LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Jul 13, Sunday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Matt Skoczen
THEME: Border States … the opening and closing pairs of letters in today’s themed answers are circled in the grid, and are two-letter abbreviations for US states. And, as pointed out by Addict in a comment below, the US states in each answer do in fact share geographical borders:

24A. Land on the Red Sea ARABIAN PENINSULA
39A. Eponymous Italian educator MARIA MONTESSORI
57A. Time Warner, to CNN PARENT COMPANY
87A. Periodic “Top Chef” judge with a restaurant in Manhattan WYLIE DUFRESNE
104A. Rioter’s weapon MOLOTOV COCKTAIL
122A. Macro, e.g. COMPUTER SHORTCUT
3D. She voiced Princess Fiona in “Shrek” CAMERON DIAZ
75D. Under-the-hood cleaner WASHER FLUID

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 49s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4 … WYLIE DUFRESNE (Wylie Lefresne), OTRA (tera), DODO (dolt!), LUTSK (Leesk)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
5. Orange County city ANAHEIM
The city of Anaheim was founded back in 1857 by Bavarian grape farmers and winemakers. The name of the city is a melding of “Ana” (after the nearby Santa Ana River) and “heim” (a common suffix in German place names derived from “home”). So, the name “Anaheim” might translate to “Home by the Santa Ana River”.

19. Algerian seaport ORAN
Oran lies on the Algerian coast, and is famous for being the port where the French Navy was largely destroyed by the British during WWII in order to avoid the French vessels falling into the hands of Nazi Germany after France surrendered. This decisive and unexpected unilateral action by the British sent a very strong message around the world that Britain was willing to fight alone against the axis powers if necessary.

20. Brand formerly marketed as Philishave outside the U.S. NORELCO
Norelco is a brand of shavers and personal care products made by Philips. The brand name was introduced as the company was barred from using “Philips” in the US in the early 1940s. The name Norelco was chosen as an acronym for “NOR-th American Philips EL-ectrical CO-mpany.

21. __-mutuel PARI
Parimutuel betting is a system in which the bookmaker is guaranteed a pre-determined profit. In the system, all bets are pooled, taxes and house profit are removed, and the payoff is made with the resulting pool. In some parts of the world the parimutuel system is referred to as the Tote (as indeed it is in Ireland).

24. Land on the Red Sea ARABIAN PENINSULA
The Arabian Peninsula (also “Arabia”) is part of Western Asia that is located just north-east of Africa. The peninsula is bordered to the west by the Red Sea, to the northeast by the Persian Gulf, and to the southeast by the Indian Ocean. Most of the Arabian Peninsula is taken up by Saudi Arabia, but also included are Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen.

29. Homeowner’s burden LIEN
A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid.

30. They include skateboarding and snowboarding X GAMES
The X Games are annual events, with a Summer X Games held every year as well as a Winter X Games. It’s very much a commercial venture, with all aspects controlled by the TV station ESPN. The games focus on extreme action sports, like skateboarding and freestyle motocross in the summer and various extreme snowboarding events in the winter.

31. “__ Angel”: doo-wop classic EARTH
“Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)” was originally recorded by the Penguins in 1954, and then was a big hit for the Crew-Cuts the following year, in 1955. Famously, it was played at the high school dance scene in the very entertaining movie “Back to the Future”, from 1985 starring Michael J. Fox. In the film, the song was performed by the fictional group, Marvin Berry and the Starlighters.

36. Genus subdivision SPECIES
Biological classification is a method used to group organisms by biological type. The method uses a hierarchy of nested classes, with an organism being classified with reference to evolutionary traits. The major taxonomic ranks used are:

– Life
– Domain
– Kingdom
– Phylum
– Class
– Order
– Family
– Genus
– Species

39. Eponymous Italian educator MARIA MONTESSORI
The Montessori approach to education was developed by the Italian educator Maria Montessori in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The Montessori system arrived in the US in 1911, but most classes were shut down by 1914 due to unfavorable criticism from the established education system. There was a revival in interest in the US starting in 1960 and now there are thousands of schools using the Montessori approach all over the country.

44. Yule quenchers NOGS
It’s not really clear where the term “nog” comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

“Yule” celebrations coincide with Christmas, and the words “Christmas” and “Yule” have become synonymous in much of the world. However, Yule was originally a pagan festival celebrated by Germanic peoples. The name “Yule” comes from the Old Norse word “jol” that was used to describe the festival.

