apollo 11’s LEM was of course called “Eagle” and it brought Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to and from the moon’s surface. Another famous LEM was Apollo 13’s Aquarius. Although Aquarius never landed on the moon, it did serve as a “lifeboat” for the three astronauts after the explosive rupture of an oxygen canister in the Service Module.

Neil Armstrong was the most private of individuals. You didn’t often see him giving interviews, unlike so many of the more approachable astronauts of the Apollo space program. His famous, “That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind” statement; that was something that he came up with himself while Apollo 11 was making its way to the moon.

59. Paganini’s hour ORA
Niccolò Paganini was a famed Italian violinist and composer. Paganini was perhaps the most celebrated violinist of the 19th century. His most famous composition has to be his Caprice No. 24 in A minor, Op. 1. This work is the basis for many derivative masterpieces by other composers, including the wonderful “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” by Rachmaninoff.

65. Actor Wynn KEENAN
Keenan Wynn was a character actor who played many roles on television and in movies. Keenan’s father was the actor and comedian Ed Wynn.

68. NPR journalist Shapiro ARI
Ari Shapiro is the very able White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR).

69. Like Haydn’s “Surprise Symphony” IN G
Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 94 in G major is nicknamed “The Surprise Symphony”. Haydn was very fond of including a little humor in his music, and the “surprise” in Symphony No. 94 is the most famous. That surprise is a very loud chord at the end of a very quiet and lyrical passage in the second movement. As a result, the German nickname for “The Surprise Symphony” is “The Symphony with the Kettledrum Stroke”.

72. NYC airport LGA
When traveling to New York City (NYC), one might fly into LaGuardia Airport (LGA).

Fiorello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears La Guardia’s name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to “New York” and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. The Mayor demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city’s limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called “LaGuardia” as a nickname. The airport was officially relabeled as “LaGuardia” in 1947.

74. Natasha __, Boris’ partner in spydom FATALE
Boris and Natasha are two characters on the animated television series “The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show”.

77. Mass delivery: Abbr. SER
Sermon (Ser.)

80. Birthplace of Apollo DELOS
Delos is a Greek island in the Cyclades archipelago. Delos played an important part in Greek mythology as the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis.

81. Swedish imports SAABS
SAAB stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. SAAB was, and still is, mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automobile division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000, who then sold it to a Dutch concern in 2010. However, SAAB (automotive) finally went bankrupt in 2011.

86. Behind TUSH
“Tush” is a slang term for the backside, an abbreviation of “tochus” that comes from the Yiddish “tokhes”.

87. Blood pigment HEME
Myoglobin is a protein found in muscle tissue of mammals. It is similar to hemoglobin, the oxygen and iron binding protein found in red blood cells. Both myoglobin and hemoglobin contain heme, a complex molecule containing iron at its center. In muscle, it is the presence of myoglobin that gives meat its red color.

88. ’50s conflict KOREAN WAR
The Korean War took place from 1950 to 1953 and was fought between the Republic of Korea (the South) and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (the North). The war came about because, at the end of WWII, Korea was divided by the allies along the 38th Parallel, with the Soviet Union controlling territory north of the line, and the US occupying the south. North Korean troops invaded the south in 1950, which started the armed conflict. An armistice was signed in 1953 which restored the border, but there are outbreaks of fighting to this very day, as we all well know.

96. Juvenile newt EFT
Newts wouldn’t be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

99. First name at old Notre Dame ARA
Ara Parseghian coached the Notre Dame football team from 1964 to 1974, a period known as “The Era of Ara”.

102. Geese flocks in flight SKEINS
Apparently geese fly in a V-formation (also called a skein) for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to “slipstream” a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when he/she gets fatigued. It’s also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

112. A hundred smackers ONE C
“Smacker” is American slang for “money”, with “smackers” often being used to mean ”dollars”. It is suggested that the term might come from “smacking” a banknote into one’s hand.

113. Galileo’s birthplace PISA
Galileo Galilei may be the most famous son of the city of Pisa in Italy and was considered by many to have been the father of modern science. In the world of physics, Galileo postulated that objects of different masses would fall at the same rate provided they did so in a vacuum (so there was no air resistance). There is a story that he dropped two balls of different masses from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate this, but this probably never happened. Centuries later, Astronaut David Scott performed Galileo’s proposed experiment when he dropped a hammer and feather on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission and we all saw the objects hit the moon surface, at exactly the same time.

