LA Times Crossword Answers 26 Jan 14, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Mark Feldman
THEME: Just Say No … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase but the with letters NO inserted:

24A. Congressman lacking influence? LEGISLATIVE (NO)BODY
31A. Inexperienced company leader? (NO)VICE PRESIDENT
53A. Conquer one’s Pachelbel addiction? KICK THE CA(NO)N
69A. Flight getting in at 12:00? (NO)ONTIME ARRIVAL
85A. Chamber group income? (NO)NET REVENUE
103A. Promo line for an open wine bar? BOTTOMLESS PI(NO)T
116A. Unimportant orbiter? MI(NO)R SPACE STATION

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … ASHER (Usher), Aalto (Ualto)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Peter who produced James Taylor’s debut album ASHER
Peter and Gordon’s biggest hit is a favorite of mine, “A World Without Love”, written by Paul McCartney. Peter Asher (the “Peter” of Peter and Gordon) had a sister, Jane, who dated Paul McCartney and so they got to sing a lot of his compositions. Asher became a manager and record producer, most notably for James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt.

21. Yam, e.g. TUBER
Although in the US we sometimes refer to sweet potatoes as “yams”, the yam is actually a completely different family of plants. True yams are more common in other parts of the the world than they are in this country, and are especially found in Africa.

22. Time-share unit, often CONDO
The words “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the same type of residential property, a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

30. O. Henry device IRONY
O. Henry was the pen name of writer William Sydney Porter from Greensboro, North Carolina. O. Henry is famous for his witty short stories that have a clever twist in the tail.

49. 1987 Costner role NESS
Eliot Ness was portrayed by Kevin Costner in “The Untouchables” (good movie).

Eliot Ness was the Treasury agent charged with the task of bringing down the notorious Chicago gangster Al Capone. When Ness took on the job in 1930, Chicago law-enforcement agents were renowned for being corrupt, for being on the take. Ness handpicked 50 prohibition agents who he thought he could rely on, later reducing the group to a cadre of 15 and ultimately just 11 trusted men. That group of 11 earned the nickname “The Untouchables”, the agents who couldn’t be bought.

Kevin Costner attributes some of his motivation to pursue an acting career to the great Welsh actor, Richard Burton. Back when Costner was taking acting classes, and was undecided about whether to continue chasing his dream, he ran into Burton on a flight from Puerto Vallarta. Burton agreed to chat with him for a little while, and so Costner was able to ask him if acting meant tolerating the kind of personal drama that had plagued Burton’s own life. Burton told him, “You have green eyes. I have green eyes. I think you’ll be fine”.

50. Slightly, to Salieri POCO
If you’ve seen the brilliant 1984 movie “Amadeus”, you’ll have seen the composer Salieri portrayed as being very envious and resentful of the gifted Mozart. It is no doubt true that two composers fought against each other, at least on occasion, but the extent of the acrimony between the two has perhaps been exaggerated in the interest of theater. Mozart and his wife had six children, but only two survived infancy. The youngest boy was called Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart, born just five months before his father died. Franz was to become a gifted composer, teacher, pianist and conductor, helped along the way by lessons from his father’s supposed rival … Antonio Salieri.

51. Cheerleader’s accessory POMPOM
The French call a ball made of tufted wool a “pompon”, a word that we imported into English directly as “pompon”. We use “pompon” to describe perhaps bobbles on some hats, or the tufted balls that are shaken by cheerleaders at sports events. Over time, the spelling “pompom” has become common in English, probably due to mishearing. To confuse matters a little, we also use the word “pom-pom”, which is a nickname for a British autocannon used mainly as an anti-aircraft weapon, particularly during WWII.

53. Conquer one’s Pachelbel addiction? KICK THE CA(NO)N
Johann Pachelbel was a composer from Germany active in the Baroque Era. Pachelbel’s music was very popular during his own lifetime, and today his best-known work is his “Canon in D”. which has become one of the most popular choices during modern wedding ceremonies.

56. Doe in “Bambi” ENA
The 1942 Disney classic “Bambi” is based on a book written by Felix Salten called “Bambi, A Life in the Woods”. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

62. “Smokey and the Bandit” city TEXARKANA
Texarkana is the name given to the twin cities of Texarkana, Texas and Texarkana, Arkansas that sit either side of the state line between Texas and Arkansas. The name of “Texarkana” was given when the settlement was founded at the junction of two railroads in 1873. Back then, it was believed that the new city would be not only on the borders of Texas (TEX) and Arkansas (ARK) but also on the border of Louisiana (ANA), giving the city its name. The Louisiana state line was eventually set about 30 miles away, but the -ANA suffix was retained.