46. Ben Gurion airline EL AL
Ben-Gurion International is Israel’s main airport, and is located in the city of Lod just a few miles southeast of Tel Aviv. The airport is named for David Ben-Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister.

47. ’60s activist gp. SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

49. Laura Bush’s birth city MIDLAND
Midland, Texas was founded as a city in 1881 as the midway point between Fort Worth and El Paso on the Texas and Pacific Railroad. Midland is noted in recent years as the birth city of former First Lady Laura Bush, as well as being former home to both President George W. Bush and President George H. W. Bush and their families.

52. Turow work about first-year law students ONE L
While “One L” is a name used in general for first year law students, “One L” is also the title of an autobiographical narrative by author Scott Turow, telling of his experiences as a first year student at Harvard Law School.

62. Driller’s deg. DDS
Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)

65. Sling spirits GIN
A sling is a cocktail made of brandy, whiskey or gin, that is sweetened and flavored with lemon. The most famous version of the sling is the Singapore Sling, invented by a bartender at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. I am proud to report that I once had a Singapore Sling in Raffles Hotel, many moons ago …

68. Driver’s license word, maybe HAZEL
Hazel eyes are a combination of brown and green.

70. “Horton Hears a Who!” villain VLAD
Horton the elephant turns up in two books by Dr. Seuss, “Horton Hatches the Egg” and “Horton Hears a Who!”

73. “Don’t change that” STET
“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

74. New Zealand exports KIWIS
What we call kiwifruit today used to be called a Chinese gooseberry. Marketing folks in the fifties decided to call it a “melonette”, and then New Zealand producers adopted the name “kiwifruit”.

78. Wrongly left the base GONE AWOL
The Military Police (MPs) are concerned with personnel who go AWOL (Absent WithOut Leave).

81. Russian fighter MIG
The Russian fighter jets that we know as “MiGs” are so called because they were designed by the Mikoyan-and-Gurevich Design Bureau, and MiG is an acronym for “Mikoyan-and-Gurevich” in Russian.

87. Periodic “Top Chef” judge with a restaurant in Manhattan WYLIE DUFRESNE
Wylie Dufresne is a celebrity chef from Providence, Rhode Island who owns the wd~50 molecular gastronomy restaurant in Manhattan, New York City. Molecular gastronomy is a modern cooking style that makes use of physical and chemical transformations in ingredients while cooking.

91. Wee SMA’
The Scots dialect word sma’ means “small”. The word famously appears in the Robert Burns poem, “To a Mouse”. The pertinent lines read:

A daimen icker in a thrave
’S a sma’ request;
I’ll get a blessin wi’ the lave,
An’ never miss’t!

which “translates” to:

An occasional ear of corn out of twenty-four sheaves
Is a small request;
I’ll be blest with the rest of the corn,
And never miss the ear you took!

92. Orbital extreme APOGEE
In the celestial world, an apsis is a point in an orbit when the orbiting body is at its greatest, or least, distance from it’s center of orbit. The farthest and closest points of orbit are known as the apogee and perigee, when talking about bodies orbiting the Earth. The farthest and closest points for bodies orbiting the sun are known as the aphelion and perihelion.

94. Una y __ vez: time after time OTRA
“Una y otra vez” is Spanish for “again and again”.

97. Golfer Aoki ISAO
Isao Aoki is one of Japan’s greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. Aoki’s best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

98. Yukon winter hrs. PST
Canada’s federal territory known as Yukon takes its name from the Yukon River. “Yukon” means “Big Stream” in the local Gwich’in language.

Canada is made up of ten provinces and three territories. The three territories lie to the north of the country, and are Yukon, Northwest Territories (NWT) and Nunavut. Territories differ from provinces in that they only have governmental powers that are delegated to them by the federal government, whereas the provinces have constitutional powers in their own right.

104. Rioter’s weapon MOLOTOV COCKTAIL
Vyacheslav Molotov was a prominent Soviet politician and protégé of Joseph Stalin. During the Winter War of WWII, between the Soviet Union and Finland, Molotov claimed in radio broadcasts that Finland was not being bombed, but rather that the Soviet Union was dropping food to relieve famine. With a sense of irony, the Finns started to call the Soviet bombs “Molotov bread baskets”. The Finns also improvised incendiary bombs using bottles and a gasoline-based fuel, and called these devices “Molotov cocktails”, a name that persists to this day.

109. City on the Po TURIN
Turin (“Torino” in Italian) is a major city in the north of Italy that sits on the Po River. Back in 1861, when the Kingdom of Italy was formed, Turin was chosen as the first capital of the country .