117. Ice cream name EDY’S
Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dryer and Joseph Edy.

118. “__ Miz” LES
The 1980 musical “Les Misérables” is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London’s West End. My wife and I saw “Les Miz” in the Queen’s Theatre in London quite a few years ago, but were only able to get tickets in the very back row. The old theater’s seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting drinking Coke, even smoking cigarettes. On cue, the stagehands would get up and catch a dropped rifle, or an actor that had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn’t really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the musical version of the storyline just didn’t seem to hang together for me.

120. Pocatello sch. ISU
Idaho State University is located in Pocatello, Idaho. The school started out in 1901 as the Academy of Idaho.

122. Surg. centers ORS
Operating Rooms (ORs) are surgical (surg.) centers.

123. ATM initials NCR
NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884, originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo.

124. Mummy discovered by Howard Carter in 1922 TUT
King Tut is a name commonly used for the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen. Tutankhamen may not have been the most significant of the pharaohs historically, but he is the most famous today largely because of the discovery of his nearly intact tomb in 1922 by Howard Carter. Prior to this find, any Egyptian tombs uncovered by archaeologists had been ravaged by grave robbers. Tutankhamen’s magnificent burial mask is one of the most recognizable of all Egyptian artifacts.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Anti-DUI org. MADD
5. Plays with, as a toy mouse PAWS AT
11. Dove purchase BAR
14. Burning up AFIRE
19. Motel patron, usually OVERNIGHTER
21. Get __ for effort AN A
22. Setting for 103 World Series games BRONX
23. *”Brace yourself” HOLD ON TO YOUR HAT
25. With 34-Across, pitcher who holds the major league record for career appearances JESSE
26. Ugly looks SNEERS
27. Within: Pref. ENDO-
28. Vaudeville presentation REVUE
30. Reconcile, with “up” MAKE
32. Former auto financing org. GMAC
34. See 25-Across OROSCO
38. Classic movie motel BATES
41. *Signal surrender RAISE A WHITE FLAG
46. Mideast sultanate OMAN
47. Gut course EASY A
48. Internet chat option SKYPE
49. Court setting BAIL
50. Alaska’s __ Sound NORTON
52. Shakespearean villain IAGO
54. “The Flower of My Heart,” in an old song ADELINE
56. *1965 Rolling Stones hit GET OFF OF MY CLOUD
61. Barn roof gadgets VANES
62. Support for a start-up co. SBA
63. Egg __ yung FOO
64. Skin suffix -DERM
65. Kipling’s young spy KIM
66. *Pasta choice ANGEL HAIR
71. *Image on a North American flag MAPLE LEAF
75. Ballot word: Abbr. IND
76. Genetic chains RNAS
78. Stellar sort GEM
79. Down the tubes BAD
81. Spiritual essences SOULS
84. *Sloshed HIGHER THAN A KITE
89. Chrysler Building style ART DECO
91. Bounder ROUE
92. Of a battery terminal ANODAL
93. Busy as __ A BEE
94. Runner-up LOSER
98. Turkish empire founder OSMAN
100. Move, to a Realtor RELO
101. *The company one keeps, often BIRDS OF A FEATHER
104. Hands over CEDES
105. Like licked lollies STICKY
106. __ Helens MT ST
107. Gillette shaver ATRA
109. Ancient fabulist AESOP
111. Straddling ATOP
114. __-weensie EENSIE
118. Composer Boccherini LUIGI
121. Bob Dylan classic, and what this puzzle’s starred clues’ answers’ endings could be BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND
125. Museum Folkwang city ESSEN
126. For keeps, to Keats E’ER
127. Ski patrol, at times RESCUE PARTY
128. 1980 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award recipient SEUSS
129. The “10” in “first and 10”: Abbr. YDS
130. French card game ECARTE
131. Speed Wagons, e.g. REOS