“Smokey and the Bandit” is a 1977 comedy action film starring Burt Reynolds as “the Bandit” and Jackie Gleason as “Smokey Bear”.

68. Tart fruits SLOES
The sloe is the fruit of the blackthorn bush.

72. Santa ___ MARIA
When Columbus made his famous voyage of discovery, the largest of his three ships was the Santa Maria. The Santa Maria ran aground on the coast of Hispaniola on Christmas Day in 1492 and was lost. 39 of Columbus’s men were left behind with the permission of the locals. These men stripped the timbers from the Santa Maria and used them to build a settlement they called La Navidad (Spanish for “Christmas”). La Navidad is now the modern town of Môle-Saint-Nicolas in the Republic of Haiti.

75. “Oklahoma!” aunt ELLER
“Oklahoma!” was the first musical written by the great duo Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. The storyline comes from a 1931 stage play called “Green Grow the Lilacs”.

80. Ukrainian port ODESSA
The city of Odessa (also “Odesa”) in Ukraine was founded relatively recently, in 1794 by Catherine the Great. The city was originally meant to be called Odessos after an ancient Greek city believed to have been located nearby. Catherine liked the way the locals pronounced the name as “Odessa” and so went with the less Greek-sounding name.

85. Chamber group income? (NO)NET REVENUE
A nonet is group composed of nine instruments or voices.

89. Bland stuff PABLUM
“Pablum” is an infant food made from processed cereal that was introduced by the Mead Johnson Company in 1931. The brand name “Pablum” is a shortened version of the Latin “pubulum” meaning “foodstuff”. The term “pablum” has entered the language and describes something bland and unappetizing.

98. __ Aviv TEL
The full name of Israel’s second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into “Spring Mound”, a name chosen in 1910.

99. FDR’s mother SARA
Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) was the only child of Sara Delano and James Roosevelt Sr. The Delano family history in America goes back to the pilgrim Philippe de Lannoy, an immigrant of Flemish descent who arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621. The family name “de Lannoy” was anglicized here in the US, to “Delano”.

102. Keats creations ODES
The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

103. Promo line for an open wine bar? BOTTOMLESS PI(NO)T
The Pinot noir wine grape variety takes its name from the French for “pine” and “black”. The grapes grow in tight clusters shaped like pine cones, and are very dark in color. The Pinot noir grape is most closely associated with Burgundy wines in France, although in recent years the popularity (and price) of California Pinot noir wine has soared after it featured so prominently in the wonderful, wonderful 2004 movie “Sideways”. Grab a bottle of Pinot, and go rent the DVD…

109. Slow movement LARGO
Largo is a instruction to play a piece of music with a very slow tempo. “Largo” is the Italian word for “broadly”.

116. Unimportant orbiter? MI(NO)R SPACE STATION
The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001.

127. Colorado resort ASPEN
Aspen, Colorado used to be known as Ute City, with the name change taking place in 1880. Like many communities in the area, Aspen was a mining town, and in 1891 and 1892 it was at the center of the highest production of silver in the US. Nowadays of course, it’s all about skiing and movie stars.

128. Bugs’ nemesis ELMER
Elmer Fudd is one of the most famous of all the Looney Tunes cartoon characters, the hapless nemesis of Bugs Bunny. If you have never seen it, check out Elmer and Bugs in the marvelous “Rabbit of Seville”, a short cartoon that parodies Rossini’s “Barber of Seville”. Wonderful stuff …

Down
1. Thor’s father ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin’s wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term “Friday” (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin’s son was Thor, and his name gave us the term “Thursday”.

4. Finnish architect Alvar __ AALTO
Alvar Aalto was a Finnish architect and designer. He did most of his work in the first half of the twentieth century, and earned himself the nickname of “Father of Modernism” in Finland and the rest of the Nordic countries.

7. “___ tu”: Verdi aria ERI
The aria “Eri tu” is from Verdi’s opera “Un ballo in maschera” (A Masked Ball). The opera tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden during a masked ball.

9. Oldest Beatle STARR
Ringo Starr’s real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles (replacing drummer Pete Best), Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name “Ringo Starr”, because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded “cowboyish”. Back then his drum solos were billed as “Starr Time”.

11. Kimono sash OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

The lovely Japanese kimono is a garment worn by men, women and children. The word “kimono” translates simply as “thing to wear”, with “ki” meaning “wear” and “mono” meaning “thing”.