112. California city associated with the founding of Hells Angels FONTANA
The Hells Angels Motorcycle Club was founded by Scottish-American war immigrants in 1948. The founders were members of the Bishop family of Fontana, California. Today, the Hells Angels are listed as an organized crime syndicate by the US Department of Justice.

113. Normandy river ORNE
Orne is a department and river in the northwest of France. Perhaps one of the most famous locations in Orne is the village of Camembert, the home of the famous (and delicious!) cheese.

120. Ford and others GERALDS
President Gerald Ford was well known for his athletic prowess. He was the star football player both in his high school and later at the University of Michigan. After graduation, President Ford received two offers to play in the NFL, from the Detroit Lions and the Green Bay Packers. He turned down both teams opting instead to take a coaching position at Yale giving him the opportunity to apply to Yale Law School. But young Mr. Ford’s plan backfired as Yale Law School turned him down because of his full-time commitment to sports: coaching football, boxing and teaching JV cheer-leading. It took three years for President Ford to make it into Yale Law School, but he finally got there, in 1938.

127. Bedtime in Burgundy NUIT
The Burgundy region of France is famous for its wine production. If you’re looking at a label that isn’t translated into English though, you’ll see Burgundy written in French, namely “Bourgogne”.

128. Music-licensing org. BMI
ASCAP (the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) collects licence fees for musicians and distributes royalties to composers whose works have been performed. BMI (Broadcast Music Incorporated) provides the same service.

129. Affectedly quaint, in Colchester TWEE
In the UK, something “twee” is cutesy or overly nice. “Twee” came from “tweet”, which is the cutesy, baby-talk way of saying “sweet”.

Colchester is a town in the county of Essex in England, found just over 50 miles to the northeast of London. Someone from Colchester is known as a Colcestrian.

134. Taboo NOT DONE
The word “taboo” was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book “A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean”. Cook described “tabu” (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

135. River in central Germany EDER
The Eder is a river in Germany, a tributary of the Fulda River. The Eder has a dam near the small town of Waldeck which holds water in the large Edersee reservoir. This was one of the dams that was attacked by the RAF during WWII with the famous Barnes Wallis bouncing bombs. It was destroyed in the Dam Busters raid in 1943, but rebuilt the same year.

Down
1. Linzer treats TORTES
A Linzer Torte is a torte with a lattice design on the top of the pastry. The torte is named for the Austrian city of Linz.

2. Biblical landfall ARARAT
Mount Ararat is in Turkey. Ararat is a snow-capped dormant volcano with two peaks. The higher of the two, Greater Ararat, is the tallest peak in the country. Ararat takes its name from a legendary Armenian hero called Ara the Beautiful (or Ara the Handsome). According to the Book of Genesis, Noah’s ark landed on Mount Ararat as the Great Flood subsided.

3. She voiced Princess Fiona in “Shrek” CAMERON DIAZ
The Hollywood actress Cameron Diaz started out her professional life as a model. Diaz’s first acting role was in the 1994 film “The Mask”, starring alongside Jim Carrey.

Princess Fiona is the love interest in the “Shrek” series of films.

Before “Shrek” was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children’s picture book called “Shrek!” authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title “Shrek!” came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning “fear” or “terror”.

7. Altar constellation ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for “altar”.

9. Actor Wallach ELI
Eli Wallach has been appearing consistently and making great performances on the big and small screens since the 1950s. Wallach’s most famous role was probably as “the Ugly” in “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”. More recently he gave a very strong performance in 2006’s “The Holiday”.

11. Philosophy espousing a single reality MONISM
Monism is the philosophy that many apparent disparate objects and views, can in fact be unified. For example, Although the universe appears to made of so may stars and planets, a monist would point out it is just one universe. A monist may argue in the field of religion that there really is only one God, and that the deities worshiped in various religions are just manifestations of that one God.

14. Upstairs neighbor of Ralph and Alice TRIXIE
In “The Honeymooners”, Jackie Gleason’s character was married to Alice Kramden who was played originally by Pert Kelton, but ultimately by Audrey Meadows. Art Carney’s character was married to Thelma “Trixie” Norton, played originally by Elaine Stritch, and then by Joyce Randolph.

16. “Queen Zixi of Ix” author BAUM
“Queen Zixi of Ix” is a children’s book written by L. Frank Baum, the author of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. Both books are in his “Oz Series”. The regions of Noland and Ix are neighbors of the Land of Oz.