Down
1. Mineralogist Friedrich MOHS
2. Warwickshire river AVON
3. A stet cancels it DELE
4. DJ who first promoted “Weird Al” Yankovic DR DEMENTO
5. City in southern Belarus PINSK
6. MLB VIP Scott Boras, e.g. AGT
7. Question of recognition WHO?
8. Lid malady STYE
9. Long, long time AEON
10. Walk wearily TRUDGE
11. “Phooey!” BAH!
12. “Tyranny and __ are never far apart”: Bentham ANARCHY
13. __ of return RATE
14. Solemnly renounce ABJURE
15. Innocent FREE OF BLAME
16. Cyclades island IOS
17. Hosp. employees RNS
18. PC file extension EXE
20. Writer Ephron et al. NORAS
24. Plum tomatoes ROMAS
29. Raised one’s hand, say VOTED
31. Pitching stat ERA
33. Parrot’s cry AWK!
35. Done in SLAIN
36. Wouk’s mutinied minesweeper CAINE
37. Leers at OGLES
38. Loud bell sounds BONGS
39. Lab slide creature AMOEBA
40. Highland wear TARTAN
42. “I highly doubt that!” AS IF!
43. Start and end of a trademark cartoon credo I YAM
44. Like some poultry stuffing SAGY
45. Apple product IPAD
47. Swaddle ENFOLD
51. Team with the football OFFENSE
53. Anxious med. condition OCD
55. One “trapped by his sinful talk,” in Proverbs EVIL MAN
57. Awe-ful sound? OOH!
58. Armstrong’s carrier LEM
59. Paganini’s hour ORA
60. Caller with a mask UMP
65. Actor Wynn KEENAN
67. Posh prisons, metaphorically GILDED CAGES
68. NPR journalist Shapiro ARI
69. Like Haydn’s “Surprise Symphony” IN G
70. “Go, team!” RAH!
72. NYC airport LGA
73. Withstood ABIDED
74. Natasha __, Boris’ partner in spydom FATALE
77. Mass delivery: Abbr. SER
80. Birthplace of Apollo DELOS
81. Swedish imports SAABS
82. Trip around the world ORBIT
83. Where embryos grow UTERI
84. Ox foot HOOF
85. Underground support ROOT
86. Behind TUSH
87. Blood pigment HEME
88. ’50s conflict KOREAN WAR
90. Is excessively sweet CLOYS
95. Tasted or tested SAMPLED
96. Juvenile newt EFT
97. Cut again RESAW
99. First name at old Notre Dame ARA
102. Geese flocks in flight SKEINS
103. Wear ATTIRE
104. Obnoxious sort CREEP
108. Titter TEHEE
110. Comply OBEY
112. A hundred smackers ONE C
113. Galileo’s birthplace PISA
115. Medieval address SIRE
116. Digging INTO
117. Ice cream name EDY’S
118. “__ Miz” LES
119. Mileage, so to speak USE
120. Pocatello sch. ISU
122. Surg. centers ORS
123. ATM initials NCR
124. Mummy discovered by Howard Carter in 1922 TUT

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6 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 12 Jan 14, Sunday”

  1. Hi Bill and all.
    Chuggin' right along on the top half.
    Got stuck at the LUIGI box.
    Mass delivery: SAS? (self-addressed…no
    And I've never seen ESSEN clued THAT way!
    Fun puzzle, nonetheless.

  2. @Pookie
    Glad you enjoyed the puzzle, and the novel way of cluing the ubiquitous ESSEN. Thanks for answering the question about the "missing" Sunday LA Times puzzle.

    @Anonymous Visitor
    Thanks for asking the question about the Sunday puzzle, and I hope that Pookie's answer explains everything. I usually post an explanation each Sunday as the question is a common one, and today I forgot. All fixed now though!

  3. Bill,
    I just finished the "Storm Front Coming" puzzle. We get them on Thursdays in our company paper in Saudi Arabia.

    I'd like to make a small addition to your commentary on 11 Across:
    11. Dove purchase BAR
    Unilever make a line of personal care products under the brandname “Dove”. The product line includes bars of soap.

    While this is very true, there is another explanation. Dove Bars are a popular line of ice cream. That's what I was thinking of when I entered BAR for 11 across.

    A number of years ago while I was living in the US, I corrected some atrocious English written on the Dove Bar wrapper. The wording was changed shortly thereafter. As I recall, my reward was a coupon for a free package of Dove Bars.

    In any case I suspect that Unilever now sell many more bottles of liquid Dove soap than they do bars.

    Andy Knoedler
    Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

  4. Hi there, Andy.

    Thanks so much for taking the time to correct my interpretation of the clue referencing the Dove Bar. I'm afraid that in the days when I was interested in Dove Bars, I was living on the other side of the Atlantic, where we called the same thing a Choc Ice (a generic term). That's my excuse for making this slip in the original post, which I am now off to fix!

    But, I'd like to thank you even more for the wonderful anecdote about correcting the wording on the Dove Bar wrapper. I wish you would share more information about that. I am sure your editorial services were worth more that a free package of Dove Bars!

    Thanks again, Andy.

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