15. Automaton ROBOT
Karel Čapek was a Czech writer noted for his works of science fiction. Čapek’s 1920 play “R.U.R.” is remembered in part for introducing the world to the word “robot”. The words “automaton” and “android” were already in use, but Capek gave us “robot” from the original Czech “robota” meaning “forced labor”. The acronym “R.U.R.”, in the context of the play, stands for “Rossum’s Universal Robots”.

18. Tofu base SOY
Tofu is another name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that … bean that has “curdled”. Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it …

26. Ratings giver NIELSEN
Arthur Nielsen founded his Nielsen Media Research company to track brand advertising. He quickly moved into market analysis of radio audiences in the thirties, and today the company is famous for tracking television audiences. I remember watching the last episode of the TV series “Becker”, in which Ted Danson played a doctor. Given that the show had been ordered off the air, there’s a great line in the last episode when Becker asks for the chart of a patient called “Nielsen”. He looks at the lab results and announces “I don’t know what everyone is talking about … these numbers aren’t so bad!” Great stuff …

34. “New Jack City” actor ICE-T
Rapper Ice-T must be sick of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles. Maybe he should have stuck to his real name, Tracy Marrow? Then again, maybe not … Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about break-dancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

36. 10th century French king CAPET
Hugh Capet was the first King of the Franks, and the founder of the Capetian dynasty that still exists today. Hugh Capet ruled France from 987 until his death in 996. King juan Carlos of Spain is a member of the Capetian family.

38. Big name in real estate RE/MAX
RE/MAX is an international real estate company headquartered in Denver, Colorado. The name RE/MAX stands for “real estate maximum”, and the company’s logo is a hot air balloon with RE/MAX emblazoned on it.

41. Sonata section RONDO
A rondo was often chosen by composers in the classical period for the last movement of a sonata (or symphony or concerto, for that matter). In rondo form there is a principal theme that alternates with a contrasting theme(s). So, the original theme anchors the whole piece in between secondary digressions.

The term “sonata” comes from the Latin and Italian word “sonare” meaning “to sound”. A sonata is a piece of music that is played, as opposed to a cantata (from Latin and Italian “cantare” meaning “to sing”), a piece of music that is sung.

47. Hosp. test EKG
An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

50. Spanish dish PAELLA
Paella is sometime referred to as the Spanish national dish, but not by Spaniards. In Spain, paella is regarded as a typical regional dish from Valencia.

52. Deadly shark MAKO
The shortfin mako shark can appear on restaurant menus, and as a result the species is dying out in some parts of the world. The mako gets its own back sometimes though, and attacks on humans are not unknown. And the shark in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea”, that’s a mako.

54. Mrs. Dithers in “Blondie” CORA
“Blondie” was created as a comic strip by Chic Young. It was first published in 1930, and is still being created today (although the strip is now controlled by Chic’s son, Dean). The strip spawned a series of radio programs (1939-1950) and a series of Blondie films (1938-1950). Blondie is married to Dagwood Bumstead. Dagwood slaves away at a construction company run by Julius Dithers, whose wife is called Cora. Another famous character in the strip is Elmo Tuttle, a pesky neighborhood kid who is always bugging Dagwood.

55. Special delivery? CESAREAN
The story that Julius Caesar was born via a Caesarean section seems be unfounded. Although such procedures were indeed carried out in Ancient Rome there are no reports of the mother surviving (and Julius Caesar’s mother did raise her child).

58. Classic Welles role KANE
“Citizen Kane” was the first film made by Orson Welles, one considered by many to be the finest film ever made. It’s a remarkable achievement by Wells, as he played the lead, and also produced and directed. Despite all the accolades for “Citizen Kane” over the decades, the movie was far from a commercial success in its early run and actually lost money at the box office.

59. Part of IBM: Abbr. INTL
IBM was founded as the Tabulating Machine Company in 1896. The company changed its name to the Computing Tabulating Recording Corporation (CTR) in 1911 and was listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1916. The name of International Business Machines (IBM) was given first to the company’s Canadian subsidiary, and then its South American subsidiary. In 1924, it was decided to adopt the International Business Machines name for the whole company. Good choice …

65. Heraldic border ORLE
In heraldry, an orle is a decorative band that lies close to the edge of the front-surface of a shield. With such a design, the orle necessarily takes on the shape of the shield.

66. Setting for Camus’ “The Plague” ORAN
“The Plague” is a novel by Albert Camus, first published in 1947. It is set in the Algerian port of Oran during a terrible plague.