25. Gourd fruits PEPOS
“Pepos” are the fruits of several plants, all with leathery rinds, fleshy pulp and flattened seeds. Examples are cantaloupes. watermelons, cucumbers, and pumpkins.

33. Captain Kidd’s negative NAE
William Kidd was a Scottish privateer who went by the name “Captain Kidd”. Although Kidd was a privateer, someone authorized by the government to attack foreign shipping, he was eventually arrested and executed for piracy. There is common opinion held today that the charges against Kidd were actually trumped up. Captain Kidd’s story was the basis of a 1945 film called “Captain Kidd” starring Charles Laughton in the title role. Laughton also appeared as Captain Kidd in 1952’s comic movie “Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd”.

34. DuPont acrylic ORLON
Orlon is the brand name used by the DuPont Corporation for the acrylic fibers the company developed in 1941.

35. Cheerful RIANT
“Riant” is such a lovely word, I think, meaning cheerful, laughing and full of mirth. “Riant” comes into English directly from French, the past participle of “rire” meaning “to laugh”.

37. Amt. after a period CTS
The reference is to cents (cts.), which come beside a decimal point in sums expressed in dollars and cents.

40. Smart ones? ALECS
Apparently the original “smart Alec” was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

42. Stamp on a packing list RECD
Received (recd.)

49. Sour __ MASH
Sour mash is a whiskey that is distilled using mash from a previous batch to start fermentation. The sour mash process is analogous to the process used to make sourdough bread.

50. Worshipper of the sun god Inti INCA
Inti was the sun god worshiped by the Incas. Images depicting Inti are featured on the national flags of several nations, including Argentina and Uruguay.

54. CN Tower prov. ONT
When I last took the elevator to the top of the CN Tower in Toronto back in the eighties, it was the tallest freestanding structure in the world. It lost that title in 2007 during the construction of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the building which still has that honor. The CN Tower was built by the railway company Canadian National, which gave it the name. Since Canadian National sold the tower in 1995, it has been known as Canada’s National Tower, although I don’t think many people worry about what the CN stands for!

55. Stooge chuckle NYUK
Nyuk nyuk!

If you’ve seen a few of the films starring “The Three Stooges” you’ll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as “Moe, Larry and Shemp”. Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, “Moe, Larry And Curly”. Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then “Curly-Joe” DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

58. Zhou of China ENLAI
Zhou Enlai (also Chou En-Lai) was the first government leader of the People’s Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon’s famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

59. He played Clubber Lang in “Rocky III” MR T
Mr. T’s real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie “Rocky III”. In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, “No, I don’t hate Balboa, but I pity the fool”. He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called “I Pity the Fool”, and produced a motivational video called “Be Somebody … or Be Somebody’s Fool!”.

60. Vichy verse POEME
Vichy is a spa town in the center of France. The people from Vichy are known as Vichyssois. After Paris, was occupied by the Germans in WWII, Vichy was chosen as the seat of government for what was called the French State. The Vichy government had theoretical authority even in occupied France, and is remembered for its collaboration with the German authorities. Vichy was chosen as the new seat of government because of its relative proximity to Paris, and simply because the town had the largest hotel room capacity in the “free zone” of the country.

61. Temple Grandin’s disorder AUTISM
Temple Grandin is a professor at Colorado State University and a doctor of animal science. Grandin was diagnosed with autism in 1949 when she was 2 years old. She is the subject of an excellent HBO biographical movie called “Temple Grandin” that was released in 2010.

69. Actor Rob LOWE
The actor Rob Lowe is one of the “founding members” of the so-called Brat Pack, having appeared in the movie “St. Elmo’s Fire”. He is currently playing a regular character on the TV show “Parks and Recreation”. My favorite of his roles though, was playing Sam Seaborn on Aaron Sorkin’s great drama series “The West Wing”. When “The West Wing” first aired, Seaborn was billed as the show’s main character, but outstanding performances from the rest of the cast and some great writing meant that Lowe’s role became “one of many”. This led to some dissatisfaction on Lowe’s part, and eventually he quit the show.

76. Culinary author Rombauer IRMA
Irma Rombauer was the author of the famous cookbook “The Joy Of Cooking”. Rombauer self-published the book back in 1931 in St. Louis, Missouri. She and her family continued to publish privately as demand was high, and then a commercial printing house picked it up in 1936. “The Joy of Cooking” has been in print continuously ever since.

79. TV’s “Science Guy” NYE
That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on Disney for 4 years from 1993-97. I was surprised to learn that Bill Nye was married briefly to Blair Tindall, the author of “Mozart in the Jungle”. That’s a great book, if anyone is interested …

80. Ukraine city LUTSK
Lutsk is in north-western Ukraine, and sits on the Styr River. The river may have given the city it’s name, as one theory is that “Lutzk” comes from the old Slavic word “luka” meaning “a bend in a river”. The city was the center of the Battle of Lutsk during WWI, in June 1916, when the Russians took the city out of the hands of the Austrian-Hungarian forces.

85. __ facto IPSO
“Ipso facto” is Latin, meaning “by the fact itself”. Ipso facto describes something that is a direct consequence of particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen (“not” ipso facto).

88. It can be dipped in dip FRITO
The Frito Corporation was started in 1932 by Elmer Doolin, basically in his mother’s kitchen. Doolin paid $100 for a corn chip recipe from a local restaurant and started producing Fritos at the rate of 10 pounds per day.

96. Allstate online subsidiary ESURANCE
Esurance is a provider of auto insurance direct to customers online and over the phone. Esurance is now owned by Allstate.

99. Like Capone’s face SCARRED
When Al Capone was a young man, he worked as a bouncer in nightclubs and saloons. He was working the door of a Brooklyn night spot one evening when he apparently insulted a woman, sparking off a fight with her brother. In the tussle, Capone’s face was slashed three times. Capone wasn’t too proud of the incident, nor the “Scarface” moniker. He always hid the scars as best he could when being photographed, and was also fond of telling people that the scars were from old war wounds.

102. A, in Augsburg EIN
Augsburg is a city in Bavaria, Germany. Augsburg was founded in 15 BC, making it the third oldest city in the whole country.

105. From soup __ TO NUTS
The American expression “from soup to nuts” means “from beginning to end”. The idiom comes from the description of a full course dinner, with soup to start and nuts as a dessert.

108. “Earthsea” series author Ursula LEGUIN
Ursula Leguin is an American author of fantasy and science fiction books and short stories.

115. SALT weapon ICBM
An Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) is a ballistic missile with the range necessary to cross between continents. Being ballistic (as opposed to a cruise missile) an ICBM is guided during the initial launch phase, but later in flight just relies on thrust and gravity to arrive at its target. It is defined as intercontinental as it has a range greater that 3,500 miles. ICBMs are really only used for delivering nuclear warheads. Scary stuff …

There were two rounds of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks between the US and the Soviet Union, and two resulting treaties (SALT I & SALT II). The opening round of SALT I talks were held in Helsinki as far back as 1970.

116. NYC cultural center MOMA
The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA’s sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

117. International Year of Astronomy year MMIX
The year 2009 was chosen as the International Year of Astronomy as it was the 400th anniversary of the astronomical observations made using a telescope by Galileo.

119. Dog who reveals he can speak in “Tik-Tok of Oz” TOTO
Toto is Dorothy’s dog in the film “The Wizard of Oz”. Toto was played by a dog called Terry, but Terry’s name was soon changed to Toto in real life, due to the success of the film.

123. Sushi selection EEL
Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If you want raw fish by itself, then you have to order “sashimi”.