Oran lies on the Algerian coast, and is famous for being the port where the French Navy was largely destroyed by the British during WWII in order to avoid the French vessels falling into the hands of Nazi Germany after France surrendered. This decisive and unexpected unilateral action by the British sent a very strong message around the world that Britain was willing to fight alone against the axis powers if necessary.

67. Ancient Celt PICT
The Picts were a Celtic people who lived in ancient Scotland, in the east and north of the country. The Picts gradually disappeared as an identifiable group, merging with the Gaels in the 10th century.

71. Nixon, in the ’50s VEEP
Richard Milhous Nixon (RMN) was US Vice President under President Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE).

Journalist Jeffrey Frank just published what looks like an interesting book called “Ike and Dick: Portrait of a Strange Political Marriage”. Frank makes the case that Eisenhower really didn’t choose Nixon as a running mate in 1952, but that Nixon was chosen for him in some smoke-filled backroom in that way that such decisions were made back then. Eisenhower was a national war hero, and Nixon was noted back then as being an active and successful anti-Communist. The party elders thought that they would make a perfect ticket.

72. “Haystacks” series painter MONET
The Impressionist painter Claude Monet made a whole series of paintings featuring haystacks. There are a total of 25 canvases titled “Haystacks” that Monet painted between 1890 and 1891 near his home in Giverny in France.

Claude Monet painted the harbor of Le Havre in the north of France in 1872, giving it the title “Impression, Sunrise”. The painting is not a “realistic” representation of the scene in front of him, hence the name “impression”. It was this very painting that gave rise to the name of the Impressionist movement.

79. Field protectors DOMES
I think the idea is that some sports fields are protected by domes.

81. British bluebloods, informally ARISTOS
“Aristo” is short for “aristocrat”.

86. Part of Q.E.D. ERAT
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

87. ___ Beach, Fla. VERO
Vero Beach, Florida was the home of spring training for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers from 1948 to 2008 (after which the team moved spring training to Arizona).

90. Regional life BIOTA
The biota of a region is the total collection of flora and fauna found there.

96. Isotope of hydrogen TRITIUM
There are three naturally occurring isotopes of hydrogen. The most common isotope is what we ordinarily refer to as hydrogen, and it has no neutrons. This particular isotope is sometimes called “protium”. The isotope with one neutron is called “deuterium”. When paired with two atoms of oxygen, deuterium forms “heavy water”. The hydrogen isotope with two neutrons is called “tritium”. Tritium is radioactive, with a half-life of 12.3 years.

105. Feudal lord LIEGE
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. “Liege” was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

106. City near Düsseldorf ESSEN
The city of Düsseldorf lies in the west of Germany, fairly close to the border with France, and sits on the River Rhine.

110. Before long ANON
“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

116. Stir-fry additive MSG
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

117. Actress Zadora PIA
Pia Zadora is an American actress and singer. Zadora’s most famous role was in the 1982 film “Butterfly” in which she worked with Orson Welles and Stacey Keach. The film was based on the novel “The Butterfly” by James M. Cain and deals with the difficult subject of father-daughter incest.

118. Morning hrs. AMS
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

120. Singer Bachman TAL
Tal Bachman is a Canadian singer-songwriter who lives on Vancouver Island. Tal is the son of Randy Bachman, of Bachman-Turner Overdrive fame.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Paddle OAR
4. Peter who produced James Taylor’s debut album ASHER
9. Stash STORE
14. Old Dodge ARIES
19. Pair DUO
20. Now, in Spain AHORA
21. Yam, e.g. TUBER
22. Time-share unit, often CONDO
23. Investment adviser’s suggestion, for short IRA
24. Congressman lacking influence? LEGISLATIVE NOBODY
27. Where you might see “Hello” NAMETAG
29. Take on HIRE
30. O. Henry device IRONY
31. Inexperienced company leader? NOVICE PRESIDENT
36. Wit CARD
39. Those, in Spain ESOS
40. Myth ending -ICAL
41. __ room REC
44. Really enjoyed ATE UP
46. __ room HOTEL
49. 1987 Costner role NESS
50. Slightly, to Salieri POCO
51. Cheerleader’s accessory POMPOM
53. Conquer one’s Pachelbel addiction? KICK THE CANON
56. Doe in “Bambi” ENA
57. Becoming fond of TAKING TO
61. Rib NEEDLE
62. “Smokey and the Bandit” city TEXARKANA
64. Scout group TROOP
68. Tart fruits SLOES
69. Flight getting in at 12:00? NOONTIME ARRIVAL
72. Santa ___ MARIA
75. “Oklahoma!” aunt ELLER
76. Gashed LACERATED
80. Ukrainian port ODESSA
82. Teacher’s concern ABSENTEE
84. Altar vow I DO
85. Chamber group income? NONET REVENUE
89. Bland stuff PABLUM
91. Significant periods ERAS
92. Angry IRED
93. Scrawny GAUNT
97. Family member NIECE
98. __ Aviv TEL
99. FDR’s mother SARA
100. They’re expected PARS
102. Keats creations ODES
103. Promo line for an open wine bar? BOTTOMLESS PINOT
109. Slow movement LARGO
111. “You really think that’s true?” IS IT?
112. At TOWARDS
116. Unimportant orbiter? MINOR SPACE STATION
121. See 122-Across OUT
122. With 121-Across, force from hiding SMOKE
123. Persona IMAGE
124. First-aid kit item GAUZE
125. Half and half ONE
126. Some are dominant GENES
127. Colorado resort ASPEN
128. Bugs’ nemesis ELMER
129. Not many FEW