126. Sulu player John CHO
John Cho is an actor and musician who was born in Seoul, South Korea but who has lived in the US since he was a young boy. Cho’s break in movies came in playing Harold Lee in the ”Harold & Kumar” films. He is now making a name for himself playing Mr. Sulu in the latest “Star Trek” movies.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Filled fast food TACO
5. Orange County city ANAHEIM
12. Picks, with “for” OPTS
16. Improv piece BIT
19. Algerian seaport ORAN
20. Brand formerly marketed as Philishave outside the U.S. NORELCO
21. __-mutuel PARI
22. Fruity finish? -ADE
23. Way off the highway RAMP
24. Land on the Red Sea ARABIAN PENINSULA
27. Pick up the tab for TREAT TO
29. Homeowner’s burden LIEN
30. They include skateboarding and snowboarding X GAMES
31. “__ Angel”: doo-wop classic EARTH
32. __ about ON OR
36. Genus subdivision SPECIES
38. Mall unit STORE
39. Eponymous Italian educator MARIA MONTESSORI
44. Yule quenchers NOGS
46. Ben Gurion airline EL AL
47. ’60s activist gp. SDS
48. Fancy pitcher EWER
49. Laura Bush’s birth city MIDLAND
52. Turow work about first-year law students ONE L
54. About to come up ON DECK
56. “I’d like to buy __” AN I
57. Time Warner, to CNN PARENT COMPANY
62. Driller’s deg. DDS
63. Diagnostic test SCAN
65. Sling spirits GIN
66. Rise dramatically SPROUT UP
68. Driver’s license word, maybe HAZEL
70. “Horton Hears a Who!” villain VLAD
73. “Don’t change that” STET
74. New Zealand exports KIWIS
78. Wrongly left the base GONE AWOL
81. Russian fighter MIG
83. Rain block TARP
84. MC’s aid MIC
87. Periodic “Top Chef” judge with a restaurant in Manhattan WYLIE DUFRESNE
91. Wee SMA’
92. Orbital extreme APOGEE
94. Una y __ vez: time after time OTRA
95. Grabbed the chance MADE HAY
97. Golfer Aoki ISAO
98. Yukon winter hrs. PST
101. Smaller serving SIDE
103. Learned WISE
104. Rioter’s weapon MOLOTOV COCKTAIL
109. City on the Po TURIN
112. California city associated with the founding of Hells Angels FONTANA
113. Normandy river ORNE
114. “Friend __?” OR FOE
115. Not vulnerable (to) IMMUNE
118. Score symbol REST
120. Ford and others GERALDS
122. Macro, e.g. COMPUTER SHORTCUT
127. Bedtime in Burgundy NUIT
128. Music-licensing org. BMI
129. Affectedly quaint, in Colchester TWEE
130. “Great show!” in headlines IT’S A HIT!
131. Theater CINE
132. Utmost MAX
133. Word often written diagonally on signs SOLD
134. Taboo NOT DONE
135. River in central Germany EDER

Down
1. Linzer treats TORTES
2. Biblical landfall ARARAT
3. She voiced Princess Fiona in “Shrek” CAMERON DIAZ
4. Policing the area ON PATROL
5. Future MD’s course ANAT
6. Bad news at the inn NO ROOM
7. Altar constellation ARA
8. N.T. epistle HEB
9. Actor Wallach ELI
10. Myth ending -ICAL
11. Philosophy espousing a single reality MONISM
12. Like some auto leases OPEN-END
13. Kitchen cooker PAN
14. Upstairs neighbor of Ralph and Alice TRIXIE
15. Sears SINGES
16. “Queen Zixi of Ix” author BAUM
17. Not going IDLE
18. Brews for parties TEAS
25. Gourd fruits PEPOS
26. Got fresh with SASSED
28. Thing to mind, on train platforms THE GAP
33. Captain Kidd’s negative NAE
34. DuPont acrylic ORLON
35. Cheerful RIANT
37. Amt. after a period CTS
40. Smart ones? ALECS
41. Due OWED
42. Stamp on a packing list RECD
43. Peeves IRKS
45. Catch SNAG
49. Sour __ MASH
50. Worshipper of the sun god Inti INCA
51. Hooey DRIVEL
53. Hacks LOPS
54. CN Tower prov. ONT
55. Stooge chuckle NYUK
58. Zhou of China ENLAI
59. He played Clubber Lang in “Rocky III” MR T
60. Vichy verse POEME
61. Temple Grandin’s disorder AUTISM
64. Below zero: Abbr. NEG
67. Stomach part? PIT
69. Actor Rob LOWE
71. Bowl over AWE
72. Lamebrain DODO
75. Under-the-hood cleaner WASHER FLUID
76. Culinary author Rombauer IRMA
77. Fix, as a pet SPAY
79. TV’s “Science Guy” NYE
80. Ukraine city LUTSK
82. Eat away GNAW
84. Seriously injure MAIM
85. __ facto IPSO
86. Stove fuel COAL
88. It can be dipped in dip FRITO
89. Meteorologist’s tool RADAR
90. 73-Across writer EDITOR
93. Err GOOF UP
96. Allstate online subsidiary ESURANCE
98. Many a GI PVT
99. Like Capone’s face SCARRED
100. Moderates, with “down” TONES
102. A, in Augsburg EIN
105. From soup __ TO NUTS
106. Punch combo ONE-TWO
107. Make bread from chips? CASH IN
108. “Earthsea” series author Ursula LEGUIN
110. First-aid kit staple IODINE
111. Empty __ NESTER
115. SALT weapon ICBM
116. NYC cultural center MOMA
117. International Year of Astronomy year MMIX
119. Dog who reveals he can speak in “Tik-Tok of Oz” TOTO
121. Kitchen add-on? -ETTE
123. Sushi selection EEL
124. What U can follow RST
125. Mite TAD
126. Sulu player John CHO

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