Down
1. Thor’s father ODIN
2. Ghostly glow AURA
3. Gad about ROAM
4. Finnish architect Alvar __ AALTO
5. Bundle, as wheat SHEAVE
6. Greedy HOGGISH
7. “___ tu”: Verdi aria ERI
8. Most daring RASHEST
9. Oldest Beatle STARR
10. One in a class by himself? TUTEE
11. Kimono sash OBI
12. Gun REV
13. Before, in poems ERE
14. __ squash ACORN
15. Automaton ROBOT
16. Part of, plotwise IN ON
17. Whirlpool EDDY
18. Tofu base SOY
25. Sass LIP
26. Ratings giver NIELSEN
28. Eventually become END UP
32. Gentle sound COO
33. Ruin SINK
34. “New Jack City” actor ICE-T
35. Short run DASH
36. 10th century French king CAPET
37. Make amends ATONE
38. Big name in real estate RE/MAX
41. Sonata section RONDO
42. Pierre’s school ECOLE
43. Scoop holders CONES
45. Hearty entrée POT ROAST
47. Hosp. test EKG
48. One who more than just trash-talks? LITTERBUG
50. Spanish dish PAELLA
52. Deadly shark MAKO
54. Mrs. Dithers in “Blondie” CORA
55. Special delivery? CESAREAN
58. Classic Welles role KANE
59. Part of IBM: Abbr. INTL
60. Clinch NAIL
63. Liqueur flavorings ANISES
65. Heraldic border ORLE
66. Setting for Camus’ “The Plague” ORAN
67. Ancient Celt PICT
70. Average MEAN
71. Nixon, in the ’50s VEEP
72. “Haystacks” series painter MONET
73. Be gaga over ADORE
74. Kind of artery RENAL
77. Did floor work TILED
78. Draw out EDUCE
79. Field protectors DOMES
81. British bluebloods, informally ARISTOS
83. Vast amount SEA
86. Part of Q.E.D. ERAT
87. ___ Beach, Fla. VERO
88. Wax-wrapped cheese EDAM
90. Regional life BIOTA
94. Steal the spotlight from UPSTAGE
95. Drop off NAP
96. Isotope of hydrogen TRITIUM
101. Drop off SNOOZE
103. Penniless BROKE
104. Fairy tale baddies OGRES
105. Feudal lord LIEGE
106. City near Düsseldorf ESSEN
107. Pose SIT
108. One with a title OWNER
109. Green shade LIME
110. Before long ANON
113. It may be 77-Down ROOF
114. Buggy site DUNE
115. Brood STEW
116. Stir-fry additive MSG
117. Actress Zadora PIA
118. Morning hrs. AMS
119. Cover CAP
120. Singer Bachman TAL

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3 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 26 Jan 14, Sunday”

  1. Hi Bill and everyone.
    Yesterday was diabolical for me.
    Today I was on no one's wavelength.
    ASHER/AALTO total unknowns.
    Wearied of trying to figure out theme answers. I'm going to set a time limit on Sat. and Sun.
    Not on Merl's wavelength either.
    Oh well, I'll try again.

  2. Hi there, Pookie.

    Those ASHER and AALTO answers crossing each other were my downfall to. I was left having to guess, and of course guessed wrong.

    A breezy Monday coming up for you, I am sure 🙂

  3. You know, Bill the funny thing about Sundays, is it starts out so promising, and then WHAM!
    Gee, I thought I was going pretty well.
    Saturdays are just a "no foothold" situation.
    Guess you'll never see me at any tournament.
    Yes tomorrow IS Monday!

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